New York State Conservationist Magazine

New York State Conservationist Magazine Welcome to New York State Department of Environmental Conservation's official magazine page. Conservationist magazine is a New York State-focused publication that will take your breath away.

Each issue is packed with informative and entertaining articles, first-rate photography and stunning artwork. Articles cover a broad range of environmental and natural history related topics, including fishing, hiking, recreation, travel, hunting, nature studies, and tips for green living. Published six times a year by the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation, Conservationist is

Each issue is packed with informative and entertaining articles, first-rate photography and stunning artwork. Articles cover a broad range of environmental and natural history related topics, including fishing, hiking, recreation, travel, hunting, nature studies, and tips for green living. Published six times a year by the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation, Conservationist is

Operating as usual

Photos from NYS  Department of Environmental Conservation's post
12/02/2021

Photos from NYS Department of Environmental Conservation's post

Fishers, or "fisher cats" as some people call them, are a large member of the weasel family. #Fishers have wide feet, wi...
12/01/2021

Fishers, or "fisher cats" as some people call them, are a large member of the weasel family. #Fishers have wide feet, with semi-retractable claws, which makes them very well adapted to walking on snow, climbing trees, and grasping prey. They are even able to descend from trees head-first due to the ability to rotate their back feet nearly 180 degrees! Primarily found in the northern, eastern, and southeastern parts of NYS, fishers are starting to expand into the southern tier and parts of central and western New York. #WildlifeWednesday

📷 David Strong

Fishers, or "fisher cats" as some people call them, are a large member of the weasel family. #Fishers have wide feet, with semi-retractable claws, which makes them very well adapted to walking on snow, climbing trees, and grasping prey. They are even able to descend from trees head-first due to the ability to rotate their back feet nearly 180 degrees! Primarily found in the northern, eastern, and southeastern parts of NYS, fishers are starting to expand into the southern tier and parts of central and western New York. #WildlifeWednesday

📷 David Strong

11/29/2021

Your photograph or artwork could be featured on New York’s next Arbor Day poster! DEC is now accepting submissions in our annual #ArborDay Poster Contest. Entries must be received by 12/31/2021.

Visit our website for details: https://www.dec.ny.gov/lands/5274.html#Contest

#HappyThanksgiving from the staff of the Conservationist! We hope that everyone has a safe, happy, and healthy holiday.📷...
11/25/2021

#HappyThanksgiving from the staff of the Conservationist! We hope that everyone has a safe, happy, and healthy holiday.

📷 Bob Lisiesky

#HappyThanksgiving from the staff of the Conservationist! We hope that everyone has a safe, happy, and healthy holiday.

📷 Bob Lisiesky

Of the six species of #wren known to have nested in NYS, only two, the winter wren and the Carolina wren, are normally f...
11/24/2021

Of the six species of #wren known to have nested in NYS, only two, the winter wren and the Carolina wren, are normally found here year-round. Carolina wrens are found throughout much of the eastern United States, and have been slowly expanding their range northward. NYS is right at the northern edge of their current year-round range. A shy bird of open woodlands, Carolina wrens are known for their loud songs, which are sung only by the males, unlike other wren species. Primarily insect eaters, in winter Carolina wrens will visit suet feeders. #WildlifeWednesday

📷 Jack Bulmer

Of the six species of #wren known to have nested in NYS, only two, the winter wren and the Carolina wren, are normally found here year-round. Carolina wrens are found throughout much of the eastern United States, and have been slowly expanding their range northward. NYS is right at the northern edge of their current year-round range. A shy bird of open woodlands, Carolina wrens are known for their loud songs, which are sung only by the males, unlike other wren species. Primarily insect eaters, in winter Carolina wrens will visit suet feeders. #WildlifeWednesday

📷 Jack Bulmer

NYS Conservationist Magazine makes a great holiday gift for the whole family! Subscribe now to get six issues for only $...
11/23/2021

NYS Conservationist Magazine makes a great holiday gift for the whole family! Subscribe now to get six issues for only $2 - PLUS, the next issue (December/January) will feature a full size 2022 calendar with beautiful nature photography from across New York State. As an added bonus, Conservationist for Kids is included three times per year.

Subscribe now: https://conservationist.secure.darwin.cx/I**002C

Gift a subscription of Conservationist to your friends and family: https://conservationist.secure.darwin.cx/I19AGF2C

**Please note - if you have any issues subscribing or purchasing a gift subscription, please send us an email at [email protected] and we would be happy to help!

NYS Conservationist Magazine makes a great holiday gift for the whole family! Subscribe now to get six issues for only $2 - PLUS, the next issue (December/January) will feature a full size 2022 calendar with beautiful nature photography from across New York State. As an added bonus, Conservationist for Kids is included three times per year.

Subscribe now: https://conservationist.secure.darwin.cx/I**002C

Gift a subscription of Conservationist to your friends and family: https://conservationist.secure.darwin.cx/I19AGF2C

**Please note - if you have any issues subscribing or purchasing a gift subscription, please send us an email at [email protected] and we would be happy to help!

11/23/2021

Millions of forested acres, thousands of miles of trails, and views like this…public lands offer us so many things to be thankful for. As we head into the cooler months, here are some easy ways we can all show New York’s public lands some love during this season of thanks:
👍 Take any trash out with you when you leave, including food scraps.
👍 Respect wildlife by keeping your distance, and never feed them.
👍 Take pictures instead of souvenirs.
👍 Always walk on the trail, not around it. Be prepared with microspikes in icy conditions.

Tell us why you’re thankful for public lands in the comments below! #LeaveNoTraceTuesday Leave No Trace

Photo by Sarah Fitscher

Photos from NYS  Department of Environmental Conservation's post
11/19/2021

Photos from NYS Department of Environmental Conservation's post

#DidYouKnow that like dogs, deer have a sense of smell that is between 500 to 1000 times better than humans? It is belie...
11/17/2021

#DidYouKnow that like dogs, deer have a sense of smell that is between 500 to 1000 times better than humans? It is believed that deer can smell something up to 1/4 of a mile away. You may have seen a deer (or other mammals) make a face that looks something like a sneer when it is smelling something - this is called the flehmen response. By inhaling with their nostrils partially or completely closed and their upper lip curled back, they are able to better direct the air (and scents) to their vomeronasal (Jacobson's) organ, a part of their olfactory (smell) system. This is especially noticeable when bucks are trying to locate does that are in estrus during the rut. #WildlifeWednesday

📷 Dean Bouton

#DidYouKnow that like dogs, deer have a sense of smell that is between 500 to 1000 times better than humans? It is believed that deer can smell something up to 1/4 of a mile away. You may have seen a deer (or other mammals) make a face that looks something like a sneer when it is smelling something - this is called the flehmen response. By inhaling with their nostrils partially or completely closed and their upper lip curled back, they are able to better direct the air (and scents) to their vomeronasal (Jacobson's) organ, a part of their olfactory (smell) system. This is especially noticeable when bucks are trying to locate does that are in estrus during the rut. #WildlifeWednesday

📷 Dean Bouton

The Fall 2021 issue of Conservationist for Kids "Trees Are Terrific!" is now available on our website at https://www.dec...
11/15/2021

The Fall 2021 issue of Conservationist for Kids "Trees Are Terrific!" is now available on our website at https://www.dec.ny.gov/education/122778.html. Published three times per year, Conservationist for Kids is sent in classroom packets to 4th grade classrooms across NYS. It is also available at DEC's environmental education centers, regional offices, and fish hatcheries, NYS Parks nature centers, and is included as an insert in Conservationist magazine in February, April, and October.

The Fall 2021 issue of Conservationist for Kids "Trees Are Terrific!" is now available on our website at https://www.dec.ny.gov/education/122778.html. Published three times per year, Conservationist for Kids is sent in classroom packets to 4th grade classrooms across NYS. It is also available at DEC's environmental education centers, regional offices, and fish hatcheries, NYS Parks nature centers, and is included as an insert in Conservationist magazine in February, April, and October.

11/12/2021

Check out all those destinations! The New York State Birding Trail is live! The NYC region is the first segment of the trail to be completed. Other segments of the trail will be rolled out in a phased, regional approach and will be announced as they are completed, so stay tuned!

Plan your next outdoor birding adventure by using the New York State Birding Trail map and website: https://on.ny.gov/2N1YA61. #IBirdNY

Happy #VeteransDay from the staff of the Conservationist. We thank you for your dedication and service, today and every ...
11/11/2021

Happy #VeteransDay from the staff of the Conservationist. We thank you for your dedication and service, today and every day!

📷 Bill Combs Jr.

Happy #VeteransDay from the staff of the Conservationist. We thank you for your dedication and service, today and every day!

📷 Bill Combs Jr.

One of the most common birds in North America, dark-eyed #juncos are found from Alaska to Mexico and California to New Y...
11/10/2021

One of the most common birds in North America, dark-eyed #juncos are found from Alaska to Mexico and California to New York. They are found year-round in the western mountains, Canada, and the northeastern U.S., and breed primarily in Canada and parts of the northern United States. As colder weather arrives, they appear in large numbers across much of the United States, earning them the nickname snowbirds. Juncos are a type of sparrow, and are primarily seed eaters. They are commonly observed at birdfeeders throughout the winter months, before retreating back north in the spring. #WildlifeWednesday

📷 Jack Bulmer

One of the most common birds in North America, dark-eyed #juncos are found from Alaska to Mexico and California to New York. They are found year-round in the western mountains, Canada, and the northeastern U.S., and breed primarily in Canada and parts of the northern United States. As colder weather arrives, they appear in large numbers across much of the United States, earning them the nickname snowbirds. Juncos are a type of sparrow, and are primarily seed eaters. They are commonly observed at birdfeeders throughout the winter months, before retreating back north in the spring. #WildlifeWednesday

📷 Jack Bulmer

11/08/2021

Thursday, November 11th, will mark the last Free Fishing Day of 2021. Since it coincides with Veteran's Day, it's a great opportunity to spend some quality time on the water with that special veteran in your life. Even though you don’t need a freshwater fishing license for the day, fishing regulations are still in effect (https://on.ny.gov/3szKPzI).

The weather may be getting cooler, but great fishing can still be had throughout the state. Check out DEC's Places to Fish webpages to plan your next trip: https://on.ny.gov/3xpnTFk. There are also a host of inland trout streams that were closed to fishing in previous years, but now have a Catch and Release trout season on them (using artificial lures only). For trout stream access maps and information, check out DECinfo Locator: https://on.ny.gov/troutmap.

Check out DEC's Places to Fish webpages to plan your next trip: https://on.ny.gov/3xpnTFk. #IFishNY

Image courtesy of Grant Taylor, Project Healing Waters Fly Fishing, Inc.

11/05/2021
Albino or leucistic? In this case, it all comes down to the eyes. Albinism is a complete lack of melanin, which gives th...
11/03/2021

Albino or leucistic? In this case, it all comes down to the eyes. Albinism is a complete lack of melanin, which gives the color to skin, eyes, feathers, and hair. Leucism is a lack of pigmentation which often presents as patchy white coloration, although leucistic individuals can also be solid white. Leucistic animals retain their dark eye coloration, while albino animals normally have pinkish or reddish eyes. #WildlifeWednesday

📷 John Raynor

11/01/2021
10/28/2021

The crisp bite in the air and the crunch of the fallen leaves means it’s a perfect time to get out for a hike. While exploring the outdoors, you may come across the remains of one New York’s many mammals. It can tough to decipher whether a skull belongs to a coyote, raccoon, or fox, but a few little tips can help you figure it out. Tune in tomorrow, October 29th at noon (12pm) for a Facebook LIVE Q&A with DEC Biologists Mandy Watson and Dave Kramer for a skull show and tell!

Additional information on New York mammals can be found on the DEC website at: https://www.dec.ny.gov/animals/263.html.

Great-horned #owls feed on the widest range of prey of all North American raptors, feeding on everything from tiny roden...
10/27/2021

Great-horned #owls feed on the widest range of prey of all North American raptors, feeding on everything from tiny rodents, insects, and scorpions to rabbits, skunks, and even geese and other raptors. Their diet consists primarily of birds and mammals, but they will supplement it with reptiles, invertebrates, fish, and sometimes even carrion. While they are primarily nocturnal hunters, they will also occasionally hunt in broad daylight. #WildlifeWednesday

📷 Fred Giardinelli

Great-horned #owls feed on the widest range of prey of all North American raptors, feeding on everything from tiny rodents, insects, and scorpions to rabbits, skunks, and even geese and other raptors. Their diet consists primarily of birds and mammals, but they will supplement it with reptiles, invertebrates, fish, and sometimes even carrion. While they are primarily nocturnal hunters, they will also occasionally hunt in broad daylight. #WildlifeWednesday

📷 Fred Giardinelli

10/26/2021

Fall is a critical time for wildlife. As they gather food, put on pounds, and prepare their homes for winter, animals are especially active and vulnerable to human impacts. Help them succeed by following these Leave No Trace tips:

🙂 ↔️ 🐇 Give wildlife space. Getting too close might scare an animal away from its hard-earned food stash or home.

🦌 🚫 🍎] Don’t feed animals. Feeding wildlife encourages a dependency on humans that can lessen the animal’s ability to thrive on their own.

🗑 Take home your waste. If added to a winter stash, perishable food scraps can rot and ruin a critter’s entire food store.

🦮 Keep dogs leashed. Even the best-behaved canines are prone to chasing critters.

#LNTTuesday #RespectWildlife Leave No Trace

Photos from NYS  Department of Environmental Conservation's post
10/22/2021

Photos from NYS Department of Environmental Conservation's post

The glossy #ibis is a species of wading bird found in shallow freshwater wetlands, brackish and saltwater wetlands, mang...
10/20/2021

The glossy #ibis is a species of wading bird found in shallow freshwater wetlands, brackish and saltwater wetlands, mangroves, and rice fields. A colonial nester, they become somewhat nomadic after the nesting season, and over the last 100 or so years have expanded their range northward from the southeastern United States. They can now be found along much of the east coast. Glossy ibis are also found in Europe, Asia, and Africa. They feed primarily on aquatic invertebrates.

This juvenile was photographed recently at Montezuma National Wildlife Refuge by Nikki Keator. #WildlifeWednesday

The glossy #ibis is a species of wading bird found in shallow freshwater wetlands, brackish and saltwater wetlands, mangroves, and rice fields. A colonial nester, they become somewhat nomadic after the nesting season, and over the last 100 or so years have expanded their range northward from the southeastern United States. They can now be found along much of the east coast. Glossy ibis are also found in Europe, Asia, and Africa. They feed primarily on aquatic invertebrates.

This juvenile was photographed recently at Montezuma National Wildlife Refuge by Nikki Keator. #WildlifeWednesday

Photos from NYS  Department of Environmental Conservation's post
10/19/2021

Photos from NYS Department of Environmental Conservation's post

10/19/2021

Sustainable forest management is a key part of New York’s forest product industry. Did you know that nearly 2 million acres of New York’s forests are certified through a third party as using sustainable forestry practices?

At DEC, we follow the requirements from two different international sets of forest management standards. Our 780,000+ acres of State Forests have met these standards and received dual certification for 13 years in a row now. DEC is committed to harvesting timber in a scientifically, environmentally, socially, and economically responsible manner to meet current demand without compromising the needs of future generations. More info at https://www.dec.ny.gov/lands/69749.html. #NationalForestProductsWeek

Photo by Hans Isaacson for the National Association of State Foresters

Photos from NYS  Department of Environmental Conservation's post
10/15/2021

Photos from NYS Department of Environmental Conservation's post

Unlike most birds, turkey #vultures have an excellent sense of smell! They are able to smell carrion from up to 5 miles ...
10/13/2021

Unlike most birds, turkey #vultures have an excellent sense of smell! They are able to smell carrion from up to 5 miles away, thanks in large part to the structure of their beak. As can be seen in this photo, turkey vultures have a hole in their beak, which goes all the way through. This allows odors to pass through from both sides, enhancing their sense of smell. The bony structure surrounding this hole also helps to protect the nares (nostrils) while eating, safeguarding the apparatus that gives them the best sense of small of all vulture species. #WildlifeWednesday

📷 Elizabeth Ricci

Unlike most birds, turkey #vultures have an excellent sense of smell! They are able to smell carrion from up to 5 miles away, thanks in large part to the structure of their beak. As can be seen in this photo, turkey vultures have a hole in their beak, which goes all the way through. This allows odors to pass through from both sides, enhancing their sense of smell. The bony structure surrounding this hole also helps to protect the nares (nostrils) while eating, safeguarding the apparatus that gives them the best sense of small of all vulture species. #WildlifeWednesday

📷 Elizabeth Ricci

10/12/2021

Fall is an amazing time to get outdoors and camp. Many state lands allow for primitive tent or lean-to camping deep in the woods, without access to things like running water. Primitive camping isn’t for everyone but if you are planning a backcountry trip, it’s important to camp on durable surfaces. The easiest way to do this is to stay at a designated primitive campsite. Designated campsites (look for the yellow “camp here” disks like the one in the photo) have harder soils that are easier to camp on and are less likely to be damaged by human activity.

If you must set up camp outside a designated campsite remember, durable surfaces include dry grasses, gravel/rock, and even snow. Wherever you’re camping, make sure you come prepared and Leave No Trace! Check out our webpage on primitive camping for more information https://www.dec.ny.gov/outdoor/41282.html.

#LNTTuesday Leave No Trace

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Comments

I love your magazine, and I especially loved the calendars you have included in the December issue the last couple of years. Will you be printing a 2022 calendar in next month's issue? 🤞
Is theCinservationist having a Black Friday special this year?
I just started a new job enrolling people in a local community solar project. The project creates guaranteed savings for anyone who signs up and it's great for the environment! As part of my training, I’m required to give some initial presentations. Enrolling is free and there aren't any commitments. www.commonenergy.us/team/jroulier DM for details.
Can you post pictures and differences between coyotes and wolves?
Could you send me a subscription form , mine seems to have run out and i would like to resubscribe to the magazine. Thank you. B Diefenbacher.
Guess I will be subscribing to this magazine.
For the first time in over 46 years, we are seeing 5 loons, in a grouping, on Oxbow Lake. None of the loons appear to be Juveniles and for the most part, they seem to be getting along well. Just wondering how unusual this is and how it may affect a small lake like Oxbow.
Today I witnessed a fisher taking a fawn. I have a video, it may be disturbing for some so I did not post it.
I have fished New York Waters over my lifetime & I have caught a number of unusual fish. Including a Gar in Cayuga Lake when I was 10 years old - I thought I caught a dinosaur! I’ve caught Eel in Cayuga lake, all sorts of catfish and suckers, several Sheepshead - but perhaps the strangest was something I caught earlier this week in a slow-moving estuary of a trib to Lake Ontario. It was a Bowfin of about 8 or 9 lbs and it put up a terrific fight. Released unharmed, sadly I didn’t have a camera with me at the time. So what is the story of this strange looking fish?
we had blue birds just ready to fledge and didn't see them,checked the nest and four were dead inside.any ideas why?