Albion, Michigan News

Albion, Michigan News Albion Michigan News; keeping you updated. Articles about The City of Albion, State of Michigan, Local, Regional, National News and Events. Information on Weather, Sports, and School Closing.

Albion Michigan News 24/7

Mission: Albion local News; keeping you updated. Delivering Articles on the latest City, State, Regional and National Events. Providing Information on Weather, Sports, Entertainment and School Closing. Become a supporter and be in the know. Residents may also post positive News or community alerts and updates.

Operating as usual

Haas Trucking, Inc.Our Back to School Supply Drive is up and running!! Our office staff and drivers have been so great!!...
08/11/2020

Haas Trucking, Inc.

Our Back to School Supply Drive is up and running!! Our office staff and drivers have been so great!! Keep it up!!

Reminder: We are be collecting school supplies until Aug 30th and then we’ll be donating to a local school. Items that can be donated: sanitizer, gloves, markers, binders, paper, Kleenex, etc!

Our Back to School Supply Drive is up and running!! Our office staff and drivers have been so great!! Keep it up!!

Reminder: We are be collecting school supplies until Aug 30th and then we’ll be donating to a local school. Items that can be donated: sanitizer, gloves, markers, binders, paper, Kleenex, etc!

Team 1 Plastics
08/11/2020

Team 1 Plastics

Oh my, this warm, muggy weather is tough. Luckily for us, the bosses authorized the creation of a gigantic, ice-cold, chocolate milkshake for us all to share! #team1plastics #albionmichigan #hotasheck

Calhoun County Sheriff's Office, Michigan
08/10/2020

Calhoun County Sheriff's Office, Michigan

FROM THE NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE: Strong winds and heavy rain could occur late this afternoon and into the evening hours. Please be aware of the possibility for dangerous and/or damaging winds as this system passes through Michigan.

Weather Advisory for Albion, MIRadar Updated: August 10, 2020 at 8:25PM
08/10/2020

Weather Advisory for Albion, MI
Radar Updated: August 10, 2020 at 8:25PM

Around Albion TodayAugust 10, 2020
08/10/2020

Around Albion Today
August 10, 2020

Albuon Weathr ForecastUpdated: August 10, 2020 at 7:45AMTodayA 40 percent chance of showers and thunderstorms, mainly af...
08/10/2020

Albuon Weathr Forecast
Updated: August 10, 2020 at 7:45AM

Today
A 40 percent chance of showers and thunderstorms, mainly after 8am. Partly sunny and hot, with a high near 91. South southwest wind 8 to 14 mph.

Tonight
Showers and thunderstorms likely, mainly before 11pm. Mostly cloudy, with a low around 67. Southwest wind 6 to 11 mph. Chance of precipitation is 60%. New rainfall amounts of less than a tenth of an inch, except higher amounts possible in thunderstorms.

Albion Weather ForecastMonday August 10, 2020Updated: 11:52PM August 9, 2020MondayShowers and thunderstorms likely, main...
08/10/2020

Albion Weather Forecast
Monday August 10, 2020
Updated: 11:52PM August 9, 2020

Monday
Showers and thunderstorms likely, mainly after 4pm. Mostly sunny, with a high near 88. South southwest wind 6 to 10 mph, with gusts as high as 18 mph. Chance of precipitation is 60%. New rainfall amounts of less than a tenth of an inch, except higher amounts possible in thunderstorms.

Monday Night
Showers and thunderstorms likely, mainly before 7pm. Increasing clouds, with a low around 68. West southwest wind 3 to 6 mph. Chance of precipitation is 60%. New rainfall amounts between a quarter and half of an inch

Current Albion WeatherAlbion 9, 2020 at 11:50PM
08/10/2020

Current Albion Weather
Albion 9, 2020 at 11:50PM

UPDATE: County Administrator Chet Janik tells The Associated Press that Eckerle will submit a letter of resignation Mond...
08/10/2020
Michigan official to resign after defending racist slur

UPDATE: County Administrator Chet Janik tells The Associated Press that Eckerle will submit a letter of resignation Monday.

An official in a northern Michigan county says another official who acknowledged using a racist slur plans to resign.

☺️
08/09/2020

☺️

Brent Scowcroft died Aug. 6 at age 95. The West Point graduate and retired Air Force lieutenant general served as nation...
08/09/2020
Brent Scowcroft, national security adviser to 2 presidents, dies

Brent Scowcroft died Aug. 6 at age 95. The West Point graduate and retired Air Force lieutenant general served as national security adviser to Presidents Gerald Ford and George H.W. Bush.

The West Point graduate and retired Air Force lieutenant general died Aug. 6 at age 95.

Four Bloody Marys, two Margaritas, and six lines of coke - and that's only breakfast. A break down of Hunter S. Thompson...
08/09/2020
A Breakdown Of Hunter S. Thompson's Daily Drug And Alcohol Use

Four Bloody Marys, two Margaritas, and six lines of coke - and that's only breakfast. A break down of Hunter S. Thompson’s Daily Drug and Alcohol use.

Hunter Stockton Thompson (July 18, 1937 – February 20, 2005) was an American journalist and author, and the founder of the gonzo journalism movement.

Astounding.

Hutches Food Center is accepting applications for weekends and evenings. Ask an employee for an application. 😊8025 Sprin...
08/09/2020

Hutches Food Center is accepting applications for weekends and evenings. Ask an employee for an application. 😊
8025 Spring Arbor Rd
Spring Arbor, MI 49283
United States

08/09/2020
Don’t forget to tip your baristas ☺️
08/09/2020

Don’t forget to tip your baristas ☺️

This New Zealand man gets paid $10,000 a year to be a city's official wizardBy Julia Hollingsworth, CNN |  8/8/2020On a ...
08/09/2020
This New Zealand man gets paid $10,000 a year to be a city's official wizard

This New Zealand man gets paid $10,000 a year to be a city's official wizard

By Julia Hollingsworth, CNN | 8/8/2020

On a sunny autumn afternoon, two wizards in long, black robes and pointed hats sat down for coffee in one of New Zealand's biggest cities.

On a sunny autumn afternoon, two wizards in long, black robes and pointed hats sat down for coffee in one of New Zealand's biggest cities.

That's because, in Christchurch, seeing a wizard isn't completely out of the ordinary.

For decades, the city has had an official wizard. Born in the United Kingdom, Ian Brackenbury Channell settled in New Zealand in the 1970s, where he became known as The Wizard. As if to reinforce how serious he is, he even held a New Zealand driver's license issued to The Wizard, although he says he hasn't officially changed his name.

Over the years, he became a fixture in the city. On the paved square in front of Christchurch's cathedral, he pontificated on his life theories, wore wizard robes and became such a well-known figure that he earned himself a TripAdvisor rating (four out of five stars). Since 1998, he's been paid 16,000 New Zealand dollars ($10,400) annually by the Christchurch City Council for "wizardry."

Now age 87, The Wizard spends less time in the public eye. He wants to find a successor -- and appears to have got one in 39-year-old Ari Freeman, who teaches guitar and fronts a psychedelic funk band.

As he and Freeman sit at at a table outside a sunny, inner-city cafe, a middle-aged cyclist calls out to them: "No casting spells fellas!"

"Can't promise anything," Freeman quips.

Becoming a wizard
As a young man, The Wizard backpacked around Europe, was a Royal Air Force Officer in Canada, and taught English literature at the University of Tehran. But it wasn't until he moved to Australia with his then-wife that he found the role he would spend his life playing: The Wizard.

After finishing his degree in sociology and psychology, he worked as a community arts organizer for the University of Western Australia in Perth, and then as a teaching fellow in sociology at the University of New South Wales (UNSW) in Sydney.

There, he started what he called a "fun revolution," aimed at bringing love, logic and levity to the world, and turning the university into a "theater of the absurd." When he lost his university job, he hatched a plan with the vice chancellor to give him a new position -- UNSW's first official wizard.

"I've invented a wizard out of nowhere," says The Wizard. "There were no wizards when I arrived in the world, except in books."

A picture of him in the role -- published by Origins, the newsletter of the UNSW Archives -- shows him wearing a leather jacket, standing on a chair and holding a skull like a modern-day Hamlet.

To The Wizard, his job doesn't mean casting spells, or impersonating Gandalf from JRR Tolkien's Lord of the Rings trilogy. As he sees it, his role is to be a kind of provocateur -- someone who brings a sense of fun to the world, but also criticizes the system. A showman, who doesn't mind making a fool of himself.

"Every day the world gets more serious, so fun is the most powerful thing in the world right now," he says.

But, as The Wizard tells it, there were plenty of people against him. The academics in Sydney didn't like what he was doing ("academics don't like silly, fun things," he says) so he headed to the University of Melbourne, where he claims he led his own cosmology department. The university, however, says that is an "aggrandizement" of what he was doing -- according to them, he was not employed by the university, although he was associated with the student union.

When he became a wizard, he said he lost all his friends and his wife left him -- he says he turned her throwing him out of the house into a ritual by inviting friends to come, too. "To me it was fun, but not to her. She's still furious."

So in 1974, he moved to Christchurch, New Zealand. And it was there that his wizarding path really took off.

Mystical Christchurch
If there was ever a place to be a wizard, Christchurch is it.

While many inner-city buildings are still in disrepair from the 2011 earthquake that devastated the city and killed 185 people, some of its Gothic-revival architecture remains, and there's a distinctly British feel to the built environment. When low-lying fog rolls through the city, clinging to the gray stone buildings and colonial-era statues, it has the effect of conjuring a scene out of a British crime series, or low-budget horror movie.

In short: it's suitably mystical for a wizard.

When The Wizard arrived in Christchurch in the 1970s, he saw the city as the "romantic dream," a beautiful place far from the rest of the world which was unlikely to become a hub for economic development.

Once there, he became a mainstay in Cathedral Square, where he stood on a ladder and dressed in a variety of outfits, including in a loin cloth as John the Baptist. He praised the British Empire and criticized what he calls "anti-male sexism."

At first, the council wasn't taken with him, according to The Wizard. They initially refused to appoint him the city's official wizard and wouldn't grant him the written permission he needed to speak in the square under Christchurch bylaws. So The Wizard played "silly games with the council" -- he wore a gas mask and spoke in French, hoping to evade the rules.

"I've been the most popular man in Christchurch since then," The Wizard claimed. "And the most hated man by the bureaucrats."

But as his profile rose, he got more official recognition.

In 1982, the New Zealand Art Gallery Directors Association said he had become a living work of art -- the Auckland City Art Gallery document described the work's medium as "artist's corporeal substance" and its value as "priceless." (Funnily enough, The Wizard is not overly positive about modern art, which he describes as "mainly about writing applications for grants.")

In 1988, Waimate -- a town not far from Christchurch -- was in the grips of a drought. The organizers of a local agriculture fair invited him to perform a rain dance, and, according to The Wizard, rain fell only a few hours after he began beating his drum. "The Wizard adjourned to the refreshment tent to watch the downpour and partake of the free whiskeys that were thrust into his hands by the visibly shaken farmers," his website says.

In 1990, then New Zealand Prime Minister Mike Moore wrote him a letter on the official prime ministerial letterhead, suggesting that he should "urgently consider my suggestion that you become the Wizard of New Zealand, Antarctica and relevant offshore areas."

"No doubt there will be implications in the area of spells, blessings, curses, and other supernatural matters that are beyond the competence of mere Prime Ministers," Moore wrote.

Eight years later came perhaps the biggest validation of his status to date -- and an amazing about-turn.

Christchurch City Council contracted him to "provide acts of wizardry and other wizard-like-services as part of promotional work for the city of Christchurch," according to a council spokesperson. The Wizard is paid 16,000 New Zealand dollars ($10,400) annually -- for reference, New Zealand's pension for a single person is 22,039 New Zealand dollars annually after tax. The wizard doesn't pay tax, and is financially supported by his fiance of 43 years, Alice Flett, who he met at an Anglican church in Christchurch, and got engaged to in a public performance.

According to a Council spokesperson, his services include assisting with promoting local events and tourism, as well as welcoming dignitaries or delegations to the city, which would usually involve no more than 200 hours of work each year.

In 2009, The Wizard received the Queen's Service Medal -- one of the highest honors in New Zealand. "I couldn't believe it, I thought it would never happen," The Wizard says.

A wizarding apprentice
Freeman has been The Wizard's apprentice for six years -- but has seen himself as a wizard for far longer.

"I think it came together in my mid-20s. It's one of those things you don't have a name for and when you look back, you realize you've been doing it for a long, long time."

In 2014, Freeman decided to take the next step. He walked up to The Wizard, already sporting a long beard. "Hi, I'm Ari, and I'm a young wizard," he recalls saying. "OK, let's get started then," Freeman says the Wizard replied.

Being a wizard's apprentice -- as you might imagine -- isn't an especially formal arrangement. The pair meet up and argue a lot, although Freeman is rarely able to change The Wizard's opinion.

After all, the Wizard -- who often slips into impassioned tangents -- isn't shy about holding strong views. The Census, which he has evaded for decades, is "a branding of animals on the farm." Wicca, also known as Pagan witchcraft, is "shallow consumerist stuff, I'm afraid ... It's like vegetarianism, it's a fad."

The Wizard is resistant to the idea of a female wizard, and suggests women can be fairies, instead. He's not convinced by climate change, although he does like the idea of a simpler way of life ("The Hobbits were right.")

Among the things Freeman and the elder wizard disagree on is music. While The Wizard says a lot of music is "evil," Freeman thinks music is a form of magic. If he plays the right song in the right context, he can make people dance. "They'll think it's their idea to dance, but my song did it," he said.

Freeman went into being a wizard with few expectations, but in his tens of thousands of interactions, he's barely had any negative experiences. He's had a similarly positive reception from his friends, family and partner. When he told his partner that he wanted to be a wizard, "she loved it."

But times are changing for wizarding types. The Wizard's old haunt -- Cathedral Square -- is not what it once was. A barricade encircles the old church, and birds perch in the earthquake-ruined vault. And there is perhaps little need for a public figure whose views are increasingly out of step with those around him.

Freeman knows he can't be a wizard without the community's buy in. If people want a wizard, he will be one, he says. The council did not comment when asked whether Freeman would be given The Wizard's contract.

"I want the wizard phenomenon to continue, and I will totally fulfill that role," Freeman said. "Like a band needs a guitar player -- I'll be that guitar player."

To Freeman, being a wizard is a way to empower people who are lost or depressed, and shake them out of the bounds of what's expected.

"It takes someone to do something unusual to poke their head in to create a zeigeist change," Freeman said. "And those people are magicians."

Source: https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/world/this-new-zealand-man-gets-paid-10-000-a-year-to-be-a-city-s-official-wizard/ar-BB17K5j3?ocid=msedgntp

In Christchurch, New Zealand, seeing a wizard isn't completely out of the ordinary. For decades, the city has had an official wizard.

Americans are moving around too much and taking coronavirus with them, expert saysBy Madeline Holcombe and Dakin Andone,...
08/09/2020

Americans are moving around too much and taking coronavirus with them, expert says

By Madeline Holcombe and Dakin Andone, CNN | 8/8/2020

Covid-19 precautions need to stay consistent -- whether or not the numbers are coming down -- because the more Americans move around the more the virus does too, a health expert said.

When case numbers start to come down, people tend to interact more, and more movement predicts how the virus will spread, said Dr. Christopher Murray, director of the Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation (IHME) at the University of Washington.

Though cases have risen to more than 4.9 million and coronavirus deaths have surpassed 161,000, former hotspots like New York are seeing positive changes. But health experts have predicted the national death toll will get worse through the year, and many have called for a stronger national leadership against the virus.

In a list ranking countries' response to the pandemic assessed by Foreign Policy Magazine, the United States ranks near the bottom.

"If you look at the mobility data collected from cell phones in many parts of the country, we're almost back to pre-Covid levels of mobility, so we're just not being as cautious as other people are in other countries," Murray told CNN's Wolf Blitzer on Friday.

Precautions can bring and keep the numbers down while the nation waits on a vaccine, US Surgeon General Dr. Jerome Adams said in a news briefing Friday. All it takes is what he calls his "Three W's."

"Number one, wash your hands. Number two, watch your distance -- meaning stay at least six feet from others and avoid crowded places. And number three, wear a face mask," Adams said.

There is encouraging news: Murray said Friday that the rate of mask use in the US has gone up about 5% in the last 10 days, particularly in states with higher caseloads, like California, Texas and Florida.

That could save tens of thousands of lives. While IHME's model projects more than 295,000 deaths in the US by December 1, it also shows that consistent mask wearing could save more than 66,000 lives.

Nation grapples with economic fallout
Adding to the nation's struggle is the pandemic's economic fallout.

President Donald Trump signed four executive orders on Saturday, including one that would provide $400 in enhanced unemployment benefits -- 25% of which states are expected to cover -- after negotiations stalled this week over a new stimulus package.

The other three orders signed by the President include a payroll tax holiday for Americans earning less than $100,000 a year, as well as extending an eviction moratorium and deferring student loan payments.

The actions are likely to be challenged by Democrats in court.

Up to 40 million Americans risk eviction by the end of the year, according to a report published Friday by the Aspen Institute. And while the US economy added another 1.8 million jobs in July, it was a slowdown from the 4.8 million jobs added in June and a small step for an economy still down 12.9 million jobs during the pandemic.

In Los Angeles Friday, cars lined up at a backpack and food giveaway for families of students. Among them was Henry Herrera, a father of two who said he's unemployed due to the pandemic.

On Friday he was able to get backpacks and food for his children who rely on school meal plans for breakfast and lunch. Herrera showed CNN a box full of fresh produce like apples, potatoes and carrots.

"That's really helped out a lot, because with Covid-19 I ain't able to work. We're struggling here and there to make ends meet," Herrera said, adding, "but we're doing it though."

The Covid-19 pandemic has disproportionately impacted the poor, in addition to older populations and people with chronic conditions, explained Dr. Richard Seidman, the chief medical officer at L.A. Care Health Plan, one of the hosts of the drive-thru event.

"The communities with the highest rates of poverty also have the highest rates of infections and deaths," Seidman told CNN. "So the longer this drags on — and unfortunately with some of the challenges at the national level with Congress failing to pass and extend some of the financial aid benefits — it pushes some people that much more into poverty."

Rethinking testing
One important factor to reopening the US while maintaining safety is rethinking the national strategy on testing for the virus, said Dr. Rajiv Shah, president of the Rockefeller Foundation and former USAID administrator.

Currently, only symptomatic people are frequently tested, meaning 40% to 50% of all spreaders, those who don't show symptoms, aren't being tested and told they may be contagious, he said.

"You have to know that as soon as possible, and then limit transmission from that node of contagion," he said during an Aspen Ideas webinar on Friday. "That's the whole ball game."

But even testing primarily symptomatic people been impacted by backlog, many states report.

The Virginia Department of Health reported a sharp increase of cases on Friday, but that increase came from a technical issue and a backlog from the two days prior, according to a statement.

And Miami-Dade County, the hotspot for cases in Florida, continues to struggle with a lag in testing results, according to state data obtained by CNN.

One day in the past week, testing labs reported that 19.2% of test results took more than seven days to deliver. On a different day, 45% of test results took between four and seven days.

Precautions matter for children, too
Researchers are learning more about how the virus spreads among children.

A new report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention supports the early belief that most coronavirus cases in children appear to be either asymptomatic or mild. But, the report said, when children are hospitalized, they need the intensive care unit as often as adults do.

To slow the pandemic, the CDC said children should be encouraged to wash their hands often, keep a good physical distance away from others, and if they are 2 years of age or older, they should wear a mask when they are around people outside of their family members.

One rare but serious complication children can develop from a coronavirus infection is known as multisystem inflammatory syndrome, or MIS-C, and at least 570 cases have been reported, the CDC said.

As the pandemic continues, health care providers should be on the lookout for the syndrome that most commonly causes abdominal pain, vomiting and a skin rash.

More than 74% of the cases were among Hispanic and Black children, the CDC said.

The report comes as schools reopen for the new school year, including in the largest school district in Georgia, where teachers are protesting the decision to resume in-person instruction on August 26, after just two weeks of online learning.

At least 263 Gwinnett County employees have already tested positive for Covid-19 or are in quarantine, and school hasn't even started.

"It seems like standardized test scores matter a whole lot to this county," teacher Brian Westlake told CNN's Natasha Chen. "But Covid test scores don't seem to matter enough."

Dr. Marybeth Sexton, an assistant professor of infectious disease at Emory University, warned that with community spread, there's a risk of students and staff showing up with Covid-19.

"With the degree of cases we're still seeing in the Metro Atlanta area and a lot of places throughout the United States, it means on the first day of classes, you're going to have a certain percentage of students and faculty who show up who are already infected," she said.

She said masks were vital for the safety of not only everyone in the school building, but also the wider community. "Those students are going home to family members who may be vulnerable, and the teachers, the school bus drivers, the school custodians, the people who work in the cafeteria -- all of those people are at risk, too."

Cases rise as country nears new milestone
State and local leaders across the country continue to try and contain the spread of the coronavirus as the number of US cases nears 5 million cases.

The new Microsoft Edge
Download now the latest browser recommended by Microsoft
South Carolina's Department of Health and Environmental Control (DHEC) on Saturday announced a new "Fight the Spread" campaign, encouraging residents to wear masks, practice social distancing and get tested. The state reported 1,178 new cases, bringing the statewide total to more than 98,700, according to DHEC.

Wisconsin saw its highest daily new case count on Saturday, with 1,165 reported cases, according to the Wisconsin Department of Health Services, bringing the statewide total to 59,933 reported cases.

Illinois reported 2,190 new cases on Saturday -- the second day in a row that the state's health department reported more than 2,000 new Covid-19 positive cases. It was the highest daily reported case count since May 24, when the department reported 2,508 new cases. Statewide, there are more than 192,698 cases, according to the department of health.

Texas Gov. Greg Abbott extended his state's Covid-19 disaster declaration on Saturday, nearly 5 months after it was first issued on March 13 to help Texas counties fight the pandemic.

"I urge Texans to remain vigilant in our fight against this virus," Abbott said in a statement. "Everyone must do their part to slow the spread of COVID-19 by wearing a mask, practicing social distancing and washing your hands frequently and thoroughly."

"Number one, wash your hands. Number two, watch your distance -- meaning stay at least six feet from others and avoid crowded places. And number three, wear a face mask," Adams said.

There is encouraging news: Murray said Friday that the rate of mask use in the US has gone up about 5% in the last 10 days, particularly in states with higher caseloads, like California, Texas and Florida.

That could save tens of thousands of lives. While IHME's model projects more than 295,000 deaths in the US by December 1, it also shows that consistent mask wearing could save more than 66,000 lives.

Nation grapples with economic fallout
Adding to the nation's struggle is the pandemic's economic fallout.

President Donald Trump signed four executive orders on Saturday, including one that would provide $400 in enhanced unemployment benefits -- 25% of which states are expected to cover -- after negotiations stalled this week over a new stimulus package.

The other three orders signed by the President include a payroll tax holiday for Americans earning less than $100,000 a year, as well as extending an eviction moratorium and deferring student loan payments.

The actions are likely to be challenged by Democrats in court.

Up to 40 million Americans risk eviction by the end of the year, according to a report published Friday by the Aspen Institute. And while the US economy added another 1.8 million jobs in July, it was a slowdown from the 4.8 million jobs added in June and a small step for an economy still down 12.9 million jobs during the pandemic.

In Los Angeles Friday, cars lined up at a backpack and food giveaway for families of students. Among them was Henry Herrera, a father of two who said he's unemployed due to the pandemic.

On Friday he was able to get backpacks and food for his children who rely on school meal plans for breakfast and lunch. Herrera showed CNN a box full of fresh produce like apples, potatoes and carrots.

"That's really helped out a lot, because with Covid-19 I ain't able to work. We're struggling here and there to make ends meet," Herrera said, adding, "but we're doing it though."

The Covid-19 pandemic has disproportionately impacted the poor, in addition to older populations and people with chronic conditions, explained Dr. Richard Seidman, the chief medical officer at L.A. Care Health Plan, one of the hosts of the drive-thru event.

"The communities with the highest rates of poverty also have the highest rates of infections and deaths," Seidman told CNN. "So the longer this drags on — and unfortunately with some of the challenges at the national level with Congress failing to pass and extend some of the financial aid benefits — it pushes some people that much more into poverty."

Rethinking testing
One important factor to reopening the US while maintaining safety is rethinking the national strategy on testing for the virus, said Dr. Rajiv Shah, president of the Rockefeller Foundation and former USAID administrator.

Currently, only symptomatic people are frequently tested, meaning 40% to 50% of all spreaders, those who don't show symptoms, aren't being tested and told they may be contagious, he said.

"You have to know that as soon as possible, and then limit transmission from that node of contagion," he said during an Aspen Ideas webinar on Friday. "That's the whole ball game."

But even testing primarily symptomatic people been impacted by backlog, many states report.

The Virginia Department of Health reported a sharp increase of cases on Friday, but that increase came from a technical issue and a backlog from the two days prior, according to a statement.

And Miami-Dade County, the hotspot for cases in Florida, continues to struggle with a lag in testing results, according to state data obtained by CNN.

One day in the past week, testing labs reported that 19.2% of test results took more than seven days to deliver. On a different day, 45% of test results took between four and seven days.

Precautions matter for children, too
Researchers are learning more about how the virus spreads among children.

A new report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention supports the early belief that most coronavirus cases in children appear to be either asymptomatic or mild. But, the report said, when children are hospitalized, they need the intensive care unit as often as adults do.

To slow the pandemic, the CDC said children should be encouraged to wash their hands often, keep a good physical distance away from others, and if they are 2 years of age or older, they should wear a mask when they are around people outside of their family members.

One rare but serious complication children can develop from a coronavirus infection is known as multisystem inflammatory syndrome, or MIS-C, and at least 570 cases have been reported, the CDC said.

As the pandemic continues, health care providers should be on the lookout for the syndrome that most commonly causes abdominal pain, vomiting and a skin rash.

More than 74% of the cases were among Hispanic and Black children, the CDC said.

The report comes as schools reopen for the new school year, including in the largest school district in Georgia, where teachers are protesting the decision to resume in-person instruction on August 26, after just two weeks of online learning.

At least 263 Gwinnett County employees have already tested positive for Covid-19 or are in quarantine, and school hasn't even started.

"It seems like standardized test scores matter a whole lot to this county," teacher Brian Westlake told CNN's Natasha Chen. "But Covid test scores don't seem to matter enough."

Dr. Marybeth Sexton, an assistant professor of infectious disease at Emory University, warned that with community spread, there's a risk of students and staff showing up with Covid-19.

"With the degree of cases we're still seeing in the Metro Atlanta area and a lot of places throughout the United States, it means on the first day of classes, you're going to have a certain percentage of students and faculty who show up who are already infected," she said.

She said masks were vital for the safety of not only everyone in the school building, but also the wider community. "Those students are going home to family members who may be vulnerable, and the teachers, the school bus drivers, the school custodians, the people who work in the cafeteria -- all of those people are at risk, too."

Cases rise as country nears new milestone
State and local leaders across the country continue to try and contain the spread of the coronavirus as the number of US cases nears 5 million cases.

South Carolina's Department of Health and Environmental Control (DHEC) on Saturday announced a new "Fight the Spread" campaign, encouraging residents to wear masks, practice social distancing and get tested. The state reported 1,178 new cases, bringing the statewide total to more than 98,700, according to DHEC.

Wisconsin saw its highest daily new case count on Saturday, with 1,165 reported cases, according to the Wisconsin Department of Health Services, bringing the statewide total to 59,933 reported cases.

Illinois reported 2,190 new cases on Saturday -- the second day in a row that the state's health department reported more than 2,000 new Covid-19 positive cases. It was the highest daily reported case count since May 24, when the department reported 2,508 new cases. Statewide, there are more than 192,698 cases, according to the department of health.

Texas Gov. Greg Abbott extended his state's Covid-19 disaster declaration on Saturday, nearly 5 months after it was first issued on March 13 to help Texas counties fight the pandemic.

"I urge Texans to remain vigilant in our fight against this virus," Abbott said in a statement. "Everyone must do their part to slow the spread of COVID-19 by wearing a mask, practicing social distancing and washing your hands frequently and thoroughly."

source: https://www.msn.com/en-us/health/medical/americans-are-moving-around-too-much-and-taking-coronavirus-with-them-expert-says/ar-BB17It6c

Address

P.O. Box 1033
Albion, MI
49224

Alerts

Be the first to know and let us send you an email when Albion, Michigan News posts news and promotions. Your email address will not be used for any other purpose, and you can unsubscribe at any time.

Contact The Business

Send a message to Albion, Michigan News:

Videos

Mission, Vision, Principles, About and Rules.

Our Mission:

Albion Michigan News is a family first company, but our family includes our friends, churches, and other local businesses. We strive to provide the most accurate information, therefore, promoting community building and unification.

About AMN:

Albion Michigan News is 100% non-profit manned by a group of unpaid volunteers, we are far from perfect, and we try our best to stay neutral or unbiased. Still, there have been times, and there will be times when our authors will lean left or right of center unapologetically.

Our Vision:

We hope by providing a realistic look into life in Albion Michigan that we expose the outside world to the beauty of our uniqueness and diversity that we demonstrate our problem-solving abilities. Through home-grown artists, entrepreneurs, philanthropist, and scholars our differences make us great and even though we have different perspectives "We are Albion."

Our Principles:

The data accuracy that Albion Michigan News provides is through multiple gates of source verification and cross-checking facts. We ensure all sources are reliable and the stories posted have substantial evidence. Also if you don’t like it then don’t read it.

Page Rules from the Admins


  • No Hate Speech or Bullying: Make sure everyone feels safe. Bullying of any kind isn't allowed, and degrading comments about things like race, religion, culture, sexual orientation, gender will not be tolerated.
  • 2. No Spam: This Page runs off coffee and energy drinks, not money. Sorry Self-promotion, spam and irrelevant links in comments sections aren't allowed. We all hate spam. If you see it report it to us and someone on the team will take care of it.

    3. Respect Everyone's Privacy: Being part of this Page requires mutual trust. Authentic, meaningful discussions make pages great and build communities.

    4. Be Kind and Courteous: We're all in this together to create a welcoming environment Let's treat everyone with respect. Healthy debates are natural, but kindness is required. If one cannot refrain from trolling, baiting and fighting posts their posts will be deleted.

    5. Keep Conversations and Comments Civil: No Disrespecting others, personal attacks, antagonist behavior. Avoid making comments that incite. It may lead to being temporarily muted/cool off period. "If there's nothing nice to say....." else We will ban you without hesitation.

    6. Freedom of Speech - Heck Yes: Not in the form of bashing us, others, bashing community members, and groups. Any attempt to steer conversations away or incite non-professional behavior leads to actions equal to or higher than the level of negativity.

    7. Community Help: Do ask your fellow community members for help with community- oriented tasks and events. Also, use the Nextdoor App and "Our Albion Page" as venues for positive, progressive actions.

    9. Joining Albion Michigan News: By joining Albion Michigan News Group and or Page you acknowledge that you have read and agreed to the group and ore page rules. Even if you have not read these rules just by the use, you have, by default, agreed. You also have, by default, agree that any Contact with Albion Michigan News gives your consent to be quoted and published.

    10. If you do not like what you read on AMN, then do not read AMN. You are the one in control of your information intake.

    11. If you are rude, disrespectful, antagonistic, argumentative, attention-seeking, disruptive, all while making a nuisance of yourself will get you banned quickly from AMN. We don't get paid to put up with you.

    Nearby media companies


    Comments

    Where is the farmers market located?
    Things we didn’t learn in school that contribute to the way things are
    I'm not debating masks. Just reporting that had I known when I took my car into Albion College Chevy that 90% of the people there were not wearing masks. Not employees, not clients, not the two old guys who were just hanging around shooting the breeze with employees like it was an ol timey hardware store with checkers. I would have taken my car to a drive through Valvoline or Pennzoil. If you wouldn't feel comfortable/safe in that environment, now you know.
    is there a cat groomer in albion?
    Albion Public Safety officers are asking for the public's help locating two men wanted for questioning for a weekend shooting that left an Albion man in serious condition.
    Looking to donate preemie diapers to anyone in Albion who needs them. I have 6 unopened packages and one opened one. Also have (mostly pink) preemie clothes to donate. PM me if interested!
    #SuperiorMarch in Albion, June 19th!
    Does anyone else feel like they are losing their mind since all the Covid, social distancing, masks? I can't remember simple things, people's names, can't sleep through the night, stomach tied up in knots? All the recent violence and destruction of people's businesses, communities, innocent lives being taken especially children? I honestly hate no one. There are few people I dislike, 99 % of those people are the ones who have been labeled "white". Personally, my skin isn't white. I have a terrible time actually finding a make-up foundation that does truly match my skin color as I'm sure many others, with their own skin color, have a problem with also. So I guess I am truly "other" when you complete forms asking about your race/color. My skin color doesn't come close to the color of white copier paper. In the summer if the sun changes my skin I guess I would belong to the bronze race? Honestly don't know, just guessing. Race/color doesn't matter. We all bleed the same. We are all born, pay taxes and one day die. Because we, as a society, have chosen to accept our "labels" of color which society has taught us to accept we believe we are different from each other. Society, education, our elected officials, media have ingrained in us that WE are different and must remain so. Instead of feeling dislike, and hatred for one another we should be out raged buy Our Society, and those who create it (media, elected officials, dirty police officers, judges, attorneys, etc). Collectively, We should be going after Them. We pay their wages, often fund their retirement plans while They make decisions In Our Best Interested, without giving Us the right to decide or Tell them what IS Best for Us. I am more afraid of being pulled over by a "white" police officer than I am an officer of another color. Especially if I am carrying concealed. I agree the percentage of dirty officer's is small in comparison to those who simply want to serve us justly. There are dirty (meaning doing unethical things) people everywhere of every color, but a far greater number of "whites" simply due to our demographic of "color". I am appalled by much of our history, wealthy black's even had black slaves. None of it was right and never will be. Destroying our history makes people forget what truly happened making it more likely to possibly happen again (just my opinion). Who is suffering from this most? Our children! Innocent victims. This should outrage us. While media, elected officials, ect draw our attention away from what is happening to our most vulnerable (including our elderly many of whom have or are dying due to Covid positive people being moved to nursing homes), our children and being sold in droves. Our children are Our future. Unfortunately society is doing little to protect them. I'm sorry for my tangent. Everyday Our children are being stolen and sold into trafficking. Children of All colors. People We are taught to "trust" are the most deeply involved. I know this to be true because of an issue my husband and I had investigated for us. This was two years ago and it continues happening. Their investigation led them to fall upon it. One person is a black man the other white. The black man had his family pet killed and nailed to his door telling him to back off. The white man and his family also received threats, pictures of the wife shopping were left on her car windshield and his car torched. We didn't know what they'd uncover and certainly didn't expect what they found. We told them to stop investigating for their safety and ours. I'm sure we have been or are being watched. Cars park in front of our house frequently and just sit there. Michigan ranks like 5th in the nation for this despicable crime. Battle Creek appears to be our epicenter. This is all being investigated by people who work to uncover and bring to justice the individuals involved. The difficulty is identifying everyone who is involved. It's a very lucrative industry. Men and women are involved. This crime Does Not descriminate by color. It goes so deep it's hard to trace to the beginning point. It involves our "Trusted" judges, attorneys, politicians, doctors, CPS, police officers, and possibly a trusted neighborhood who behind closed doors is a pedophile. It is predominantly a White crime. I can't even begin to imagine what these innocent children endure, many who are never rescued alive, their tiny bodies possibly never found. This probably won't be approved for posting on our Albion FB. I hope it will be. We, as people of our communities and country must insist justice for our children. Force those involved to be criminally charged and imprisoned for life with No chance for parole. They'll get their just due from fellow inmates that Hate these kind of inmates. If We were all fighting against This cause rather than hating and fighting each other we'd realize we really are All the same. It's time to stop the agendas of our elected officials and Bring forth Our agendas as individuals, communities and citizens of this country. They don't own us! We own them! I love our small community of Albion, and all of us who make it what it is. God bless our children and All members of our community 🙏 May we have peace instead of hatred, killing and anger.
    Last chance to participate in the survey, which ends tomorrow: Working on development of a brand new fitness center in downtown. If you have any interest, please help us by taking the survey!
    🔴TOMORROW IS THE DAY!!!🔴 Label Shopper will reopen for business! My Team and I are excited to back at work and can’t wait to see everyone ❤️ Please stop in and see us. We will be putting out new merchandise everyday and we are expecting a new shipment of items next week! We’re open Monday-Friday 9am-8pm Saturday 10am-6pm and Sunday 12pm-5pm 1456 N Eaton St in Albion 1-517-629-3630 Please share and help us get the word out that we are back and open for business 😁
    Not Albion, but our neighbors. Maybe people might be interested in joining.