FEE Founded in 1946, the Foundation for Economic Education (FEE) supports the economic, legal, and ethical principles of a free society.
FEE, the first free-market organization in the United States, was founded in 1946 by Leonard E. Read to study and advance the freedom philosophy. FEE has published or hosted lectures by some of the finest minds of the modern age, including Ludwig von Mises, F.A. Hayek, Henry Hazlitt, Milton Friedman, James Buchanan, Vernon Smith, Israel Kirzner, Walter Williams, George Stigler, Frank Chodorov, John Chamberlain, F.A. “Baldy” Harper, and William F. Buckley, Jr., among many others. FEE is a non-political, non-profit, tax-exempt educational foundation and accepts no taxpayer money. FEE is supported solely by contributions from private individuals, foundations, and businesses and by the sale of our publications. FEE is proud to adhere to the strictest of standards in financial and programmatic transparency, earning among the highest ratings from both Charity Navigator and GuideStar.
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FEE's mission is inspire, educate, and connect young adults, ages 14-26, with the economic, ethical, and legal principles of a free society. These principles include individual liberty, free-market economics, entrepreneurship, private property, high moral character, and limited government. FEE envisions a world where the ideas of liberty are familiar and credible to the rising generation. We believe that the free society is the only social arrangement compatible with the humane values and ethical principles of the vast majority of people, particularly those held by members of the rising generation. FEE produces nationwide seminars, classroom resources, social media, free online courses, and engaging daily content at FEE.org–all educating on the ideas of a free society. Additionally, FEE supports and connects our alumni through the FEE Alumni Network, provides professional opportunities through internships, and recognizes our most extraordinary alumni leaders with the annual Leonard E. Read Distinguished Alumni Award.

Mission: The Foundation for Economic Education (FEE) is a non-political, non-profit, tax-exempt educational foundation and has been trusted since 1946 to captivate and inspire tomorrow’s leaders with sound economic principles and the entrepreneurial spirit with free online courses, top-rated in-person seminars, free books for classrooms, as well as relevant and worldly daily online content. FEE's mission is to inspire, educate, and connect future leaders with the economic, ethical, and legal principles of a free society. These principles include: individual liberty, free-market economics, entrepreneurship, private property, high moral character, and limited government.

05/02/2020
This Movie Offends You? Good.

From new movie releases like JoJo Rabbit to modern classics like Blazing Saddles, The Producers, and Team America: World Police -- and, of course, centuries-old landmark works such as Jonathan Swift’s “A Modest Proposal” -- satire has helped us examine real social and political topics using humor that’s often absurd… and sometimes offensive.

Satire and its cousins like irony allow us to grapple with some of our most dangerous, difficult ideas, and the audio-visual medium of film gives ample opportunity to explore complex, and often uncomfortable, themes. Films like JoJo Rabbit, in which a young German boy has an imaginary friend in the form of a murderous dictator, can employ stinging jokes, ridiculous plots, and farcical characters that address serious issues.

It is, in a word, speech -- and the freedom of speech that allows for satirical novels and boundary-pushing movies is critical to our using creativity to advance the social and political dialogue that improves our world.

And yes, many times that speech can be offensive. It can be inappropriate. It can upset us. But its importance is why we're going to get into the complex and hotly debated subject of freedom of speech… on this episode of Out of Frame.

In "protecting" people from enjoying the outdoors during social distancing, is our fear simply creating a dangerously un...
05/01/2020
COVID-19 Lockdowns May Destroy Our Immune Systems

In "protecting" people from enjoying the outdoors during social distancing, is our fear simply creating a dangerously unhealthy society? Too much protection might later turn out to be as harmful as refusing to take reasonable coronavirus precautions.

Via: Intellectual Takeout https://bit.ly/3bTVkpj

The coronavirus shutdowns may be counterproductive not just from an economic standpoint, but also in preventing the spread of disease long term.

Where's the beef? Probably going rancid somewhere, thanks to our central planners."In the same way that each person is s...
05/01/2020
Meat Supply Disruptions Are the Bitter Harvest of the “Non-Essential Worker” Fallacy | Antony Davies, James R. Harrigan

Where's the beef? Probably going rancid somewhere, thanks to our central planners.

"In the same way that each person is supposedly connected to every other by no more than six degrees of separation, each business is connected to every other in exactly the same way. We cannot declare one business “unnecessary” without, by extension, declaring unnecessary every other business that relies on it, and every business that relies on those businesses. Food is necessary, and because of that delivery trucks are necessary, and because of that engine fuses and wiper blades are necessary, and because of that plastic packaging in which fuses and blades are sold is necessary, and on and on. Our economy is not a series of individual supply chains. It is a single, unified supply web. Cut the web in any place and the whole structure weakens.

And politicians have been cutting the web in myriad ways since this began. And what has happened? Food is not being delivered, and now politicians wonder why. What they really need is a mirror and an introductory economics text."

In the same way that each person is supposedly connected to every other by no more than six degrees of separation, each business is connected to every other in exactly the same way. We cannot declare one business “unnecessary” without, by extension, declaring unnecessary every other business tha...

Tune in TODAY at 12pm ET for a live interview between John Stossel and Words & Numbers hosts James Harrigan and Antony D...
05/01/2020
Live Stream | Stossel in the Classroom

Tune in TODAY at 12pm ET for a live interview between John Stossel and Words & Numbers hosts James Harrigan and Antony Davies.

https://bit.ly/2xkAYXe

Stossel in the Classroom meets Words & Numbers Streaming Live at 12:00PM ET on Friday, May 1st Click here to submit a question.

The coronavirus pandemic has certainly not been easy on the U.S. Postal Service (USPS), which was bleeding red ink even ...
05/01/2020
No, An All-Electric Fleet Won’t Save the U.S. Postal Service | Ross Marchand

The coronavirus pandemic has certainly not been easy on the U.S. Postal Service (USPS), which was bleeding red ink even before the start of the crisis. The USPS needs to pursue cost-conscious fleet purchases that won’t break the bank and lead to a $75 billion taxpayer bailout.

The coronavirus pandemic has certainly not been easy on the U.S. Postal Service (USPS), which was bleeding red ink even before the start of the crisis. The USPS needs to pursue cost-conscious fleet purchases that won’t break the bank and lead to a $75 billion taxpayer bailout.

05/01/2020
The FDA Is Killing People, and Has Been for Years

FDA regulations and red tape have hobbled the response to COVID-19 and our ability to test, treat, and prevent its spread, leading to unnecessary infections and death.

Unfortunately, this isn't a new phenomenon. History, and the movie Dallas Buyers Club, shows us how.

05/01/2020
The FDA Is Killing People, and Has Been for Years

The US government has really dropped the ball on handling COVID-19. FDA regulations and red tape have hobbled the response to the virus and our ability to test, treat, and prevent its spread, leading to unnecessary infections and death.

Unfortunately, this isn't a new phenomenon. History, and the movie Dallas Buyers Club, shows us how.

Locke's writings did much to inspire the American Revolution—and they're just as relevant today.
04/30/2020
John Locke: Natural Rights to Life, Liberty, and Property | Jim Powell

Locke's writings did much to inspire the American Revolution—and they're just as relevant today.

A number of times throughout history, tyranny has stimulated breakthrough thinking about liberty. This was certainly the case in England with the mid-17th-century era of repression, rebellion, and civil war. There was a tremendous outpouring of political pamphlets and tracts. By far the most influen...

04/30/2020
What Cobras Can Teach Us About Incentives

One of the most essential concepts of economics is that humans respond to incentives.

Seamus tells Bob a few stories about incentives in action, featuring cobras, rats, dolphins, and pigs.

“What it has done differently is it has very much relied on its relationship with its citizenry and the ability and will...
04/30/2020
WHO Official: Sweden’s Policy of Individual Responsibility “a Model” for the Rest of World | Jon Miltimore

“What it has done differently is it has very much relied on its relationship with its citizenry and the ability and willingness of its citizens to implement self-distancing and self-regulate,” WHO's Dr. Mike Ryan said. “In that sense, they have implemented public policy through that partnership with the population.”

Partnership is the key word. Sweden isn’t simply issuing sweeping orders and fining or arresting those who disobey. Instead, Swedish leaders are seeking to work in cooperation with its citizenry. They are giving them information and asking them to behave responsibly.

“What it has done differently is it has very much relied on its relationship with its citizenry and the ability and willingness of its citizens to implement self-distancing and self-regulate,” WHO's Dr. Mike Ryan said. “In that sense, they have implemented public policy through that partnershi...

Would you say that you were taught how to think in school? ⁣#RevolutionOfOne
04/30/2020

Would you say that you were taught how to think in school? ⁣

#RevolutionOfOne

Americans are uniquely privileged, to the point of simply imagining they can stay home for months and months without suf...
04/30/2020
Will It Take Food Shortages to End Support for the Shutdown? | Jeff Deist

Americans are uniquely privileged, to the point of simply imagining they can stay home for months and months without suffering severe economic hardship as a result.

Our unique privilege is delusion, the mentality that America is rich and will remain rich without particular effort on our part. Abundance simply materializes around us, regardless of incentives, and the job of politicians is to rearrange this abundance more equitably.

Via: Mises Institute

https://bit.ly/2zCQZZ8

Americans are uniquely privileged, to the point of simply imagining they can stay home for months and months without suffering severe economic hardship as a result. Our unique privilege is delusion, the mentality that America is rich and will remain rich without particular effort on our part. Abunda...

The remarks of the Bakersfield doctors are probably a mix of truths and errors. YouTube's removal of the video does the ...
04/30/2020
YouTube’s Censorship of Dissenting Doctors Will Backfire | Dan Sanchez

The remarks of the Bakersfield doctors are probably a mix of truths and errors. YouTube's removal of the video does the public a disservice in both regards.

To the extent that they are wrong, their errors should be aired out and refuted. Any mistake the doctors made will probably be made again, since the human mind tends to fall prey to the same basic fallacies. By developing and disseminating counter-arguments (mental antibodies) to them, we develop our immunity to these and similar errors.

By sheltering us from the videos, YouTube has limited the extent to which that social learning can happen and insulated any error from debunking.

Moreover, even if the physicians are wrong in some ways (like in their statistical claims), they may be right in other important ways.

Wrong orthodoxies are far more dangerous than wrong heresies, simply as a matter of the scale of the error’s impact. That is yet another reason why open discourse is so vital. For the sake of human welfare, orthodox falsehoods need to be overthrown, and heretical truths need to spread.

The remarks of the Bakersfield doctors are probably a mix of truths and errors. YouTube's removal of the video does the public a disservice in both regards. To the extent that they are wrong, their errors should be aired out and refuted. Any mistake the doctors made will probably be made again, sinc...

Despite the eerie silence in public spaces, despite the preventable deaths that should weigh heavily on the consciences ...
04/30/2020
Are We Living In a Dystopia?

Despite the eerie silence in public spaces, despite the preventable deaths that should weigh heavily on the consciences of public officials, even despite the authoritarian tendencies of too many leaders, the U.S. is not a dystopia – yet.

Via: Intellectual Takeout

https://bit.ly/2zKxWMJ

With the width and breadth of government mandated shutdowns of America, some people are concerned the United States is fast becoming a dystopia.

There may be many facets to their agenda, but the ones I find most troubling are the efforts to weaken both American fam...
04/30/2020
Harvard Kennedy School To Host Conference Addressing the Campaign against Homeschooling Rights | Kerry McDonald

There may be many facets to their agenda, but the ones I find most troubling are the efforts to weaken both American families and the U.S. Constitution. In Bartholet’s recent Arizona Law Review article that underpins the Harvard Magazine polemic, the law professor calls the U.S. Constitution “outdated and inadequate.” She advocates for a reinterpretation of the Constitution that moves from its historic model of “negative rights,” or of individuals being free from state intrusion, to “positive rights” in which the state grants rights and takes a more interventionist role in American life—in particular in the lives of families and children.

There may be many facets to their agenda, but the ones I find most troubling are the efforts to weaken both American families and the U.S. Constitution. In Bartholet’s recent Arizona Law Review article that underpins the Harvard Magazine polemic, the law professor calls the U.S. Constitution “ou...

George Washington was inaugurated as America's first president on this day in 1789.
04/30/2020
Why You Should Pay Attention to George Washington's Warning on Disunity | Richard Lim

George Washington was inaugurated as America's first president on this day in 1789.

For most of American history, the Farewell Address was required reading in grade schools across the nation and was continually invoked in the public discourse.  Yet, in recent decades, the address has faded into obscurity. That’s a shame, as it is a treasure trove of wisdom from the man who did t...

04/30/2020
A Definitive History of Streaming Media

Disney+ is the latest development in an incredible wave of innovation in home entertainment that started decades ago. From Blockbuster to Netflix, to Amazon Prime and Hulu, we've gotten better and more impressive options year after year. None of this would have been possible without visionary entrepreneurs operating in a free market economy.

In this episode of Out of Frame, we present a detailed history of streaming services while explaining the role of the entrepreneur in society, the importance of price signals, and why monopolies don't last very long without legal protection.

America significantly outperforms Canada in surgery wait times even as it’s likely that tens of thousands of Canadians c...
04/29/2020
America Outperforms Canada in Surgery Wait Times—And It's Not Even Close | Kevin Pham

America significantly outperforms Canada in surgery wait times even as it’s likely that tens of thousands of Canadians come here to get surgery.

America’s health system is certainly flawed and in need of reform, but there is clearly something working well enough that our system, despite already treating ten times more cases of appendicitis, can absorb the dissatisfied Canadians.

04/29/2020
No Policy Can Save Lives; It Can Only Trade Lives

In times of crisis, politicians want to look like they’re doing something, and don’t want to hear about limits on their authority. In times of crisis, people want someone to do something, and don’t want to hear about tradeoffs. This is the breeding ground for grand policies driven by the mantra, “if it saves just one life.”

Read more: https://bit.ly/2W6IHR3

“Our vision for the future is that students will have a self-sovereign student identity where all of their educational c...
04/29/2020
Blockchain-Based Credentials May Rise as COVID-19 Accelerates Online Education | Andrew Hayward

“Our vision for the future is that students will have a self-sovereign student identity where all of their educational certifications are completely owned, controlled, and managed by themselves,” says John Domingue, director of the Knowledge Media Institute at the Open University.

“Our vision for the future is that students will have a self-sovereign student identity where all of their educational certifications are completely owned, controlled, and managed by themselves,” says John Domingue, director of the Knowledge Media Institute at the Open University.

If the COVID-19 pandemic has demonstrated anything, it is that there is no situation so severe that government can't mak...
04/29/2020
For Better Health, Find a Cure for Government

If the COVID-19 pandemic has demonstrated anything, it is that there is no situation so severe that government can't make it worse. Government's recent crimes are legion: standing in the way of testing; complicating efforts to acquire protective equipment; imposing authoritarian and uniform lockdown rules across very different populations; and enforcing those rules in dangerous and ill-considered ways.

If you can assess the conduct of government officials through the pandemic and conclude that what we really need is more of that, then we're probably going to cure the novel coronavirus long before we find a treatment for whatever it is that ails you.

Via: Reason Magazine https://bit.ly/3cZ7xch

In a time of health crisis, government has proven to be a crippling underlying condition.

Are hospitals conspiring to gin up COVID-19 deaths to make the pandemic look worse than it is? No. There’s a simpler exp...
04/29/2020
Physicians Say Hospitals Are Pressuring ER Docs to List COVID-19 on Death Certificates. Here’s Why | Jon Miltimore

Are hospitals conspiring to gin up COVID-19 deaths to make the pandemic look worse than it is? No. There’s a simpler explanation: incentives.

As Minnesota lawmaker and longtime family practitioner Dr. Scott Jensen recently observed, hospitals are incentivized to pressure physicians to include COVID-19 on death certificates and discharge papers, since the CARES Act increases Medicare payments to hospitals treating COVID-19 victims.

Are hospitals conspiring to gin up COVID-19 deaths to make the pandemic look worse than it is? No. There’s a simpler explanation: incentives. As Minnesota lawmaker and longtime family practitioner Dr. Scott Jensen recently observed, hospitals are incentivized to pressure physicians to include COVI...

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FEE's mission is inspire, educate, and connect young adults, ages 14-26, with the economic, ethical, and legal principles of a free society. These principles include individual liberty, free-market economics, entrepreneurship, private property, high moral character, and limited government. FEE envisions a world where the ideas of liberty are familiar, credible and compelling to the rising generation. We believe that the free society is the only social arrangement compatible with the humane values and ethical principles of the vast majority of people, particularly those held by members of the rising generation. FEE produces nationwide seminars, classroom resources, social media, free online courses, and engaging daily content at FEE.org–all educating on the ideas of a free society. Additionally, FEE supports and connects our alumni through the FEE Alumni Network, provides professional opportunities through internships, and recognizes our most extraordinary alumni leaders with the annual Leonard E. Read Distinguished Alumni Award.

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What is this page's analysis of the Tiananmen square massacre in china in 1989?
Hi FEE! Will there be a recording of "How can the freedom movement mobilize during and after the COVID-19 crisis?" I had to miss the Zoom meeting because of another Zoom meeting for my job. 😢
As much as I like the Baltics I think this article is leaving out that they got a lot of help for years from the EU.
You know all those states and cities passing anti-"price gouging" laws? Remember all those who say that raising prices will not prevent shortages?
It is almost Spring! Some horny male bird won't let me sleep, chirping loudly for tail. Hope a girl shows soon! Shut up, Studly!
A great resource for those that want to teach economics to younger kids are the Tuttle Twins Series of books. I use these particular books in my classroom which teach about basic economic ideas such as: free markets, inflation, capitalism, socialism, monopolies, entrepreneurship, and much more! These books are easy to understand and my students love them.
Spouse is watching "Self Made: Inspired by the Life of Madam C.J. Walker." Thought you might have had something to say about this so I searched on your web-page: "About 289 results (0.28 seconds)"
Please consider withdrawing your emailed article today about coronavirus. Please consider this http://city-countyobserver.com/a-very-important-read-concerning-much-confusion-misinformation-and-denial-on-social-media-about-coronavirus/ “As there is so much confusion, misinformation and denial on social media about the coronavirus we hope to explain, in plain language, why the experts see this as such an emergency. Many people are reading the claim online that this virus is a lot like the viruses that cause colds, and that if you get it, it will probably just seem like a bad cold and you are very unlikely to die. Depending on who you are, this may be true, but there is more to this story that is key to our outcome as a community. This is a coronavirus that is new to the human population. Although it is related to the viruses that cause colds, and acts a lot like them in many ways, nobody has ever been exposed to this before, which means nobody has any immunity to it.The virus is now moving explosively through the human population, spreading through respiratory secretions and 10 times more contagious that the flu or cold. Although many people will recover, about 20% will wind up with a serious pneumonia that will require hospitalization. Some will be so ill from the pneumonia that they will die. We estimate this may be 2-3%, but it is higher in Italy’s experience, partially because the healthcare system was overwhelmed so rapidly. In those over age 70, the death rate is 8-20%.So if a child catches it on a playdate, they can easily transmit it to their grandmother as easily as touching the same doorknob or countertop.Scientists measure the spread of an epidemic by a number called R0, or “R naught.” That number is calculated this way: for every person who develops the illness, how many other people do they give it to before they are cured (or dead) and no longer infectious? The R0 for coronavirus appears to be a number close to 3 – an extremely frightening number for such a deadly disease.Suppose you catch the virus. You will give it to 3 other people, and they will each give it to three others, and so forth. Here is how the math works, where you, the “index case,” are the first line:1 3 9 27 81 243 729 2,187 6,561 19,683 59,046 177,147 531,441 1,594,323 4,782,969 14,348,907So, in just 15 steps of transmission, the virus has gone from just one index case to 14.3 million other people. Those 15 steps might take only a few weeks. With school out and lots of playdates, maybe less. The first person may be young and healthy Brookline child, but many of those 14 million people will be old and sick, and they will likely die because they got a virus that started in one person's throat.R0 is not fixed – it can be lowered by control measures. If we can get the number below 1, the epidemic will die out. This is the point of the quarantines and social distancing, but we are not doing it fast enough.In the US, we have to slow down the virus. American hospitals, Boston hospitals, have limited resources. We have a fixed number of ventilators and an impending calamity on our hands. Our Italian critical care colleagues have shared with us that they simply do not have enough resources (ventilators, physicians and nurse, critical care beds), and are forced to choose who lives and dies based on old tenets of wartime triage.Older patients do not even get a ventilator and die of their pneumonia. These are decisions nobody should have to face, and we are only 11 days behind Italy’s fate. Their hospitals are quite advanced, and we are no better in Boston. As doctors, we are desperately trying to prepare for the onslaught of patients in the coming weeks. It is already beginning. This is an opportunity for you as the district leadership the time to be aggressive and help us fight this by “Flattening the Curve”.We implore you, as a group of Boston’s doctors preparing to fight this, to help us. Please send a new email to ALL the Brookline school district families. Social distancing is painful. We know that kids have cabin fever, they are pleading to see their friends, they may have birthday parties coming up or special events they have been looking forward to. All of us need to work and childcare is a big worry. But we need to overcome these issues and boredom for the coming weeks so that we can survive this with as few deaths as possible. What does that mean?1) No playdates, not even 1:1. 2) No small gatherings, no meetings between a couple families, even for birthday parties. 3) Avoid trampoline parks, climbing gyms, restaurants, movie theaters, anything in an enclosed area. Many of these places are advertising increased cleaning and hygiene. This is not sufficient! Do not go. 4) Cancel planned vacations for the next month. Avoid airline travel that is not an emergency. Many airlines and rental agencies are offering penalty free cancellations. 5) Stay at home as much as possible. Work from home if you possibly can. You may have to go buy groceries and medicine, of course, but make the trips quick and purposeful. 6) Wash your hands thoroughly after you have been in public places, for a full 20 seconds, soaping up thoroughly and being sure to get between the fingers. 7) Please avoid disseminating social media claims that the situation is not serious or is being exaggerated. This is a national crisis and conveying misinformation to your friends and family may put their lives in danger.Thank you for taking the time to read this and stay safe and healthy in the coming weeks.”Respectfully, Erika Rangel, MD, Director of Surgical Critical Care, Brigham and Women’s Faulkner Hospital Shawn Rangel, MD, Pediatric Surgery, Children’s Hospital Boston Asaf Bitton, MD, Executive Director Ariadne Labs and Internal Medicine, BWH Daniel O’connor, MD, Pediatrics, Longwood Pediatrics and Children’s Hospital Boston Beth O’connor, MD, Pediatrics, Roslindale Pediatrics Vandana Madhavan, MD, Clinical Director of Pediatric Infectious Disease, MGH Parag Amin, MD, Pediatrics, Centre Pediatrics Christy Cummings, MD, Neonatology, Children’s Hospital Boston Eric Bluman, MD, Orthopedic Surgery, BWH Trimble Augur, MD, Internal Medicine, Hebrew Rehabilitation Center Dasha Weir, MD, Pediatric gastroenterology Amy Evenson Warren, Transplant Surgery, BIDMC William Oldham, MD, PhD, Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, BWH James Kryzanski, MD, Neurosurgery, Tufts Medical Center Ben Zendejas-Mummert, MD, Pediatric Surgery, Children’s Hospital Boston Johanna Iturrino Moreda, MD, Gastroenterology, BIDMC David Berg, MD, Cardiology and Cardiac Critical Care, BWH Jennifer Crombie, MD, Hematology Oncology, BWH Jenifer Lightdale, MD, Chief of Pediatric Gastroenterology, U Mass Memorial Hospital Wayne Tworetzky, MD, Pediatric Cardiology, Children’s Hospital Boston Elaine Yu, MD, Endocrinology Jonathan Li, Infectious Disease Nancy Cho, MD, Surgical Oncology, BWH Eric Sheu, MD, Minimally Invasive Surgery, BWH Reza Askari, MD, Director, Surgical Critical Care, BWH Cindy Lien, MD, Internal Medicine and Palliative Care, BIDMC Hannah Parker, MD, OB/GYN Alysa E. Doyle, PhD, Center for Genomic Medicine, MGH Christopher Smith, MD, Internal Medicine, Charles River Medical Associates, Wellesley, MA Maya Greer, NP, Children’s Hospital Boston Rusty Jennings, MD, Pediatric Surgery, Children’s Hospital Boston Emily Oken, MD, Professor of Population Medicine, BWH Chinwe Ukomadu, MD, Head of Clinical Hepatology, Novartis Jennifer Kaufman, MD, Internal Medicine, BWH Ann Poduri, MD, MPH, Pediatric Neurology Susan Yehle Ritter, MD, Rheumatology Diego Martinucci, MD Psychiatry, Atrius Health Shih-Ning Liaw, MD, Pediatric Palliative Care, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute/Boston Children’s Hospital Wolfram Goessling, MD, Gastroenterology and Oncology, MGH Paola Daza, Pediatrics, MGH Juan Matute, Neonatology, MGH John Ross, MD, Internal Medicine, BWH Megan Sandel, MD, Pediatrics, Boston Medical Center Kathy Calvillo, MD, Surgery, BWH Christine Greco, MD, Anesthesia, Children’s Hospital Boston Niteesh Choudhry, MD, PhD, Internal Medicine, BWH and Harvard T.H. Chand School of Public Health Chandru Krishnan, MD, Ophthalmology, Tufts Medical Center Amy Ship, MD, Internal Medicine, Associate Director of Medical Education, Atrius Health Yen-Lin Evelyn Chen, MD, Radiation Oncology, MGH Daihung Do, MD, Dermatology, BIDMC Chloe Zera, MD, MPH, Maternal Fetal Medicine, BIDMC Alejandra Barrero-Castillero, MD, MPH, Neonatology, Children’s Hospital Boston Jesse Esch, MD, Pediatric Cardiology, Children’s Hospital Boston Alison Packard, MD, OB/GYN, MGH Vik Khurana, MD PhD, Chief Division of Movement Disorders, BWH Tu-Mai Tran, MD, MSc, Family Medicine, BMC Yu Liu, MD PhD, Internal Medicine, Bristol Myers Squibb Yih-Chieh Chen, MD Lily Li, MD, Allergy and Immunology, BWH “As there is so much confusion, misinformation and denial on social media about the coronavirus we hope to explain, in plain language, why the experts see this as such an emergency. Many people are reading the claim online that this virus is a lot like the viruses that cause colds, and that if you get it, it will probably just seem like a bad cold and you are very unlikely to die. Depending on who you are, this may be true, but there is more to this story that is key to our outcome as a community. This is a coronavirus that is new to the human population. Although it is related to the viruses that cause colds, and acts a lot like them in many ways, nobody has ever been exposed to this before, which means nobody has any immunity to it.The virus is now moving explosively through the human population, spreading through respiratory secretions and 10 times more contagious that the flu or cold. Although many people will recover, about 20% will wind up with a serious pneumonia that will require hospitalization. Some will be so ill from the pneumonia that they will die. We estimate this may be 2-3%, but it is higher in Italy’s experience, partially because the healthcare system was overwhelmed so rapidly. In those over age 70, the death rate is 8-20%.So if a child catches it on a playdate, they can easily transmit it to their grandmother as easily as touching the same doorknob or countertop.Scientists measure the spread of an epidemic by a number called R0, or “R naught.” That number is calculated this way: for every person who develops the illness, how many other people do they give it to before they are cured (or dead) and no longer infectious? The R0 for coronavirus appears to be a number close to 3 – an extremely frightening number for such a deadly disease.Suppose you catch the virus. You will give it to 3 other people, and they will each give it to three others, and so forth. Here is how the math works, where you, the “index case,” are the first line:1 3 9 27 81 243 729 2,187 6,561 19,683 59,046 177,147 531,441 1,594,323 4,782,969 14,348,907So, in just 15 steps of transmission, the virus has gone from just one index case to 14.3 million other people. Those 15 steps might take only a few weeks. With school out and lots of playdates, maybe less. The first person may be young and healthy Brookline child, but many of those 14 million people will be old and sick, and they will likely die because they got a virus that started in one person's throat.R0 is not fixed – it can be lowered by control measures. If we can get the number below 1, the epidemic will die out. This is the point of the quarantines and social distancing, but we are not doing it fast enough.In the US, we have to slow down the virus. American hospitals, Boston hospitals, have limited resources. We have a fixed number of ventilators and an impending calamity on our hands. Our Italian critical care colleagues have shared with us that they simply do not have enough resources (ventilators, physicians and nurse, critical care beds), and are forced to choose who lives and dies based on old tenets of wartime triage.Older patients do not even get a ventilator and die of their pneumonia. These are decisions nobody should have to face, and we are only 11 days behind Italy’s fate. Their hospitals are quite advanced, and we are no better in Boston. As doctors, we are desperately trying to prepare for the onslaught of patients in the coming weeks. It is already beginning. This is an opportunity for you as the district leadership the time to be aggressive and help us fight this by “Flattening the Curve”.We implore you, as a group of Boston’s doctors preparing to fight this, to help us. Please send a new email to ALL the Brookline school district families. Social distancing is painful. We know that kids have cabin fever, they are pleading to see their friends, they may have birthday parties coming up or special events they have been looking forward to. All of us need to work and childcare is a big worry. But we need to overcome these issues and boredom for the coming weeks so that we can survive this with as few deaths as possible. What does that mean?1) No playdates, not even 1:1. 2) No small gatherings, no meetings between a couple families, even for birthday parties. 3) Avoid trampoline parks, climbing gyms, restaurants, movie theaters, anything in an enclosed area. Many of these places are advertising increased cleaning and hygiene. This is not sufficient! Do not go. 4) Cancel planned vacations for the next month. Avoid airline travel that is not an emergency. Many airlines and rental agencies are offering penalty free cancellations. 5) Stay at home as much as possible. Work from home if you possibly can. You may have to go buy groceries and medicine, of course, but make the trips quick and purposeful. 6) Wash your hands thoroughly after you have been in public places, for a full 20 seconds, soaping up thoroughly and being sure to get between the fingers. 7) Please avoid disseminating social media claims that the situation is not serious or is being exaggerated. This is a national crisis and conveying misinformation to your friends and family may put their lives in danger.Thank you for taking the time to read this and stay safe and healthy in the coming weeks.”Respectfully, Erika Rangel, MD, Director of Surgical Critical Care, Brigham and Women’s Faulkner Hospital Shawn Rangel, MD, Pediatric Surgery, Children’s Hospital Boston Asaf Bitton, MD, Executive Director Ariadne Labs and Internal Medicine, BWH Daniel O’connor, MD, Pediatrics, Longwood Pediatrics and Children’s Hospital Boston Beth O’connor, MD, Pediatrics, Roslindale Pediatrics Vandana Madhavan, MD, Clinical Director of Pediatric Infectious Disease, MGH Parag Amin, MD, Pediatrics, Centre Pediatrics Christy Cummings, MD, Neonatology, Children’s Hospital Boston Eric Bluman, MD, Orthopedic Surgery, BWH Trimble Augur, MD, Internal Medicine, Hebrew Rehabilitation Center Dasha Weir, MD, Pediatric gastroenterology Amy Evenson Warren, Transplant Surgery, BIDMC William Oldham, MD, PhD, Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, BWH James Kryzanski, MD, Neurosurgery, Tufts Medical Center Ben Zendejas-Mummert, MD, Pediatric Surgery, Children’s Hospital Boston Johanna Iturrino Moreda, MD, Gastroenterology, BIDMC David Berg, MD, Cardiology and Cardiac Critical Care, BWH Jennifer Crombie, MD, Hematology Oncology, BWH Jenifer Lightdale, MD, Chief of Pediatric Gastroenterology, U Mass Memorial Hospital Wayne Tworetzky, MD, Pediatric Cardiology, Children’s Hospital Boston Elaine Yu, MD, Endocrinology Jonathan Li, Infectious Disease Nancy Cho, MD, Surgical Oncology, BWH Eric Sheu, MD, Minimally Invasive Surgery, BWH Reza Askari, MD, Director, Surgical Critical Care, BWH Cindy Lien, MD, Internal Medicine and Palliative Care, BIDMC Hannah Parker, MD, OB/GYN Alysa E. Doyle, PhD, Center for Genomic Medicine, MGH Christopher Smith, MD, Internal Medicine, Charles River Medical Associates, Wellesley, MA Maya Greer, NP, Children’s Hospital Boston Rusty Jennings, MD, Pediatric Surgery, Children’s Hospital Boston Emily Oken, MD, Professor of Population Medicine, BWH Chinwe Ukomadu, MD, Head of Clinical Hepatology, Novartis Jennifer Kaufman, MD, Internal Medicine, BWH Ann Poduri, MD, MPH, Pediatric Neurology Susan Yehle Ritter, MD, Rheumatology Diego Martinucci, MD Psychiatry, Atrius Health Shih-Ning Liaw, MD, Pediatric Palliative Care, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute/Boston Children’s Hospital Wolfram Goessling, MD, Gastroenterology and Oncology, MGH Paola Daza, Pediatrics, MGH Juan Matute, Neonatology, MGH John Ross, MD, Internal Medicine, BWH Megan Sandel, MD, Pediatrics, Boston Medical Center Kathy Calvillo, MD, Surgery, BWH Christine Greco, MD, Anesthesia, Children’s Hospital Boston Niteesh Choudhry, MD, PhD, Internal Medicine, BWH and Harvard T.H. Chand School of Public Health Chandru Krishnan, MD, Ophthalmology, Tufts Medical Center Amy Ship, MD, Internal Medicine, Associate Director of Medical Education, Atrius Health Yen-Lin Evelyn Chen, MD, Radiation Oncology, MGH Daihung Do, MD, Dermatology, BIDMC Chloe Zera, MD, MPH, Maternal Fetal Medicine, BIDMC Alejandra Barrero-Castillero, MD, MPH, Neonatology, Children’s Hospital Boston Jesse Esch, MD, Pediatric Cardiology, Children’s Hospital Boston Alison Packard, MD, OB/GYN, MGH Vik Khurana, MD PhD, Chief Division of Movement Disorders, BWH Tu-Mai Tran, MD, MSc, Family Medicine, BMC Yu Liu, MD PhD, Internal Medicine, Bristol Myers Squibb Yih-Chieh Chen, MD Lily Li, MD, Allergy and Immunology, BWH