Center for Communication

Center for Communication The Center for Communication inspires and educates the next generation of media leaders.
The Center for Communication is a nonprofit dedicated to increasing diversity, promoting inclusivity, and expanding access to opportunity in the media industry. Through our series of free educational programs, we put thousands of students each year in the room with leading creators, innovators, and executives in journalism, media, marketing, entertainment and related fields. We enable our community to gain essential career guidance and hands-on experience they won’t find in any classroom. Ours is a “center without walls”—a vital forum for the best minds in the business to inspire and connect with the next generation of media leaders.
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The Center educates tomorrow’s media professionals by connecting students to leaders from all fields of the industry to better prepare them for future careers. The Center for Communication was founded in 1980 by renowned CBS president Frank Stanton to bridge the gap between the communications industry and colleges and universities.

Operating as usual

09/01/2020
Being "The Only" In The Room

At our last annual Diversity + Media Career Summit, Angela Talton, former Chief Diversity Officer at Nielsen, addressed the question of “being the only” in the room. A student asks, “How can you still make your voice heard while not feeling like you have to be a representative for your community?” Her advice is to get beyond the anxiety of being "the only" in the room and try to take in as much as possible: “go back to being a student. See being "the only" in the room as a positive and another opportunity to learn.

Ms. Talton advises that you move beyond the anxiety of being "the only" in the room and try to take in as much as possible. How are you navigating the room? How are you networking? Who are the important brokers in the room? Who do I need to know? Even paying attention to things like, ‘How are you investing your money? What stocks are you looking at? Who are some of the companies that you pay close attention? What are you reading?’ That’s what she started doing with those opportunities. Going back to being a student and learning everything you can possibly learn from those people in the room. https://vimeo.com/385279703

At our annual Diversity + Media Career Summit, Angela Talton, former Chief Diversity Officer at Nielsen, addresses the commonly faced issue for BIPOC of being tokenized…

Maya Rudolph’s first auditions were usually for parts in commercials or music videos.It was the mid-90s when she snagged...
09/01/2020
Maya Rudolph Has to Keep Reminding Herself She’s Not Kamala Harris (Watch)

Maya Rudolph’s first auditions were usually for parts in commercials or music videos.

It was the mid-90s when she snagged work as an extra in a Dr. Dre video. “It was a night shoot and we got paid nothing,” Rudolph recalls on Thursday’s episode of the Variety and iHeart podcast “The Big Ticket.” “They were like, ‘You’ll be walking where that liquid is, which was where they were dumping the porta potties.’ And I was like, ‘I’ll be in my car.’ So I slept in my car for the whole night of the shoot and then got my money and then went home.”

Fast forward to today. Rudolph is up for three Emmy nominations for her work as Connie on Netflix’s animated series “Big Mouth,” as The Judge on NBC’s “The Good Place” and for her performance as Kamala Harris on “Saturday Night Live.” https://bit.ly/3bhQAKG

Maya Rudolph’s first auditions were usually for parts in commercials or music videos. It was the mid-90s when she snagged work as an extra in a Dr. Dre video. “It was a night shoot and we got…

Chadwick Boseman was always more than just the Black Panther. Was it his biggest role? Surely. But he handled the task o...
08/31/2020
Perspective | Chadwick Boseman embodied the Black heroes of our past and gave us one for the future

Chadwick Boseman was always more than just the Black Panther. Was it his biggest role? Surely. But he handled the task of taking on Black icons so well — from James Brown to Thurgood Marshall — that his casting as the Black superhero that matters most was more certainty than surprise when Marvel Studios President Kevin Feige announced he landed the role in 2014.

To be Black and to love superheroes is a gift and a curse.

The gift is your Blackness, which so many of us learn will be a defining trait in the preconceived notions of any non-Black gaze that lays eyes on us. It can be Kryptonite to some, or forged into a weapon for good for others. The curse is finding that Blackness in any sort of abundance when you are reading a comic book or watching a superhero movie.

The Black Panther, no matter the medium, always has been and always will be the exception to that rule.

Chadwick Boseman was the embodiment of that exception, giving us the biggest gift any person of color who loves comic-book culture ever received: his portrayal of T’Challa, king of Wakanda, in “Black Panther.” He seemingly obliterated the curse of so many never seeing themselves as a hero — the hero — in the process. https://wapo.st/2QBTK2a

"Black Panther" actor Chadwick Boseman, who died Friday, spent the majority of his career playing Black icons such as Jackie Robinson and Thurgood Marshall.

When Esquire EIC Michael Sebastian was asked about the significance of the September issue last month, he told CNN Repor...
08/27/2020
Was It Our Hair? Or Was It You?

When Esquire EIC Michael Sebastian was asked about the significance of the September issue last month, he told CNN Reporter, Kerry Flynn, it wasn’t just about the fashion trends but rather it's about having stories that 'meet this moment.' It is clear by the recent releases of covers — including Esquire’s — that editors are exemplifying that approach in 2020. Esquire’s cover star is Black artist The Weeknd, and inside the issue you’ll find important Black stories including one about a friendship among seven Black mayors.

Glamour’s September issue — which is digital-only now — explores Black hair and the discrimination Black women face for it. Not only did Glamour choose to focus on an important Black narrative but they tapped an incredible Black journalist as guest editor: Ashley Alese Edwards. You may remember she publicly spoke out about toxicity at Refinery29 — an action that inspired more women to speak on the record. Read her editor's letter and the issue’s stories here.

WSJ Magazine’s September cover — also released on Tuesday — features tennis player Naomi Osaka. https://bit.ly/2Yz89Re

These six women have worked in industries as varied as retail, restaurants, and the military, but their message is the same: We are not our hair, and our hair is our own.

This year, the closely-watched, much-anticipated September issue of Vogue is breaking precedent. Firstly, all 26 edition...
08/26/2020
Aurora James Is One of Two 'Vogue' September Issue Covers

This year, the closely-watched, much-anticipated September issue of Vogue is breaking precedent. Firstly, all 26 editions of the Condé Nast glossy are united by a singular focus: exploring the theme of hope. Then, instead of putting a photograph of a high-profile celebrity on the cover, Vogue U.S. revealed on Tuesday that it would feature two portraits by contemporary artists — one of Aurora James, the founder of Brother Vellies and the 15 Percent Pledge, by Jordan Casteel, and another of a fictional subject, wearing a dress by Off-White, by Kerry James Marshall.

It's not totally unfathomable for a painting to front the magazine, but it is rare: Vogue has done it only a handful of times in its history, including in September 2017, starring Jennifer Lawrence by John Currin. What's even more rare is for a designer to appear on the cover. In fact, it's only ever happened once — in January 2020, when Stella McCartney appeared alongside Greta Gerwig, Ashley Graham and Cardi B, as part of a four-part series on motherhood.

"I believe that what Aurora is doing is hugely important in creating the long-term change that Black people deserve and this country owes us," Casteel told Dodie Kazanjian in the accompanying cover story. "I see her as a light in a lot of darkness, and a potential for hope, a representative of change across all creative industries."

"What’s most exciting to me is being given artistic integrity and being able to choose the person to be my sitter — someone who reflects a portion of my own identity — and then to do that truly in the medium of my choice," Casteel continued. "This is the way that I speak to the world. And this is the way I’ve been speaking to the world and talking about the humanity of our people, talking about humanity in general. It’s a really profound experience. I do think I’m participating and a change is happening." https://bit.ly/34ATFUC

The designer and 15 Percent Pledge founder was illustrated by painter Jordan Casteel for one cover; Kerry James Marshall created a fictional figure, wearing Off-White, for the other.

Moments before he began filming his reaction to Phil Collins’ “In the Air Tonight,” Tim Williams had the same thought th...
08/25/2020
How YouTube Reaction Videos Are Changing the Way We Listen

Moments before he began filming his reaction to Phil Collins’ “In the Air Tonight,” Tim Williams had the same thought that he has before he records every video for Twins the New Trend, the YouTube channel he runs with his brother, Fred.

“I always think, when we do a video, that it could be that person’s favorite song that we’re reacting to,” Tim Williams, 22, says. “You know, if you have a favorite song and you’re seeing somebody reacting to it, you’re going to watch it.” Tim and Fred rarely think twice about any of their videos after they’re filmed, and “In the Air Tonight” was no different. “We do so many videos, we forget about them,” says Tim. “We just run through the videos not thinking they’re going to blow up.”

But by the morning after they posted their Phil Collins reaction in late July, the Williams twins could already tell that it was different than the nearly 1,000 other videos they’ve uploaded to their channel during the past few years. In the weeks after it was posted, the twins’ response to the 1981 Top 20 hit went mega-viral, sparking a 1,100 percent spike in sales of Collins’ original, garnering reactions from congressional candidates and A-list Hollywood directors, inspiring think pieces and interview opportunities, and earning more than 6 million views (more than several of Taylor Swift’s new songs released the same week).

After a viral reaction to a Phil Collins hit, channel creators reflect on how their work is re-framing classic songs — and breaking down cultural barriers in the process

Last year, Aaron Gordon, a senior writer for Vice’s Motherboard, received a handwritten tip in the mail about Post Offic...
08/19/2020

Last year, Aaron Gordon, a senior writer for Vice’s Motherboard, received a handwritten tip in the mail about Post Office delivery trucks catching on fire.

The tip led Gordon to file a records request, which, six months later, resulted in thousands of pages of fire investigation reports. This past July, his story, “Post Office delivery trucks keep catching on fire,” led readers to send him even more tips (his author tag is now mostly dominated by photos of USPS trucks).

Gordon’s entrance into the Post Office beat is now proving unexpectedly useful as the plight of the U.S. Postal Service has become a national news story in recent weeks. Due to the ongoing coronavirus pandemic, the safest choice for many U.S. citizens will be to vote by mail rather than in person.

08/19/2020

Two writers, a graphic designer, and a stage manager walk into a room. Prashanth Venkataramanujam, executive producer and co-creator of Patriot Act with Hasan Minhaj, says that’s exactly how the show was born. They began self-producing the show when he and Hasan would sit in a conference room in Minhaj’s apartment building writing the script with a graphic designer and a stage manager.

They began self-producing the show when he and Hasan would sit in a conference room writing the script with the help of a graphic designer and a stage manager. They would rehearse the show, rewrites would inevitably happen and then they got a production company involved to handle the taping. That led to them booking studio space and then inviting an audience to watch the show. They initiated all of this on their own, without the help of a media company.

Six seasons later, the rest is Netflix history. We applaud the team behind Patriot Act for an amazing run and we can't wait to see what's next!

The deadline to apply to Farrar, Straus and Giroux's fall 2020 remote internship program is TODAY! ⁠FSG interns work in ...
08/17/2020

The deadline to apply to Farrar, Straus and Giroux's fall 2020 remote internship program is TODAY! ⁠

FSG interns work in a variety of departments—including editorial, publicity, sales, contracts, and subsidiary rights—between 18–25 hours per week for 10–12 weeks. Interns are paid $15/hour. ⁠The program will be starting in late September.⁠

Applications for the fall internship session must be submitted on or before August 17. Successful applicants will be notified by September 4. Email a résumé & cover letter to [email protected].

Learn more and apply now: https://bit.ly/fsg-remote

‘An Oral History Of The Office’ Provides An Inside Look Into The Sitcom.The Spotify-exclusive podcast has brought new li...
08/13/2020

‘An Oral History Of The Office’ Provides An Inside Look Into The Sitcom.
The Spotify-exclusive podcast has brought new life to the classic — this time pulling back the curtains on the acting, directing, writing and producing that have an eternal home in the hearts of millions across the globe.

The podcast rekindles listeners’ love for “The Office” by critically investigating every decision that snowballed into the show’s monumental success. But instead of drowning out the show’s feel-good humor and sentimental familiarity with dry analysis from unknown writers and producers, “An Oral History of The Office” thrives on what made the show so lovable — the characters. https://bit.ly/3iEsmfS

In 2016, when Solange released her critically acclaimed “A Seat at the Table,” she anchored the album with snippets of c...
08/13/2020

In 2016, when Solange released her critically acclaimed “A Seat at the Table,” she anchored the album with snippets of conversations she’d had with famed ‘90s rap mogul Master P. In one, titled “For Us By Us,” the No Limit Records founder spoke of turning down one particular big-money deal: “What do you think I’m worth if this white man offers me a million dollars?” In “No Limit Chronicles, the five-part BET docuseries on his New Orleans-based hip-hop label that concludes on Wednesday, Master P expounds on this, claiming that the white man was former Interscope Records CEO Jimmy Iovine and that the deal wouldn’t have allowed him to retain ownership of his music or name.

Earlier this year, as companies across various industries pledged to make workplaces more equitable for Black employees, the music industry held Blackout Tuesday to reflect on the harm the record industry has done to Black creatives, and to consider a plan of action for moving forward. But in a feature published last week, Rolling Stone noted that proof of change is “hard to find.” “None of the labels have said publicly that they will rethink the types of record deals they offer young black men and women,” wrote Elias Leight. “None of the labels have come forward to say they will write off the unrecouped balances of older black artists that are no longer signed to them.” More than two decades after Master P (born Percy Miller) allegedly told Iovine during a meeting that he was going to go grab lunch and never returned, artists are still fighting for ownership of their work.

Ahead of the 100th anniversary of the 19th Amendment, Teen Vogue wants its readers to think of the people who are still ...
08/12/2020

Ahead of the 100th anniversary of the 19th Amendment, Teen Vogue wants its readers to think of the people who are still disenfranchised. Its new series, “The Uncounted,” includes first-person accounts from 10 voting rights activists.

August 18 marks the 100th anniversary of the ratification of the 19th Amendment — the largest expansion of the franchise in the country’s history. It is a celebrated milestone in the United States’s story of suffrage and equal rights for women. But in practice, that historic document largely granted voting rights only to those who were white and well-off. Sexism, immigration bans, and a patchwork of other discriminatory state laws barred Native, Black, Asian, and Latinx women from voting well into the 20th century.

And yet. Despite these daunting circumstances, would-be voters have spent decades banging on those glass doors. Teen Vogue spoke to some inspiring women who are currently advocating for other people to have the right to vote, even though they wouldn’t have been granted that right 100 years ago.

Media Source: https://bit.ly/3kEJ8x8

As the internet lit up last month with prominent Latinos vowing to boycott Goya pinto beans, Adobo seasoning and other p...
08/10/2020

As the internet lit up last month with prominent Latinos vowing to boycott Goya pinto beans, Adobo seasoning and other products after the company’s CEO lavishly praised President Trump, a backlash quickly developed on social media.
Accounts identified as belonging to Latino social media users voiced outrage about politically correct “mob” bullying and exploiting people of color.

In an online virtual war room run by a group called Win Black/Pa’lante, activists immediately grew suspicious.

Close inspection revealed that thousands of the posts were not coming from disaffected Latinos at all, but bots. https://bit.ly/2PG8XPb

08/06/2020
Office Hours: Farrar, Straus And Giroux

Recent graduates Deborah Ghim, Editorial Assistant and Alexis Nowicki, Associate Publicist at book publishing company Farrar, Straus and Giroux answer questions from students about how to break into publishing, the importance of networking, and learning how to work your way up the ranks.

08/06/2020

Don’t underestimate the power of your current professional relationships, even if you are not at your dream position or organization yet. At our Diversity + Media Career Summit, Torrance Boone, VP Global Client & Agency Solutions at Google, believes your personal networks and relationships, such as the ones you forge in college, grad school or early in your career are the most powerful ones. “They actually become more important the more senior you get in your career...and they're often just a phone call or an email away,” says Boone.

How many people are in your direct network that you went to school with or met at industry groups and events? Don't discount your peer connections, many times they are the most valuable contacts.

Issa Rae Producing HBO Doc on Black TV Pioneers: 'Seen & Heard' will explore the history of representation on TV via arc...
08/06/2020
Issa Rae Producing HBO Doc on Black TV Pioneers

Issa Rae Producing HBO Doc on Black TV Pioneers: 'Seen & Heard' will explore the history of representation on TV via archival footage and interviews with actors, writers and showrunners.

"Black people have such a rich, but often unacknowledged history in Hollywood," said Rae, the creator and star of HBO's Insecure. "We have defined American culture and influenced generations time and time again across the globe. I'm honored to pair with Ark Media to center and celebrate the achievements of those who paved a way for so many of us to tell our stories on television."

Seen & Heard will feature interviews with actors, showrunners, writers and celebrities that offer commentary about representation in Black storytelling, along with verité-driven segments and archival material. Interviewees will reflect on their experiences watching African Americans on TV in the past and today and share insights into their current creative work and inspiration. The goal is to open a window into the larger evolution of Black storytellers throughout the history of the medium. https://bit.ly/39YSMG6

'Seen & Heard' will explore the history of representation on TV via archival footage and interviews with actors, writers and showrunners.

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The Center for Communication is a nonprofit dedicated to increasing diversity, promoting inclusivity, and expanding access to opportunity in the media industry. Through our series of free educational programs, we put thousands of students each year in the room with leading creators, innovators, and executives in journalism, media, marketing, entertainment and related fields. We enable our community to gain essential career guidance and hands-on experience they won’t find in any classroom. Ours is a “center without walls”—a vital forum for the best minds in the business to inspire and connect with the next generation of media leaders.

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A not-for-profit organization dedicated to the support and promotion of gender and ethnic diversity in film and television. They are committed to challenging its membership to continually strive to be better through education, outreach and networking. THEY ARE ALSO VERY BIG ABOUT FIGHTING RACISM AND BIGOTRY targeting Asian Americans and others targeted because of the pandemic menace.
Bernie Sanders is the only Hope for America. He is the only one who represent us the 99%, and is not bought and own by the rich 1% like Joe Biden. Trump became President not because of his Cheetos hair, but because America (both Republicans and Democrats) were tired of the Rich Establishment running our government. The Republican voters did not vote for any of the twenty politicians who were running. They knew they were all bought and own by the rich lobbyists. They made a revolutionary move and went for change in hope of the people getting their government back. The Democrats, unfortunately not enough, were ready for change too. They saw that the Wall Street Owned Hillary was bonded by the previous administration. That had no problem in coming up with trillions of our taxpayer dollars to bail out the Rich on Wall Street, why ignoring us on Main street. Many Black people like myself hoped that Obama would do something for the Black people. The average White person’s wealth in America is ten times (not twice or three times), ten times that of the average Black person. Let me remind you this is not the 1800’s this is 2020. Obama was President for eight years, eight years, and wealth for Black people did not change one bit. As he signed a bill giving trillions of dollars to bail out the rich on Wall Street. Nowhere, on that bill did he or Biden included anything about giving something to the poor Blacks in urban areas like Baltimore and Chicago. While many of those on Wall Street became Billionaires, the minimum wage did not go up one cent. The Rich don’t want to pay no more to us workers than they have to, and as long as we elect people who are bought and own by them, they won’t! Instead of Medicare for all, they chose Affordable Healthcare, that was only affordable to the well-off middle class. As they sit silently as the Rich raised up prescriptions ten times what other countries were selling them for. Women who wanted equal pay, saw a Ledbetter bill that was a joke for the Rich employer that had no enforcement in it as women today are still not paid equally for the same work. Then you tell me that you were surprised that Trump won? Will you be surprised this time too if we send a Democrat who is bought and own, who only represents the wellbeing of the Rich establishment. America our only HOPE is BERNIE SANDERS. He is the only one that represent us the people, the 99% and not the rich Billionaires who make us do all the work while they greedily hog up all the profit. We, the working class finally have someone who will stand up for us and all we have to do is Vote . Vote Bernie Sanders 2020 - Gregory St James Mundy-
Hi. Do you mind sharing your speakers for this event?
I am confirming my registration for the Decembef 4 event with Sheila Nevins. Kudos on your superb programming. Thanks! Michael Skakun
In the old days when CfC was located in Manhattan – that's my time frame – I used some of the online CfC videos in my classroom. Much, much better they were than inviting a guest speaker. So, I'm wondering if CfC, in light #meetoo and other the #antiworkplacebullyinglegislation being proposed, if there are any upcoming panels about how students should prepare or survive or anticipate hostile workplaces after they graduate.
Ever heard of this script: STREAMS BEYOND GLOOM ? The manuscript is ready .,on for sale +2347087371638
Will the Storytelling through VR be streamed tonight via Facebook Live like the Where the Jobs Are: TV panel discussion?
Hi! Any chance you might live stream the Dynamic Storytelling Through VR presentation?
would love you to showcase my work im a writer, playwright and a book true blondes on amazon.com I'm senior citizen do i fit in,,,carol hollenbeck
Hello! I thought I'd share this video with you all since you share a common interest in media and communications! I'd love to hear your thoughts and comments. Lets chat! Here is the link to the full video: