Mid-South Hunting and Fishing News

Mid-South Hunting and Fishing News "Dedicated to the Outdoors That's Right Outside Your Backdoor"
(46)

My friend, Jerry Rhodes, with the biggest of 25 we caught Friday, April 17, most on plasticc craws
04/19/2020

My friend, Jerry Rhodes, with the biggest of 25 we caught Friday, April 17, most on plasticc craws

John Michael Mann had a great day yesterday, despite sunny skies and a cool east wind. This is the biggest of around 25.
04/19/2020

John Michael Mann had a great day yesterday, despite sunny skies and a cool east wind. This is the biggest of around 25.

Funny story. .. .I posted a picture of my youngest grandson with his first bass caught on a Creme rigged worm. Our Bass ...
04/19/2020

Funny story. .. .I posted a picture of my youngest grandson with his first bass caught on a Creme rigged worm. Our Bass Club hosted an "Old Timers Day" on Oneal Lake, a few years back. One of our "Pros" had an older guest that was casting one of those old-timey Creme rigs on a push button reel. The "Old Timer" had five bass in the boat before the "Pro" even had a bite. They still work over grass beds and farm ponds !

My youngest grandson, Sean Morey, 11, with his first bass caught all on his own. Notice his lure. Old School, Creme rigg...
04/18/2020

My youngest grandson, Sean Morey, 11, with his first bass caught all on his own. Notice his lure. Old School, Creme rigged worm. Been getting 'em since 1955.

TN Fishing Map Guides on Sale. Great Gift!
04/16/2020
TN Fishing Map Guides on Sale. Great Gift!

TN Fishing Map Guides on Sale. Great Gift!

Sturdy, spiral-bound books contain detailed contour lake maps, stocking and sampling data, and excellent fishing tips, locations and strategies written by local outdoors writers for each reservoir and numerous streams.

04/07/2020

The COVID 19 has created an unfortunate situation that has forced us to skip our May Edition. We are considering printing in July Instead. We will be mailing April copies to our Advertisers rather than personal deliveries. Hopefully, we can get back on schedule in June. Meanwhile, GET OUTSIDE and send us pictures to put on FB.

TWRA: Spring turkey season will open as scheduled
04/03/2020
TWRA: Spring turkey season will open as scheduled

TWRA: Spring turkey season will open as scheduled

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (WATE) — Not to worry turkey hunters, the coronavirus pandemic isn’t interrupting the spring turkey season opener this weekend. The Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency …

04/03/2020

Just read Garry Mason's forwarded post by the head of TWRA. After advice from Gov. Lee of TN, Both order nos. 22 and 23 concerning the COVID 19, consider hunting and fishing to be ESSENTIAL activities. TWRA invites all to enjoy our great Tennessee Outdoors. Turkey season will still be open and Spring Fishing is always great. Be safe and observe "Social Distancing" Get Outside !

The Fishing Brummetts, Jack and Joan, picked a good day to fish a shallow lake.
03/30/2020

The Fishing Brummetts, Jack and Joan, picked a good day to fish a shallow lake.

Staying home means missing out!
03/21/2020

Staying home means missing out!

Check out these great crappie caught today! Come keep your social distance in the great outdoors at Historic Reelfoot Lake. We are now offering over the phone check in & room service!

Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency
03/20/2020

Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency

Tennesseans, the great outdoors remains open as usual and more inviting than ever. Practice ‘social distancing,’ get outside and enjoy Tennessee’s natural resources.
Boat ramps are open and now is a good time to go fishing.
Find one near you: https://bit.ly/397poeB
#tnwildlife

Jeff Gaither boated this 18 pound catfish last week.
03/08/2020

Jeff Gaither boated this 18 pound catfish last week.

Larry Doring is proud if his 6-8 Largemouth caught while fishing with Vaughn Bolles.
03/08/2020

Larry Doring is proud if his 6-8 Largemouth caught while fishing with Vaughn Bolles.

Vaughn Bolles with a fine argemouth he caught last week
03/08/2020

Vaughn Bolles with a fine argemouth he caught last week

Jack Brummett and I had a very pleasant morning chunking soft plastic craws at the local bass. Caught 20 in three hours....
03/07/2020

Jack Brummett and I had a very pleasant morning chunking soft plastic craws at the local bass. Caught 20 in three hours. This is Jack with the biggest of the lot. Second week in a row he has landed the best one. Good job old friend !

Scotts Hill Student Anglers
03/02/2020

Scotts Hill Student Anglers

Congratulations to Chase Stubblefield and Carson Cooper on their 7th place finish in the Junior division today. A big congratulations to Bracyn Sullivan and Tyler Crews on their 6th place finish out of 250 plus Bassmaster high school teams today on Lewis Smith Lake fishing the Southern Open. They punched their ticket to the prestigious Bassmaster High School National Championship. Good job to all our teams for having fish on a tough lake.

Tom Russell, Lee English, Elliot Simmons, and David Mann of Haywood County, TN. put a real hurt on some El Salto, Mexico...
03/01/2020

Tom Russell, Lee English, Elliot Simmons, and David Mann of Haywood County, TN. put a real hurt on some El Salto, Mexico bass recently.

Mark Hopper with a 9-6 giant caught his week and Lou Williams with some Pickwick lunkers, also this week.
02/27/2020

Mark Hopper with a 9-6 giant caught his week and Lou Williams with some Pickwick lunkers, also this week.

02/25/2020
Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency

Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency

The TWRA and many others are working hard in the search for three boaters missing near Pickwick Dam. Here is an update on the search and rescue efforts with TWRA Regional Outreach & Communications Coordinator, Amy Spencer. #tnwildlife

Dynamic Sponsorships
02/24/2020

Dynamic Sponsorships

Wisdom from a 4-time Bassmaster Classic Champion

"Only two men in 50 years of professional bass fishing history can claim four Bassmaster Classic titles. Kevin VanDam, and a man I am absolutely humbled to share a close friendship with, Rick Clunn Professional Angler.

The chances of living in the same town as a Bassmaster Classic Champion are pretty rare – let alone a 4-time Classic Champion – in a little Ozark Mountain town called Ava, MO. But sure enough, that’s where I was born and raised, and that’s where Rick settled with his family several years ago.

The first time I met Rick, was actually in an adrenalin filled incident in the dark before tournament blast off, before a little weekend jackpot tournament on Bull Shoals.

Rick had backed his boat down the ramp, with his son River in it, who was probably in middle school at the time, and as Rick went to park the truck, River hit the trolling motor switch and it kinda bucked him in the lake. Instinctively, I rushed to pull his young son from the water – and well – that’s more or less how Rick and I’s friendship began.

Since then, Rick has shared more great advice than I’ll ever be able to repay him for, including last week during a short visit to his house and trophy room, when we talked about the upcoming Classic on Lake Guntersville .

Ironically, it was Lake Guntersville where Rick won the first of his four Classics in the fall of 1976. Obviously, his knowledge of the lake 44 years ago has very little to do with what I’ll face there in a few days, but his words once again will have a profound effect on my mental approach to my first Classic.

We talked about how I recently had the amazing good fortune of winning both the Toyota Series tournament and the Carhartt College Bass Series event on Toledo Bend last month, and how some folks will say I’m on a streak.

Rick said, “Don’t go to the Classic in Guntersville thinking you’re on a streak. Streaks end. Instead you need to go there to win.”

Pretty profound words.

So that’s what I’ll do my very best to achieve. Not get lost in the fact that I’m participating in the world’s most prestigious bass tournament, but instead to put nerves and stress aside, and focus on winning.

If anything, I’m actually motivated by the ‘need to win.’ I’m 22 years old. Engaged to be married. About to graduate college. And my family is not rich. My dad is a Carhartt wearing state highway department worker, and my mom stocks shelves at a large retail store. Life decisions are being made quickly, and the desire to launch a full time pro career requires money – a lot of it.

Winning the Classic would solve a whole bunch of the financial concerns I currently face, and also completely solidify my dream of fishing for a living.

I feel like my mind is right, and my focus is solid. I’m not going to pack my Carhartt hoodie, and head toward Birmingham hoping for a participation trophy at Lake Guntersville.

Thanks to Rick, I’ll aim to win my first Classic trophy there, just like he did 44 years ago." - Cody Huff #OutWorkTheWater #OutFishThemAll

02/24/2020

Please keep the families of those lost at Pickwick in your prayers. Last Saturday, two young anglers and their boat Captain had motor trouble and were last seen in the area near the Pickwick Dam. Today, their severely damaged boat was discovered at the Savannah Bridge several miles below the Dam. According to TWRA, Its is believed that the strong current pulled the boat and its occupants through the floodgates and into the maelstrom below. TWRA and Law Enforcement are suspending their search at sundown and will resume at first light tomorrow.

New post added at Twra Launches New Weekly Television ProgramNASHVILLE --- Building on its award-winning television show...
02/11/2020

New post added at Twra Launches New Weekly Television Program
NASHVILLE --- Building on its award-winning television show history, the Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency announces the launch of a new series, Tennessee Outdoor Journal.
The weekly program will feature a behind-the-scenes look at the work being done to manage the wildlife, public lands, and waterways in the state. Each episode will
https://mshfn.com/twra-launches-new-weekly-television-program/

New post added at Mid-South Hunting & Fishing News - Permit Application Available for Light Goose Conservation Season
02/10/2020

New post added at Mid-South Hunting & Fishing News - Permit Application Available for Light Goose Conservation Season

Bethel wins again! 🤩
01/27/2020

Bethel wins again!
🤩

Mark Hopper is still reeling in the hawgs- This one was boated, weighed, and released on Jan. 6. A 10-5.
01/09/2020

Mark Hopper is still reeling in the hawgs- This one was boated, weighed, and released on Jan. 6. A 10-5.

01/06/2020

An incinerator to address deer carcass disposal in Unit CWD will be constructed in Fayette County. The Tennessee Fish and Wildlife Commission (TFWC) approved a $1 million budget expansion for the project at its December meeting. The incinerator will be constructed at the Fayette County Landfill and will be maintained and operated by Fayette County.
"CWD poses many challenges including safe disposal of deer carcasses. As a response to concerns from citizens regarding the burial of carcasses, the TWFC has fully funded the purchase of a large incinerator that will be operational by next hunting season" said Dr. Hank Wright, commissioner of TFWC District 9. "We are working to put the best science available to use while serving not only the hunting public, but all citizens living in southwest Tennessee."
The large-scale incinerator will be available to processors and hunters to dispose of deer from the CWD-positive and high-risk counties of southwest Tennessee. The incinerator will get above 1,800 degrees Fahrenheit, the temperature necessary to kill the disease.
"When it comes to inactivating and denaturing prions and making them unavailable to infect additional animals, wildlife managers have very limited options," said Dr. Dan Grove, UT Extension Assistant Professor and Wildlife Veterinarian. "Having a large scale incinerator available in Unit CWD will help provide a needed outlet for many of the potentially infectious waste materials generated from deer and CWD management activities in southwest Tennessee."
Since detecting CWD first in December of 2018, the Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency has established the goal of keeping CWD from spreading, keeping the number of diseased deer in the affected area to a minimum, and reducing disease rates where possible. The TWRA has already sampled more than 10,000 deer for CWD this deer season and the reported number of positives this season is 148 thus far.
---TWRA---

01/05/2020

Anyone desiring to have pictures in MSHFN, simply email them with basic info of who, when, and approxiamate location to: [email protected]

John Michael Mann took down this huge bobcat on New Years day, a 40 pound giant.He saw two and the other one was even bi...
01/02/2020

John Michael Mann took down this huge bobcat on New Years day, a 40 pound giant.He saw two and the other one was even bigger !

Guess who's doing what on the Wolf right now!!!!
12/27/2019

Guess who's doing what on the Wolf right now!!!!

A pretty good one caught on a plastic craw less than 100 yards from I-40.
12/26/2019

A pretty good one caught on a plastic craw less than 100 yards from I-40.

12/20/2019

DON'T SHOOT THE MESSENGER

CWD Testing Results Delayed

Test results are now taking up to 6 weeks or longer to get back from the lab that TWRA contracts with for doing testing. We apologize for this delay in results as much of the season it was taking around 2 weeks. The increase in turnaround time is due to several factors out of our control. We have exceeded 10,000 samples this season so far and currently about half of those are still pending. The lab is working diligently on getting caught up with the extremely high volume of testing they are doing.

In the meantime, we are looking for an additional lab to help us with CWD testing for the remainder of the season. We know how frustrating this can be, and we promise to work through this as quickly as possible. Thank you for your patience.

How to find your CWD Test Results:

visit CWDinTN.com
Scroll down to test results and enter your confirmation number in the search box
Your result should come up and show detected, not detected, or pending
CWD Test Results

What is TWRA Doing about CWD?
Our goal is to keep CWD from spreading, keeping the number of diseased deer in the affected area to a minimum, and reducing disease rates where possible. To achieve that goal, the Tennessee Fish and Wildlife Commission established a CWD deer unit with specific regulations that are science-based and data-driven. Read more about TWRA's response.

CWDinTN.com

MORE INFORMATION:

CWDinTennesee.com

TWRA Contact Information

12/16/2019

Updates on chronic wasting disease (CWD) and deer harvest numbers were among the items discussed at the December meeting of the Tennessee Fish and Wildlife Commission. The two day meeting concluded Friday at the Edgewater Hotel and Convention Center.
Chuck Yoest, the Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency's CWD coordinator, informed the commission the reported deer harvest has decreased in Unit CWD (11
He described the monumental CWD sampling efforts this deer season and reported there are five CWD-positive counties to date. CWD-positive counties include Fayette, Hardeman, Madison, Tipton, and Shelby.
Yoest described how the agency has already sampled more than 8,700 deer for CWD this deer season and reported the number of positives this season is 148 thus far. In conclusion, he updated the commission on plans to address the deer carcass disposal issue in the CWD affected area. The TFWC had approved a $1 million expansion for an incinerator to be constructed and operated by Fayette County officials.
The TFWC approved a budget expansion in the amount of $20,000 with funds from Hiwassee Chapter Trout Unlimited to support Southern Appalachian brook trout restoration efforts. These funds will be used to purchase needed equipment at Tellico Hatchery in Monroe County and to support seasonal staff.
Southern Appalachian brook trout are the only native trout in Tennessee and they are found at high elevations in the eastern mountains. Chapter representatives Steve Fry and Max Worthey were present at Friday's meeting for the presentation and thanked by the Agency and TFWC.
Multi-Media Chief Don King described a new agency television show that is being produced, Tennessee Outdoor Journal. The program is being produced in-house and will feature new segments as well as segments from agency podcasts and past television programs. Distribution will be geared toward public access stations across the state and social media outlets
A Threatened and Endangered Species list rule was presented by Environmental Services Chief Dave McKinney. The list is required by law to be reviewed and updated every two years.
The Threatened and Endangered Species list is presented to the TFWC every odd year and presented for approval to the TFWC for approval at its February meeting. This year's Tennessee endangered list includes 14 species of crayfish, nine species of fish, two amphibians, one bird (Bachman's sparrow). There are 30 additional species on the state threatened list and 92 species on the state's need of management list.
TWRA Region IV Boating and Law Enforcement program manager, Maj. Brian Ripley is retiring at the end of December. He was recognized at the meeting for his 37 years of service to the agency.
The TFWC first meeting of 2020 will be in Nashville. It is scheduled for Jan. 23-24 at the TWRA Region II Building.
---TWRA---

Looking for a great gift for your hunting/fishing friend?  Need a stocking stuffer?A Mid-South Hunting & Fishing News Ma...
12/10/2019

Looking for a great gift for your hunting/fishing friend? Need a stocking stuffer?

A Mid-South Hunting & Fishing News Magazine subscription would be perfect! $15 for an entire year!

visit www.mshfn.com

You know those people........  tag em!  :)
12/09/2019

You know those people........ tag em! :)

12/05/2019
12/05/2019

The Etiquette of Duck Hunting
Thursday, November 07, 2019 | 08:33am
duck-blog
By Tim White

Bob is sitting in his boat blind on the local wildlife management area on opening morning of duck season. He is excited about the prospects of shooting some birds. Mallards would be nice, but woodies, or whatever will do.

Bob has done his homework ... he has scouted over the past few weeks and knows where the ducks have been feeding and loafing. He has chosen his spot after careful consideration and hard work.

The air is cool and crisp and Bob is in his blind one hour be­fore legal shooting time. He has checked the wind and has his blind in the best spot. He has cleaned his gun, practiced his calling, worked his dog, bought a few new decoys to add to his spread, and is sport­ing a new hunting coat.

As the sky starts to turn orange, Bob sits in eager anticipation as he hears duck calls and wings whis­tling overhead.

Roy, on the other hand, is just showing up at the WMA. Roy is running late. He jumps out of his truck and slams the door shut. He runs around to the passenger side, grabs his gun, slams that door shut, launches his jon-boat, and starts out into the bottoms.

After a few minutes, he remem­bers he forgot his calls and ammo and heads back to the truck. A couple more door slams later and Roy is headed back to the swamp.

Roy has not hunted this area before and just didn't have time to get out and scout any. He decides to run until he flushes ducks and see what happens. He doesn't go far before he jumps a couple of wood ducks. Bang! He gets off a shot before the boat even comes off plane. The birds wing away into the sunrise.

He continues on and before long, he sees Bob sitting in his blind along a distant tree line. Does Roy avoid the area where he sees Bob hunting? No. Roy figures Bob is sitting there because it is

a good spot. So Roy motors to within 100 yards of Bob and pro­ceeds to set out decoys-after all, this is a public area and that other guy doesn't own it!

Before long, another pair of ducks wing across the marsh. Bob starts to call and they bank toward his spread of decoys. One more pass and they will be in range. Bang! Roy fires one off, never mind that the ducks were closer to Bob than Roy.

Now, even though Bob was well­prepared, had scouted the area and was there first, Roy thinks it is his right to hunt wherever he wants on this public area-and it is his right. However, poor Bob has to suffer the consequences of Roy's poor man­ners, poor hunting etiquette, and poor behavior. His hunt has been ruined and he has wasted a good portion of his time, money, and ef­fort, thanks to ol' Roy.

Here is another common scenar­io that plays out routinely in areas with more than one blind. Some hunters shoot when the ducks are too far away or when they are being worked by another blind. It usually goes something like this:

"Get down, we got 20 mallards bailing out of the sky.'

"Hit that duck call.'

"They are making one more swing and are headed in, get your guns ready.'

(Distant bang!)

"What the heck? I can't believe it. Those guys in that next blind shot at the ducks we were working!"

"Yeah, and the ducks were more than 100 yards away from them when they shot. They had no chance to kill 'em but just had to mess it up for us:

This is becoming more and more common each day on public and shared private hunting areas in Tennessee, and across the rest of the country. It is called poor hunting etiquette or just plain bad manners. It is an epidemic across the land and has the potential to drive many hunters out of the sport altogether.

It is not just duck hunting that we are talking about either. This lack of consideration for other sportsmen has become pervasive in all manner of outdoor activities where people are sharing a com­mon resource.

Many waterfowl hunters in Ten­nessee rely on public areas to have a place to hunt. These areas offer hunters an opportunity to hunt waterfowl that they would not otherwise have. However, because these areas are shared, hunters must show respect and consider­ation for each other.

Skybusting

Let's talk about skybusting, sky­blasting, or as I heard one hunter put it, "practicing the art of long­range shooting:' Whatever you call it, skybusting is a terrible habit to get into, not only on public lands but private lands, too.

Skybusting leads to many crip­pled ducks that never get retrieved, which is a travesty in and of itself. It also causes ducks to become shy of duck blinds, decoys, and duck calls. It can change feeding patterns, causing ducks to feed at night. 3½-inch shotguns and 10 gauges have caused hunters to think that they can kill ducks at 60 yards. Maybe you can, but why would you? Where is the satisfac­tion in shooting at a duck that was just passing by? That type of satisfaction may be attained by shooting skeet.

Skybusting behavior can be prevented if a hunter learns how to work ducks. Working ducks is an art and is a difficult skill to master. Practice duck calling more or hunt with someone who can call.

Most of the old-timers will tell you that the satisfaction in duck hunting isn't the killing. It's watch­ing a mallard respond to your call and bail out of the stratosphere to land in the decoys. Be patient enough to work a group of ducks for 15 swings before they decide to come in "feet down.”

There will be times when the ducks leave and you never get a shot. Again, it isn't all about the killing is it? It is called "duck hunting” not “duck shooting.”

Skybusting is a blight on most of the public waters of our great state. Help eradicate it by observing good duck hunting etiquette.

Minding your blind manners

Never shoot at swinging ducks that are being worked by another duck blind. This is an extremely poor and despicable action.

If you want to have a successful hunt, get to the site earlier, brush your blind better, put out more decoys, and learn to call better.

It is also ill-mannered to try to call ducks off another blind. Only call ducks that are swinging over close to your blind.

While on the subject of calling ducks, have you ever been invited to hunt with another person in his or her blind? Most of us have, and most of us know that you never pull out your duck calls and start calling in someone else's blind un­less you have been invited to call. You may think you sound great but ducks respond differently to dif­ferent calls in different areas under different kinds of conditions.

When I was in college, I invited a buddy to come home and duck hunt with me and my dad. The first morning in the blind, he started blowing his duck call every time a group of birds would come by.

After about an hour of this, my dad asked to see his duck call. He opened it up, took out the reed, put the reed in his pocket and handed the call back to my buddy. He never said another word and my buddy didn't call anymore.

I was allowed to call because Dad, Granddaddy, and my uncle taught me how to call. They not only taught me about the physical act of calling but they also taught me when to call, when not to call, and what calls to use. Many people can call ducks, but there is an art to working a duck.

Dog behavior

Don't pass your poor hunting manners on to your dog. Hunt­ing with a well-trained retriever is a blessing and a source of great enjoyment. Hunting with an ill­behaved, poorly-trained dog can be the cause of great indigestion and bouts of cursing.

If you are invited to hunt with someone else, always ask if it is okay to bring your dog. If you show up with yours and it is not needed, you may be leaving it in the truck.

Do your homework and train your dog. Your dog does not have to be field-trial ready to take hunt­ing. However, some basic com­mands to sit, stay, and be quiet are all that are usually necessary to keep your dog in line and keep the hunt enjoyable for others.

Be safe

Duck hunting is often a group activity and is inherently dangerous due to multiple guns shooting in multiple directions. Being safe in the blind is critical and being careless is not acceptable.

Always have your safety on, until the moment before you shoot. Guns can easily be knocked over in duck blinds by dogs, kids, and adults. Don't let a good time become a tragedy.

Always watch your muzzle and only shoot in your lane of fire.

Do not shoot next to someone's head. Many hunters have perma­nent hearing loss from having their "ears rung.”

Never shoot at a crippled duck when a person or dog is out of the blind trying to retrieve it. Even if you think you have a clean shot, let the dog or whoever is out of the blind finish the retrieve. Many a duck dog and duck hunter have been shot by mistake. Also, remember that when shooting at a cripple, it is considered bad man­ners to shoot someone's decoys.

Practice good hunting tech­nique. Ducks have much better eye­sight than humans. They are adept at seeing movement and color.

Many a waterfowl biologist has flown over a duck blind and will tell you that two things usually stand out: a poorly camouflaged duck blind and the face of a hunter.

A poorly camouflaged blind will reduce your hunting success. When you think you have your blind brushed good enough, add that much more brush to it.

From the air, a hunter's face looks like a white, pie plate. Wear­ing a facemask or face paint will help keep you invisible to ducks. If you prefer to just wear a hat, then make sure you use the bill to hide your face and don't look up. Dad had an old saying, "You can either look at ducks or shoot ducks, you can't do both.'

Finally, avoid movement. Hold still when ducks are working. Just stand still and listen to the callers as they do their thing. They will tell you where the ducks are com­ing from and when to get ready to shoot.

Some final points to consider:

• don't leave trash in the blind or at the site

• pick up your empty hulls

• do not shoot until the desig­nated caller calls the shot

• and-to repeat this one impor­tant safety consideration-do not click your safety off until you have raised your gun to shoot.

Always remember that duck hunting is a social sport-one to be enjoyed by a group of friends and family. Practicing good hunting etiquette is essential to a good hunt. Don't be unsafe, have a well­mannered dog, take good shots, respect other hunters, and respect the resource. These are the keys to being a good hunter and being someone that others enjoy being afield with.

As my dear Mama would say, "Have good manners.”

Tim White is a Wildlife Biologist with the TWRA. He received his B.S. and M.S. degrees from Tennes­see Tech University and has been an avid waterfowl hunter for more than 40 years.

Address

42 S Washington Ave
Brownsville, TN
38012

Opening Hours

Monday 08:00 - 17:00
Tuesday 08:00 - 17:00
Wednesday 08:00 - 17:00
Thursday 08:00 - 17:00
Friday 08:00 - 17:00

Telephone

(731) 772-9962

Alerts

Be the first to know and let us send you an email when Mid-South Hunting and Fishing News posts news and promotions. Your email address will not be used for any other purpose, and you can unsubscribe at any time.

Contact The Business

Send a message to Mid-South Hunting and Fishing News:

Nearby media companies


Other Brownsville media companies

Show All

Comments

8.35# from Gibson Co Lake 3/8/20
My Father in law caught this very unique catfish today at Glenn Springs in Drummonds TN. What do yall think?
Cooper Higdon age 12 , doing it again with a nice buck.
A few local TN hunts with my best hunting buddy , Cooper Higdon. 12 years old.
fishing is always a pleasure when u SON is learning about life !!!
Best of 38 this morning. Cooler east winds shut down the bite around 9:30.
Telling what's the hot spots ans what type of bait used
Has anyone tried or know if a microsd card will work in the older Cuddeback Capture game cameras? I know they have to be a certain size and the correct format but didn't know if the micro was different.
Jerry Rhodes with the morning's lunker. We caught 40 by noon at the Hatchie Refuge.
Hatchie bluegill
The gills are biting!
What lakes are accessible at the Hatchie Refuge near Brownsville with all the rain?