Clicky

Knight Science Journalism at MIT

Knight Science Journalism at MIT We offer experienced journalists the opportunity to increase their understanding of science, technology, medicine and the environment. Knight Science Journalism at MIT helps science and technology journalists build their competence, confidence, and connections through a nine-month fellowship program structured around course work, seminars, field trips, and workshops.

The nine-month Fellowships have now trained more than 330 journalists from every continent except Antarctica. Non-U.S. fellows have been appointed since 1984, and now typically comprise half of each class. Graduates of the program continue to move up, to win prizes (including the Pulitzer), and to extend their work to new levels (including 170 books by the latest count).

Operating as usual

We know what a flooded city looks like and we can imagine the devastation after a wildfire or a tornado rips through tow...
03/16/2022
What Does Extreme Heat Look Like?

We know what a flooded city looks like and we can imagine the devastation after a wildfire or a tornado rips through town. But what about extreme heat? What does that look like? KSJ fellow Sam Bloch explores in this guest post:

Extreme heat killed more Americans last year than wildfires and tornados combined. Journalist Sam Bloch reflects on the threat it poses to Watts, Los Angeles.

The Securities and Exchange Commission is expected to roll out a new rule that will require companies to disclose their ...
03/11/2022
Morning Energy

The Securities and Exchange Commission is expected to roll out a new rule that will require companies to disclose their risks from climate change. KSJ alum and POLITICO reporter Zack Colman has the details.

The Biden administration is quick to shoot back at the GOP criticisms.

A new research has shown that South American arachnids capture prey by performing a synchronized pop-and-lock-style “dan...
03/10/2022
These tiny spiders perform a synchronized pop-and-lock 'dance' as they hunt

A new research has shown that South American arachnids capture prey by performing a synchronized pop-and-lock-style “dance”. KSJ alum Jason Bittel covers the spiders' hunting habits in a piece for National Geographic.

In a new discovery, South American arachnids use coordinated funky dance moves to bring down prey 700 times their size.

For her Knight Science Journalism at MIT project fellowship, @emilylmullin has been researching the field of species-to-...
03/09/2022
When a Pig Is More Than a Pig

For her Knight Science Journalism at MIT project fellowship, @emilylmullin has been researching the field of species-to-species organ transplants, also known as xenotransplantation, for a book proposal.

In this guest post, she writes about how quickly the field is evolving:

We may be witnessing the dawn of the era of xenotransplantation, writes journalist Emily Mullin.

As a Knight Science Journalism at MIT Project Fellow, Ferris Jabr is working on a book that explores how life has change...
02/25/2022
KSJ Fellow Ferris Jabr is Reexamining Our Relationship with Earth

As a Knight Science Journalism at MIT Project Fellow, Ferris Jabr is working on a book that explores how life has changed the planet throughout its history and helped create the world as we know it.

The book project, like much of the work Jabr has done throughout his career, will draw on diverse fields of study, including biology, ecology, and geology — disciplines that Jabr describes as “so thoroughly connected that it makes more sense to think of them together.”

Read more:

The science writer’s latest project is uncovering some of the surprising ways that life has changed and shaped the planet.

02/16/2022
ksj.mit.edu

For her Knight Science Journalism at MIT fellowship; Virginia Gewin has been working to highlight land owners’ endeavors to prevent wind erosion, save water, and keep land productive as the arid southwest muddles through a megadrought. Read more:

Applications are now open for the Knight Science Journalism at MIT fact-checking workshop. Attendees will have an opport...
02/14/2022
[email protected] Fact-Checking Workshop - KSJ Fact Checking Project

Applications are now open for the Knight Science Journalism at MIT fact-checking workshop. Attendees will have an opportunity to enhance their understanding of editorial fact-checking and learn how to fact-check their work as a science writer or editor.

Apply by Feb 25:

Why Attend? This workshop will bring together science writers and editors to learn about editorial fact-checking. The application is not limited to those who already cover science. If you report on other topics but are interested in covering science, health, technology, or the environment: Please ap...

"I try to cultivate humility and am always bringing that to my engagement with people, so that I’m never missing the rea...
02/14/2022
To Write About Megafires, KSJ Alum Maura R. O'Connor Joined the Front Lines

"I try to cultivate humility and am always bringing that to my engagement with people, so that I’m never missing the real story because of my own pride." Knight Science Journalism at MIT alum Maura R. O'Connor shares reporting lessons and talks megafires in a recent Q&A:

In a Q&A, O'Connor reflects on training to become a wildland firefighter — and reporting on the deeply personal stories of people who do the job for a living.

"I try to cultivate humility and am always bringing that to my engagement with people, so that I’m never missing the rea...
02/07/2022
To Write About Megafires, KSJ Alum Maura R. O'Connor Joined the Front Lines

"I try to cultivate humility and am always bringing that to my engagement with people, so that I’m never missing the real story because of my own pride," says Knight Science Journalism at MIT alum Maura R. O’Connor in an interview:

In a Q&A, O'Connor reflects on training to become a wildland firefighter — and reporting on the deeply personal stories of people who do the job for a living.

KSJ is saddened to share the news that Pete Spotts, acclaimed science writer for The Christian Science Monitor in Boston...
02/04/2022
Alumni Notes: Award News, Book Launches, and Remembering a 'Bright Light' in Journalism

KSJ is saddened to share the news that Pete Spotts, acclaimed science writer for The Christian Science Monitor in Boston, died in November at age 70.

“Pete was such a bright light in science journalism,” said KSJ Director Deborah Blum. “He will be missed.”

More alumni news:

A recurring roundup of news about former KSJ Fellows, featuring Federico Kukso’s compendium of what the fellows have been writing.

02/02/2022
ksj.mit.edu

As a Knight Science Journalism Fellow, Melanie Kaplan has been working on a book about the use of animals in research, testing, and education. She documents her first long reporting for the book in this guest post:

What's the importance of using a feminist lens in brain science, and does gender plays a role in brain enhancement? KSJ ...
01/31/2022
What’s Different About Women’s Brains?

What's the importance of using a feminist lens in brain science, and does gender plays a role in brain enhancement? KSJ Project fellow Emily Willingham, author of The Tailored Brain, talks about this and more in an episode of the Slate.com podcast The Waves.

Puzzles aren’t the best way to boost your brain. Empathy is.

The deadline is fast approaching! The Victor K. McElheny Award recognizes outstanding coverage of science, public health...
01/27/2022
The Victor K. McElheny Award for Local and Regional Science Journalism

The deadline is fast approaching! The Victor K. McElheny Award recognizes outstanding coverage of science, public health, technology, or environmental issues at the local or regional level with a $5,000 prize. Enter by Jan 31:

The Victor K. McElheny Award honors outstanding local and regional journalism covering issues in science, public health, technology, or the environment.

JUST ONE WEEK LEFT to enter the 2022 McElheny Award for local and regional science journalism! Deadline Jan. 31. No Entr...
01/24/2022
McElheny Award: Submission Guidelines - [email protected]

JUST ONE WEEK LEFT to enter the 2022 McElheny Award for local and regional science journalism! Deadline Jan. 31. No Entry Fee. $5,000 Prize. More details here:

The Victor K. McElheny award honors outstanding coverage of science, public-health, technology, and environmental issues at the local or regional level.

In Oct. 2020, Cronutt, a sea lion, received a transplant of pig brain cells to treat his epilepsy. More than a year late...
01/17/2022
Pig brain cells may have cured a sea lion's epilepsy—are humans next?

In Oct. 2020, Cronutt, a sea lion, received a transplant of pig brain cells to treat his epilepsy. More than a year later, he is seizure-free. Could this therapy work for humans? KSJ fellow Emily Mullin has the story in a piece for the National Geographic.

The transplant in an animal named Cronutt points toward a new strategy to treat the disease. But many questions remain.

"Through his innovative ideas, leadership, and advocacy, Lovejoy leaves an enduring legacy to the field of conservation"...
01/12/2022
Tom Lovejoy’s enduring legacy to the planet

"Through his innovative ideas, leadership, and advocacy, Lovejoy leaves an enduring legacy to the field of conservation"--- KSJ fellow Jeremy Hance writes a tribute to the conservation biologist Tom Lovejoy, who passed away recently, for Mongabay.com

“All of a sudden, in one little lump, this project leaked into my mind,” Thomas Lovejoy recalled to writer David Quammen for the book The Song of the Dodo, about a night in December 1976 when he suddenly conceived what would become one of world’s most important ecological research projects: th...

"I wanted to write a book about Sumatran rhinos because I wanted a world where they still existed, and I thought, maybe,...
01/05/2022
Why Am I Writing About the Sumatran Rhino?

"I wanted to write a book about Sumatran rhinos because I wanted a world where they still existed, and I thought, maybe, there’s an off chance, tiny but possible, that a book might help the efforts to save them. The only reason the world still contains wolves, whales, gorillas, tigers, and any rhinos at all is because of people who cared and people who spent their short lives doing something about it," writes KSJ Project Fellow Jeremy Hance.

With so much in the world to worry about, should we care that a hairy, singing beast is on the verge of extinction? Yes, writes KSJ Project Fellow Jeremy Hance.

The Victor K. McElheny Award recognizes outstanding coverage of science, public health, technology, or environmental iss...
01/04/2022

The Victor K. McElheny Award recognizes outstanding coverage of science, public health, technology, or environmental issues at the local or regional level with a $5,000 prize. Enter by Jan 31: https://ksj.mit.edu/award/

In this interview, KSJ alum Eva Wolfangel talks about her role in the SilberSalz conference — part of an international s...
12/27/2021
KSJ Alum Eva Wolfangel Is Helping to Forge the Future of Science Storytelling

In this interview, KSJ alum Eva Wolfangel talks about her role in the SilberSalz conference — part of an international science and media festival in Germany aimed at fostering a culture of experimentation with science engagement — and how the festival inspired her to try creative forms of storytelling.

Read here:

As curator of the international SilberSalz conference, Wolfangel assembled some of documentary journalism's avant garde to chart new directions for science engagement.

To work at the Smithsonian’s facility in Panama is an opportunity many researchers dream of, but 16 female scientists sa...
12/17/2021
Women Scientists Described A Culture Of Sexual Misconduct At The Smithsonian’s Tropical Research Institute

To work at the Smithsonian’s facility in Panama is an opportunity many researchers dream of, but 16 female scientists said "their experiences there were nightmares ruled by prominent men who exploited their powers," a BuzzFeed News investigation reveals.

Many researchers dream of one day working at the Smithsonian’s facility in Panama. But 16 women scientists told BuzzFeed News that their experiences there were nightmares ruled by prominent men who exploited their powers.

"Socotra’s gregarious Egyptian vultures are a bright spot in an otherwise sobering global story" --- Former KSJ fellow S...
12/16/2021
Breakfast with a "Garbage Bin" - bioGraphic

"Socotra’s gregarious Egyptian vultures are a bright spot in an otherwise sobering global story" --- Former KSJ fellow Sarah Gilman reports on an endangered species of vultures for the bioGraphic.

Socotra’s gregarious Egyptian vultures are a bright spot in an otherwise sobering global story.

The Victor K. McElheny Award annually recognizes an outstanding work of local or regional journalism covering issues in ...
12/15/2021

The Victor K. McElheny Award annually recognizes an outstanding work of local or regional journalism covering issues in science, public health, technology, or the environment. One winning journalist or team of journalists will receive a $5,000 prize. Nominations are accepted through January 31, 2020: https://ksj.mit.edu/award/

Growing up around her grandparents in a historic Atlanta neighborhood with deep ties to the civil rights movement — KSJ ...
12/09/2021
For Filmmaker Asha Stuart, Journalism Is a Means for Social Justice

Growing up around her grandparents in a historic Atlanta neighborhood with deep ties to the civil rights movement — KSJ Project Fellow Asha Stuart found herself drawn to issues of race and equity at a young age. Today, Stuart’s work as a freelance documentary filmmaker and photographer is driven by the same passion.

Read more:

The Atlanta native is driven by a passion to shed light on the struggles of people living in marginalized communities.

A critical part of assuring local journalism excellence is to honor it. The Victor K. McElheny Award does just that — wi...
12/08/2021

A critical part of assuring local journalism excellence is to honor it. The Victor K. McElheny Award does just that — with a $5,000 prize. There is no fee to enter. Submit your nomination, now through Jan 31: https://ksj.mit.edu/award/

"The mental health hazards of covering war, terrorism, violence, and other disasters are well known. But science, enviro...
12/03/2021
When Science Reporting Takes an Emotional Toll - The Open Notebook

"The mental health hazards of covering war, terrorism, violence, and other disasters are well known. But science, environmental, and health journalists can also be at risk." Wudan Yan offers tips for managing mental health as a reporter in a story for The Open Notebook

The mental health hazards of covering war, terrorism, violence, and other disasters are well known. But covering topics such as chronic or rare illnesses, infectious disease outbreaks, and environmental crises can also evoke anxiety, fear, and guilt, or even trigger post-traumatic stress. “If you....

Science literacy has never been more important — and local and regional journalists have a central role in promoting it....
12/03/2021

Science literacy has never been more important — and local and regional journalists have a central role in promoting it. Submit your nomination for the $5,000 Victor K. McElheny Award now through Jan. 31, 2022: https://ksj.mit.edu/award/

Science literacy has never been more important — and local and regional journalists have a central role in promoting it....
12/01/2021

Science literacy has never been more important — and local and regional journalists have a central role in promoting it. A critical part of assuring journalism excellence is to honor it.

The Victor K. McElheny Award — for outstanding coverage of science, public-health, technology, or environmental issues at the local or regional level — does just that.

The award is now accepting nominations. Enter by Jan 31: https://ksj.mit.edu/award/

Mark your calendar: The submission window for the 2022 Victor K. McElheny Award opens Wed, Dec 1. More details on the $5...
11/29/2021
The Victor K. McElheny Award for Local and Regional Science Journalism

Mark your calendar: The submission window for the 2022 Victor K. McElheny Award opens Wed, Dec 1. More details on the $5,000 prize here:

The Victor K. McElheny Award honors outstanding local and regional journalism covering issues in science, public health, technology, or the environment.

'Moving science-focused content across language boundaries requires more than running articles through Google Translate....
11/18/2021
Translators’ Roundtable: Bringing Science to New Audiences - The Open Notebook

'Moving science-focused content across language boundaries requires more than running articles through Google Translate..." --- RamanSpoorthy at the The Open Notebook sheds light on how the work of translators is helping bring science to diverse audiences.

Translating science stories from English into other languages is essential for sharing newsworthy discoveries with much of the globe. But the practice is tougher than it sounds: It's much more than plugging words into Google Translate, and the challenges that translators meet along the way often go....

Address

77 Massachusetts Avenue
Cambridge, MA
02139

Telephone

(617) 452-3513

Alerts

Be the first to know and let us send you an email when Knight Science Journalism at MIT posts news and promotions. Your email address will not be used for any other purpose, and you can unsubscribe at any time.

Contact The Business

Send a message to Knight Science Journalism at MIT:

Videos

Nearby media companies


Other Media/News Companies in Cambridge

Show All

Comments

We know what a flooded city looks like and we can imagine the devastation after a wildfire or a tornado rips through town. But what about extreme heat? What does that look like? KSJ fellow Sam Bloch explores in this guest post:
The Securities and Exchange Commission is expected to roll out a new rule that will require companies to disclose their risks from climate change. KSJ alum and POLITICO reporter Zack Colman has the details.
A new research has shown that South American arachnids capture prey by performing a synchronized pop-and-lock-style “dance”. KSJ alum Jason Bittel covers the spiders' hunting habits in a piece for National Geographic.
For her Knight Science Journalism at MIT project fellowship, @emilylmullin has been researching the field of species-to-species organ transplants, also known as xenotransplantation, for a book proposal. In this guest post, she writes about how quickly the field is evolving:
LAST CALL! Today is the last day to apply for our fact-checking workshop. The workshop brings together science writers and editors to learn about editorial fact-checking. Apply now: https://ksjfactcheck.org/webinar/ksjmit-fact-checking-workshop-3/
As a Knight Science Journalism at MIT Project Fellow, Ferris Jabr is working on a book that explores how life has changed the planet throughout its history and helped create the world as we know it. The book project, like much of the work Jabr has done throughout his career, will draw on diverse fields of study, including biology, ecology, and geology — disciplines that Jabr describes as “so thoroughly connected that it makes more sense to think of them together.” Read more:
For her Knight Science Journalism at MIT fellowship; Virginia Gewin has been working to highlight land owners’ endeavors to prevent wind erosion, save water, and keep land productive as the arid southwest muddles through a megadrought. Read more:
Applications are now open for the Knight Science Journalism at MIT fact-checking workshop. Attendees will have an opportunity to enhance their understanding of editorial fact-checking and learn how to fact-check their work as a science writer or editor. Apply by Feb 25:
"I try to cultivate humility and am always bringing that to my engagement with people, so that I’m never missing the real story because of my own pride." Knight Science Journalism at MIT alum Maura R. O'Connor shares reporting lessons and talks megafires in a recent Q&A:
In a new controversial EU proposal, natural gas and nuclear power plants qualify as “contributing substantially to climate change mitigation,” KSJ alum Tim De Chant reports for Ars Technica
"I try to cultivate humility and am always bringing that to my engagement with people, so that I’m never missing the real story because of my own pride," says Knight Science Journalism at MIT alum Maura R. O’Connor in an interview:
KSJ is saddened to share the news that Pete Spotts, acclaimed science writer for The Christian Science Monitor in Boston, died in November at age 70. “Pete was such a bright light in science journalism,” said KSJ Director Deborah Blum. “He will be missed.” More alumni news: