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Tinto Press

Tinto Press Tinto Press www.TintoPress.com
A boutique publisher of creator-owned, independent comics graphic novels, and minicomics. Our goal is to publish quality stories and art with the utmost attention to quality of content and design.

Owned and operated by Ted Intorcio

My good friend, the great Denis Kitchen, was interviewed recently by Please Kill Me. I'm posting it here. If you've ever...
11/22/2021
DENIS KITCHEN CONFIDENTIAL: UNDERGROUND COMIX PIONEER KEEPS ON TRUCKIN’

My good friend, the great Denis Kitchen, was interviewed recently by Please Kill Me. I'm posting it here. If you've ever enjoyed a comicbook you should read the interview! I'm reading it right now! Enjoy! I know I will!
https://pleasekillme.com/denis-kitchen/

Denis Kitchen is, in my view, the Stan Lee of underground comix. While Lee’s Marvel Comics was cranking out Spider-Man, Fantastic Four, Doctor Strange, et al, Kitchen—at his Wisconsin-based Krupp Comics and Kitchen Sink imprints—was publishing a Who’s Who of renegades like Robert Crumb, Jay ...

05/12/2021
TCAF 2021

Happy Birthday MONTY PYTHONS

Karl and Tinto Press have officially cracked the museum gift shop market. Copies of Queen City can now be found at the M...
04/17/2021
Cartoonist’s “Queen City” celebrates a Denver that doesn’t always love him back

Karl and Tinto Press have officially cracked the museum gift shop market. Copies of Queen City can now be found at the Molly Brown House Museum! More news to follow!!

https://theknow.denverpost.com/2021/04/15/karl-christian-krumpholz-queen-city-comic/256479/?fbclid=IwAR1-uLnNMwHWgzk3ppbc3_hEX4Yjpz1hFdxbxX0DnBnbXXe7VhjaGYTNt2Y

Denver cartoonist Karl Christian Krumpholz documents his city's urban environment in "Queen City," a book capturing buildings new and old.

Queen City by @karlchristiankrumpholz now available at @mutinyinfocafe !
04/10/2021

Queen City by @karlchristiankrumpholz now available at @mutinyinfocafe !

Available Now!! from Karl Christian Krumpholz and Tinto Press
04/08/2021

Available Now!! from Karl Christian Krumpholz and Tinto Press

12/22/2020

@fcarballo79, Christian Dore and I are doing these. Enjoy!

doodles while rewatching Metropolis.
12/13/2020

doodles while rewatching Metropolis.

Heartfelt condolences to the family and friends of Ann Eisner, wife of Will Eisner.
11/22/2020

Heartfelt condolences to the family and friends of Ann Eisner, wife of Will Eisner.

The passing of Ann Eisner a few days ago in Florida, at 97, was heartbreaking for us. She and Will were wonderful lifetime partners, and Ann was a staunch supporter of Will’s career, even as she maintained a separate active life, working for many years as an unpaid “candy striper” volunteer in New York hospitals, organizing book clubs, and in more recent years writing and editing a newsletter.

After Will died in early 2005, Ann sold the home they had designed and built from scratch near Fort Lauderdale, and moved to a large retirement community in Parkland. When I would visit once a year or so I was always amused when she chauffeured me around. A short woman, Ann could seemingly barely see above the dashboard. But she had a “lead foot”—heavy on the gas—and a short temper for any slower drivers ahead of her. I used to joke that she may have moved to Florida but driving brought out the New Yorker in her. Eventually, when she approached ninety, she stopped driving, but Ann remained involved and active till the end.

I even received an email from her last week, two days before her passing. Other than macular degeneration in recent years, and in August a fractured pelvis from a fall, Ann remained plugged-in. She was pleased to cast an enthusiastic Biden vote as her final political act.

When I knew her eyesight was worsening I began to send her emails with greatly enlarged fonts so they would be easier for her to read. First I bumped my email texts to 18 point, then 24 point, then 28. But I always got replies in 12 point. Then, only a few months ago Ann told me her personal caretaker Serena had—for a long time!—been reading all incoming emails aloud to her and then Ann would dictate the replies. She said in her firm Ann voice, “You don’t have to use those gigantic letters, Denis. Serena's vision is 20-20!”

I realize that nearly all of the followers of this FB page didn’t know Ann or perhaps only met or saw her at a convention or two superficially, so I thought the best way to remember Ann and to provide some insight was to tell an anecdote or two. Following is one of my favorite remembrances, necessarily told in three parts...

Sometime in the early ‘70s I visited the Eisners' home in White Plains, NY for probably the first time. I had arranged with Will for Kitchen Sink Press to reprint some of his Spirit stories. Ann prepared dinner. As the three of us engaged in table conversation, I turned to Ann at one point and very innocently said, “What’s your favorite Spirit story?”

There was silence. A long moment passed. Then she replied, “I’ve never read any Spirit stories.”

She no doubt saw my eyes widen and and my jaw hit the plate and she realized that she'd shocked the young fanboy. Ann then followed with the most perfect possible punch line, one I’ve never forgotten.

“I married the man, not the cartoonist.”

It was brilliant and put everything in proper perspective about their happy relationship. Will was a multi-faceted and cultured man, as was the better-educated Ann. Whenever I saw them at home they discussed politics and history and theater and cultural matters, but Will never "talked shop” with her, and he never expected her to have any interest in comics. Comic books, when she married Will in 1950, were under considerable public attack, and were looked down upon by nearly all adults. When she was just getting to know Will, his weekly Spirit feature was beginning to wind down, and by the time they married she knew her husband was primarily doing ”advertising” art and work for the government and army involving illustrations. It would never have occurred to a cultured woman like Ann to actually read any comics he had created, most of them done long before they met.

Flash forward, now to the late ‘70s, and another visit to their home, still in New York. By this time comics were gaining some respect. Articles were increasingly coming out praising the form, and Will was getting more and more attention as a progenitor of a new literary/art form. When I visited this time Will had nearly completed Signal From Space (later reprinted in black & white and renamed Life on Another Planet). In his studio I was looking at the original pages he'd completed, and I commented on certain ones that really jumped out at me, including the opening page of Chapter Six. I told him how much I liked the way he had the downpour of rain at the top of the page running down to frame all of the panels. It was a perfect example of what Harvey Kurtzman called “Eisenshpritz.”

“Oh, that page,” he chuckled. “It’s not all rainwater. I had to revise it a bit. My first version had Rocco [a mafioso in sunglasses] pissing in the next-to-last panel to merge with the other flow. But Ann came by, looked over my shoulder and noticed that detail. She said, ‘Will, that’s not you!’… So I changed it. Now it’s much more subtle.”

I said, “Will, I wish you had retained the more overt pissing. But I’m also confused—I thought Ann didn’t even look at your work, and now she’s censoring it?!”

“Not censoring,” he said, still smiling. “She’s trying to protect my reputation. Remember, I’m not an underground cartoonist.”

Flash forward one more time, now to the mid-1980s. This time I’m visiting the Eisners at their Florida home where they’ve recently moved. We’re having dinner. Will had just done a story called “Sunshine in Sunset City” that appeared in Kitchen Sink's Will Eisner’s Quarterly magazine. It was a short story about a lifelong New Yorker, Henry Klop, who sells his business in the city and retires to Florida after his wife has died. The retiree gets involved in an adventure and has a brief fling with a new woman. I had seen an earlier rough of the story but the finished one was expanded, with new front matter.

During dinner I said, “Will, I really love the final version of “Sunset.” I especially like the new pages at the beginning where Klop has flashbacks as he walks through the old neighborhood in a blizzard, with vignettes showing us his earlier life in the city. It put the rest of the story in a much better perspective for me. It made me care more about the lead character.”

Will and Ann glanced at each other. Then after a moment Ann announced with clear pride, “That part was MY idea!”

A bit startled, I said, “Ann! Whoa… When I first got to know you, you had never read any of Will’s comics and you had no interest in them. And now you’re collaborating with him!?” She smiled, acknowledging the slow transformation, and clearly pleased that her plot suggestion had been well-received by Will's publisher. Will was also smiling, happy that her contributing role came up.

Then I turned to Will and with a deadpan expression said, “I think we need to change the name of the magazine to Ann & Will Eisner’s Quarterly!”

For just a second or two I saw Will’s eyes dart at me and saw his brow wrinkle till he quickly realized I was only kidding.

_____________

Will Eisner is famous, a legendary figure in comics. Ann was not famous. But she was crucial in my view to his success. She unwaveringly supported him at all stages of his mature career. Together they survived the deep trauma of losing a teenage daughter to leukemia and almost simultaneously another child for mental health reasons. She patiently indulged her husband when he basked in the attentive adoration of fans at conventions while she made new and close friends in the world of comics. She engineered their move to Florida and took personal charge of the sale of Will’s art. Will always acknowledged that Ann was his anchor, and his primary intellectual stimulant. That she eventually took interest in his graphic novels and then even provided editorial input was a delicious bonus neither ever expected. They were the First Couple of Comics and I adored them both.

11/21/2020

Julian Brier, creator of The Cats of Ostia Antica draws a kick-ass pet portrait!!

The better part of The Cats of Ostia Antica orders. To be sent out today.
11/13/2020

The better part of The Cats of Ostia Antica orders. To be sent out today.

By Julian Brier
11/09/2020

By Julian Brier

Now available from Tinto Press
11/09/2020

Now available from Tinto Press

10/02/2020
Cartoon Crossroads Columbus - CXC

Cartoon Crossroads Columbus - CXC

Columbus is known for many things, and one of its lower keys but steadily consistent byproducts has been cartoonists, and Josh Bayer is a hopeful inheritor of this legacy. An author known as an obsessive practitioner of all sorts of comics, surreal, humorous, and historical, THETH (2014) was considered an early crowning achievement. It’s a tradition once described by Daniel Clowes as the “emotional autobiography”, that THETH emerges from. It’s a book that occupies both a mental landscape and one recognizable as Columbus in the 1980s, and then in 1990 in its sequel, THETH TOMORROW FOREVER.

These books of an isolated punk rock man-child have been Bayer’s most heralded and personal works. It would also be true to say Theth is the story of a city. Intended to spotlight an area of the country during a time it was often eclipsed behind more major metro centers, Columbus is joined into the very DNA of the story.

THETH TOMORROW FOREVER again very much slides in and out of the imagination of its protagonist, and again, it’s cold 2am streets in a pre-gentrified earlier incarnation are staged at story’s heart. This extraordinary time of cheap housing and all-night donut counters allowed artist to thrive (at least, in theory).

Bayer is someone who has involved himself with almost every conceivable facet of the phenomenon of making comics. Over a career where he has been a writer, editor publisher, teacher and craftsman, he has been called a” Rising giant” by Jonathan Letham and “a Visionary artist” by critic Ryan Carey. He is also the subject of an upcoming documentary as well as features in publications like The Comics Journal, Study Group and Strangers Fanzine. Above all he is someone who makes personal work and who is one of Columbus Ohio’s most fiercely devoted proponents.

In this interview with historian and longtime friend Caitlin McGurk, a spotlight is placed on this work and how the town he came from, its music, landscape, schools and people, helped shape the artist and his work.

Josh Bayer will be appearing at CXC online to talk about Theth: Tomorow Forever. Check it out! https://l.facebook.com/l....
09/03/2020
In the City: Josh Bayer’s THETH and Columbus

Josh Bayer will be appearing at CXC online to talk about Theth: Tomorow Forever. Check it out!
https://l.facebook.com/l.php?u=https%3A%2F%2Fcartooncrossroadscolumbus.org%2Fsessions%2Fin-the-city-josh-bayers-theth-and-columbus%2F%3Ffbclid%3DIwAR2dVXhaZcyvBHbYtXtONuHv_xlDBrJsTGayNdGwOSj8DjAJh4ipABMNEb0&h=AT1f4J4PJ_07XuJorghF_xS2jo-Kd3DBEDZfDl4IPRkHVEQF-Lb5znAfRWMwJ5_sVUfWjC3elreNFoIQi673qfIJgXTxZpgkE2FJ-sGgrcPvq1uamKM1oQjsACJhBbqAXLdfmDE_

Columbus is known for many things, and one of its lower keys but steadily consistent byproducts has been cartoonists, and Josh Bayer is a hopeful inheritor of this legacy. An author known as an obs…

Josh Bayer's comic Tomorrow Forever has been nominated for a 2020 Ignatz Award! Best Comic category. Congratulations Jos...
09/01/2020
SPX 2020 Ignatz Nominees | SPX: The Small Press Expo

Josh Bayer's comic Tomorrow Forever has been nominated for a 2020 Ignatz Award! Best Comic category. Congratulations Josh! https://www.smallpressexpo.com/spx-2020-ignatz-nominees

The Ignatz Awards, named after George Herriman’s brick-wielding mouse from his long running comic strip Krazy Kat, recognizes exceptional work that challenges popular notions of what comics can achieve, both as an art form and as a means of personal expression.

Tinto Press stands with the BLM movement and freedom of speech. Please read this article and support this cartoonist. He...
08/05/2020
Black cartoonist's work on race relations and coronavirus prompted newspapers to drop it: 'I am being silenced over white feelings'

Tinto Press stands with the BLM movement and freedom of speech. Please read this article and support this cartoonist.
Her strip being pulled from a newspaper for "angry responses" is a travesty.

https://www.yahoo.com/lifestyle/black-cartoonist-comic-race-relations-coronavirus-cited-as-offensive-005724128.html

The cartoonist's comic depicted two women at the grocery store, one wearing a mask and a George Floyd tribute and the other not.

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Comments

Talking Palettes interview with Ted Intorcio and Julian Brier discussing the new slate of Tinto Press books!
U got me... now intrigued me with your thoughts a Denver are you a native
An amazing array of comics coming out of Tinto Press in 2020! Check them out on Kickstarter today.
Great slate of comics from Tinto Press! Go get it!
Heads up, everyone! Our very own awards director, Ted Intorcio, will be launching the Kickstarter tomorrow at 12 noon MT for Tinto Press' new line of graphic novels. Here's a chance for you to support independent comics. He'll also be livecasting on FB tomorrow so be sure to check out his online party! (totally pandemic safe as it will all take place over the internet) Please share this post! Here's a link to the preview Kickstarter. https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/tinto-press/976711325?ref=t1msfo&token=ea5069b7 Update! Donating funds to a charity is against Kickstarter rules, so plans to donate 10% to the CDP have been thwarted. Instead, Ted will be setting up links to the Covid Response Fund on his website https://TintoPress.com Please consider a donation.
An excerpt from the forthcoming comic, "The Cats of Ostia Antica" by Julian Alexander Brier, published by Tinto Press
This piece by Josh Bayer is just one sampling from his comic book "Tomorrow Forever" - available through Tinto Press.
Look for the upcoming Tomorrow Forever - new perfect bound book. Thanks Tinto Press! Be sure and check their page for more info!
Just saw the Leda Zawacki piece in Birdy - nice!