King James Galleries of Gettysburg

King James Galleries of Gettysburg The gallery is a full service frame shop - we an authorized dealer for P. Buckley Moss, John Paul Strain and Mort Kunstler. Stop by and say hello!
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Located in downtown Historic Gettysburg! We offer a large selection of artwork by prominent historical artists - John Paul Strain & Mort Kunstler. The People's Artist, P. Buckley Moss. Maritime Artist, Tom Freeman. Rod Chase, Tom DuBois. With over 20 years experience in custom framing, we value our customer’s special treasures. All three of our locations will provide the expertise needed to ensure you will get the quality framing and service our galleries are known for.

Operating as usual

Today's the day!  If you are in Gettysburg today between 4 and 6 PM, please stop by and meet Montana Wildlife Artist, Ja...
09/04/2021

Today's the day! If you are in Gettysburg today between 4 and 6 PM, please stop by and meet Montana Wildlife Artist, James Corwin. We are very excited to meet him as well, and share the artwork of this extremely talented artist! See you then!

We are happy to announce that Montana Wildlife Artist, James Corwin will be making a stop by the gallery while visiting ...
08/28/2021

We are happy to announce that Montana Wildlife Artist, James Corwin will be making a stop by the gallery while visiting family in PA! This is his first visit to the gallery so mark your calendars and stop by next Saturday, September 4th....4 to 6 PM for a Meet and Greet Reception for this very talented artist. While this visit is brief, James will be looking for ideas to create a painting of Gettysburg! So if you have any ideas please share them with James when he is here!

Good Morning Everyone,  FYI one of our Artists is celebrating a Birthday on Saturday, August 28th.  I know Mort Kunstler...
08/25/2021

Good Morning Everyone, FYI one of our Artists is celebrating a Birthday on Saturday, August 28th. I know Mort Kunstler would appreciate hearing from you all, so if you get a chance drop him a card in the mail or go to his page to wish him a Happy Birthday! Address: P. O. Box 1776, Oyster Bay, NY 11771

We have lost another great writer to the ages...I have been very fortunate to have met a lot of folks over the years in ...
08/20/2021

We have lost another great writer to the ages...I have been very fortunate to have met a lot of folks over the years in the gallery. One of those VERY interesting people, was Joe Galloway. Joe was a reporter, and with the help of his colleague and friend, General Hal Moore, they wrote a book...We were Soldiers Once....and Young (1992). This book was later adapted to a movie...We Were Soldiers (2002) starring Mel Gibson as Moore and Barry Pepper as Galloway. Artist, Tom Freeman did a painting, titled "Broken Arrow" a number of years ago and officially released the painting here in Gettysburg...the painting depicted Joe and Gen. Moore in Drang Valley, Vietnam. I still have a picture in my home of Joe and Tom unveiling the painting. Joe was definitely one of a kind.... Joe passed away on Tuesday at the age of 79. The Washington Post did a very nice write up on Joe, it's a very good read. Rest in Peace Joe.

BRAND NEW RELEASE! By John Paul StrainWe have our order in on this one, what a striking image!  IF you are interested in...
08/05/2021

BRAND NEW RELEASE! By John Paul Strain
We have our order in on this one, what a striking image! IF you are interested in purchasing, please give us a call.
RAID ON CHAMBERSBURG

General JEB Stuart, General Wade Hampton & Major John Pelham
Potomac River at McCoy’s Ford - October 10, 1862

After the battle of Antietam, General Lee’s Army of Northern Virginia needed time to rest, resupply, and reorganize. General McClellan’s Army of the Potomac was doing the same. But General Lee wished to keep the pressure on the federal army by sending General JEB Stuart’s cavalry back into Maryland and Pennsylvania on a daring raid. If successful, the raid would cut valuable railroad supply lines, obtain anything of value for the army, and basically create havoc, panic, and cause the demoralization of federal troops. Stuart was also instructed to capture government officials who might be exchanged for any captured Confederate leaders or sympathizers. General Lee outlined in detail Stuart’s route, with his main objective being the destruction of the Cumberland Valley Railroad Bridge over the Concocheague Creek near Chambersburg, Pennsylvania.

On October 9th General Stuart and General Wade Hampton left camp with 1800 cavalrymen and four cannons under the command of Major John Pelham. The force crossed the Potomac River at McCoy’s Ford between Williamsport and Hancock on the foggy morning of the 10th. Stuart’s cavalry rode quickly and quietly north avoiding any entanglements. (General Stuart’s cavalry saber scabbard was covered in leather, so as not to make noise while on horseback). Once the force reached the Mason-Dixon Line into Pennsylvania, one-third of Stuart’s men fanned out to seize every healthy horse they could find. Citizens were given Confederate script in return for goods seized.

The expedition eventually crossed the West Branch of Concocheague Creek near the town of Mercersburg. By the time General Stuart’s cavalry reached the town of Chambersburg that evening, the weather had changed with dropping temperatures and cold rain. The town was occupied without incident and Stuart’s men went about their work efficiently, cutting telegraph lines, burning railroad warehouses, confiscating supplies, and so on. Stuart sent a company to burn the railroad bridge at Scotland, but the men turned back after citizens convinced the raiders that the bridge was made of iron. Several dignitaries of the town were taken into custody and General Stuart symbolically appointed General Hampton “Military Governor” of the town.

The following day General Stuart and his command headed back to Virginia by way of Cashtown. The raid was heralded by New York’s Harper’s Weekly as “one of the most surprising feats of the war”. Stuart and his soldiers brought back 1200 horses, supplies, weapons, and a number of prominent politicians, while spreading fear throughout the north. The raid was a great embarrassment to the Federal Army and President Lincoln. It would be just a few weeks later that President Lincoln would replace General George McClellan as commander of the army. The raid would become known as “Stuart’s second ride around McClellan”.

BRAND NEW RELEASE! By John Paul Strain
We have our order in on this one, what a striking image! IF you are interested in purchasing, please give us a call.
RAID ON CHAMBERSBURG

General JEB Stuart, General Wade Hampton & Major John Pelham
Potomac River at McCoy’s Ford - October 10, 1862

After the battle of Antietam, General Lee’s Army of Northern Virginia needed time to rest, resupply, and reorganize. General McClellan’s Army of the Potomac was doing the same. But General Lee wished to keep the pressure on the federal army by sending General JEB Stuart’s cavalry back into Maryland and Pennsylvania on a daring raid. If successful, the raid would cut valuable railroad supply lines, obtain anything of value for the army, and basically create havoc, panic, and cause the demoralization of federal troops. Stuart was also instructed to capture government officials who might be exchanged for any captured Confederate leaders or sympathizers. General Lee outlined in detail Stuart’s route, with his main objective being the destruction of the Cumberland Valley Railroad Bridge over the Concocheague Creek near Chambersburg, Pennsylvania.

On October 9th General Stuart and General Wade Hampton left camp with 1800 cavalrymen and four cannons under the command of Major John Pelham. The force crossed the Potomac River at McCoy’s Ford between Williamsport and Hancock on the foggy morning of the 10th. Stuart’s cavalry rode quickly and quietly north avoiding any entanglements. (General Stuart’s cavalry saber scabbard was covered in leather, so as not to make noise while on horseback). Once the force reached the Mason-Dixon Line into Pennsylvania, one-third of Stuart’s men fanned out to seize every healthy horse they could find. Citizens were given Confederate script in return for goods seized.

The expedition eventually crossed the West Branch of Concocheague Creek near the town of Mercersburg. By the time General Stuart’s cavalry reached the town of Chambersburg that evening, the weather had changed with dropping temperatures and cold rain. The town was occupied without incident and Stuart’s men went about their work efficiently, cutting telegraph lines, burning railroad warehouses, confiscating supplies, and so on. Stuart sent a company to burn the railroad bridge at Scotland, but the men turned back after citizens convinced the raiders that the bridge was made of iron. Several dignitaries of the town were taken into custody and General Stuart symbolically appointed General Hampton “Military Governor” of the town.

The following day General Stuart and his command headed back to Virginia by way of Cashtown. The raid was heralded by New York’s Harper’s Weekly as “one of the most surprising feats of the war”. Stuart and his soldiers brought back 1200 horses, supplies, weapons, and a number of prominent politicians, while spreading fear throughout the north. The raid was a great embarrassment to the Federal Army and President Lincoln. It would be just a few weeks later that President Lincoln would replace General George McClellan as commander of the army. The raid would become known as “Stuart’s second ride around McClellan”.

Good day everyone!  I want to highlight an image that would have taken place on July 16, 1812!  The image is titled "Cat...
07/13/2021

Good day everyone! I want to highlight an image that would have taken place on July 16, 1812! The image is titled "Catch Me if You Can" (also known as The Great Chase) by Maritime Artist, Tom Freeman. History places this event just off the coast of Egg Harbor, New Jersey!
Less than a month after the United States declared war on Great Britain, USS CONSTITUTION, under the command of Capt. Isaac Hull, was en route to New York, to join Commodore John Rodgers' squadron. Off the coast of Egg Harbor, NJ, she spent more than 50 hours outmaneuvering five English warships (HMS Aeolus, HMS Africa, HMS Belvidera, HMS GUERRIERE and HMS Shannon) in an agonizingly slow motion chase that proved her commanding officer’s leadership, her new crew’s teamwork, and her own ability to sail. In short, she demonstrated her readiness for the war and battles that lay ahead.
By about 4 p.m. on July 18, USS CONSTITUTION had a 3-4 mile lead over her nearest pursuer. Hull ordered his men to shorten the ship’s sails in preparation for a squall a few hours later, and when the British ships did the same, the American captain unfurled the ship’s sails. USS CONSTITUTION raced away at 11 knots, almost her top operating speed, and the Royal Navy ships gave up the chase early the next morning.
Tom did a number of paintings on the USS Constitution! I hope you enjoy taking a look at "Catch Me if You Can

Good day everyone! I want to highlight an image that would have taken place on July 16, 1812! The image is titled "Catch Me if You Can" (also known as The Great Chase) by Maritime Artist, Tom Freeman. History places this event just off the coast of Egg Harbor, New Jersey!
Less than a month after the United States declared war on Great Britain, USS CONSTITUTION, under the command of Capt. Isaac Hull, was en route to New York, to join Commodore John Rodgers' squadron. Off the coast of Egg Harbor, NJ, she spent more than 50 hours outmaneuvering five English warships (HMS Aeolus, HMS Africa, HMS Belvidera, HMS GUERRIERE and HMS Shannon) in an agonizingly slow motion chase that proved her commanding officer’s leadership, her new crew’s teamwork, and her own ability to sail. In short, she demonstrated her readiness for the war and battles that lay ahead.
By about 4 p.m. on July 18, USS CONSTITUTION had a 3-4 mile lead over her nearest pursuer. Hull ordered his men to shorten the ship’s sails in preparation for a squall a few hours later, and when the British ships did the same, the American captain unfurled the ship’s sails. USS CONSTITUTION raced away at 11 knots, almost her top operating speed, and the Royal Navy ships gave up the chase early the next morning.
Tom did a number of paintings on the USS Constitution! I hope you enjoy taking a look at "Catch Me if You Can

Today in Gettysburg's history - July 4th, 1863....The guns of Gettysburg were silent.  The raging battle of three days w...
07/04/2021

Today in Gettysburg's history - July 4th, 1863....The guns of Gettysburg were silent. The raging battle of three days was over. The Federal Army held the field and the Army of Northern Virginia was in retreat heading south. The morning of July 4 was clear and sunny, but heavy rain would soon move into the area in the early afternoon. Col. Joshua Lawrence Chamberlain of the 20th Maine returned to Little Round Top that morning to honor and bid farewell to his fallen soldiers.
Chamberlain wrote, "We returned to Little Round Top where we buried our dead in the place where we had laid them during the fight, marking each grave by a headboard of ammunition boxes with each soldier's name cut upon it."
Chamberlain wrote of his sadness as he looked upon his men who had given all. Describing one young man he wrote, "fair young face the sweet mother-look had come out under death's soft whisper.” He continued, “The men were placed in a single wide grave with touch of elbow still......in a sunny hillside nook."
"We also buried 50 of the enemy's dead in front of our position of July 2. We then looked after our wounded, whom I had taken responsibility of putting into the houses of citizens in the vicinity of Little Round Top, and on the morning of the 5th, took up our March on the Emmitsburg road."
Chamberlain returned to his regiment as the rain began to fall. He was limping and hurt from injuries sustained in the battle. His left thigh was bruised where a minie' ball had struck his scabbard slamming his leg. His right instep had been cut through his boot by a piece of shrapnel from an exploding shell. It was with sadness that Chamberlain returned to his regiment. He would never forget the battle for Little Round Top nor his men who had given their lives now resting in sacred ground.

Today in Gettysburg's history - July 4th, 1863....The guns of Gettysburg were silent. The raging battle of three days was over. The Federal Army held the field and the Army of Northern Virginia was in retreat heading south. The morning of July 4 was clear and sunny, but heavy rain would soon move into the area in the early afternoon. Col. Joshua Lawrence Chamberlain of the 20th Maine returned to Little Round Top that morning to honor and bid farewell to his fallen soldiers.
Chamberlain wrote, "We returned to Little Round Top where we buried our dead in the place where we had laid them during the fight, marking each grave by a headboard of ammunition boxes with each soldier's name cut upon it."
Chamberlain wrote of his sadness as he looked upon his men who had given all. Describing one young man he wrote, "fair young face the sweet mother-look had come out under death's soft whisper.” He continued, “The men were placed in a single wide grave with touch of elbow still......in a sunny hillside nook."
"We also buried 50 of the enemy's dead in front of our position of July 2. We then looked after our wounded, whom I had taken responsibility of putting into the houses of citizens in the vicinity of Little Round Top, and on the morning of the 5th, took up our March on the Emmitsburg road."
Chamberlain returned to his regiment as the rain began to fall. He was limping and hurt from injuries sustained in the battle. His left thigh was bruised where a minie' ball had struck his scabbard slamming his leg. His right instep had been cut through his boot by a piece of shrapnel from an exploding shell. It was with sadness that Chamberlain returned to his regiment. He would never forget the battle for Little Round Top nor his men who had given their lives now resting in sacred ground.

Happy 4th of July everyone!
07/04/2021

Happy 4th of July everyone!

Happy 4th of July everyone!

Hello everyone!  The 158th commemoration of the Battle of Gettysburg has begun!  IF you find yourselves in our lovely, h...
07/01/2021

Hello everyone! The 158th commemoration of the Battle of Gettysburg has begun! IF you find yourselves in our lovely, historic town Friday or Saturday....stop by the gallery. I just got word from the Confederation of Union Generals that Gen. Buford, and several of his counterparts will be visiting the gallery from 4 - 5 PM both of those days. This is a great opportunity to visit, ask questions and listen to these living historians reminisce about their adventures and their lives! See you soon!

Hello everyone! The 158th commemoration of the Battle of Gettysburg has begun! IF you find yourselves in our lovely, historic town Friday or Saturday....stop by the gallery. I just got word from the Confederation of Union Generals that Gen. Buford, and several of his counterparts will be visiting the gallery from 4 - 5 PM both of those days. This is a great opportunity to visit, ask questions and listen to these living historians reminisce about their adventures and their lives! See you soon!

06/23/2021
06/23/2021

Hey friends, don't forget to tune in this afternoon at 3 pm....live facebook post from yours' truly! Let's catch up!

While it is a few months off, we wanted you all to know...Artist, P. Buckley Moss will be making an appearance at the ga...
06/19/2021
3D Tours - Eisenhower National Historic Site (U.S. National Park Service)

While it is a few months off, we wanted you all to know...
Artist, P. Buckley Moss will be making an appearance at the gallery on Saturday, October 16, 2021. There will be a NEW print release, I just got a peak at the original last week and you won't want to miss this one. The title is "The President's Home...anyone want to take a guess at what this image depicts?? More information will follow in the upcoming months...but save the date!

06/19/2021

Good Morning Everyone! Hope this beautiful Saturday is going well for you. I have had a number of you ask me about the live posts....I have not done one in a while...so glad you all enjoy them. I will be doing a new one this coming week on Wednesday, June 23rd at 3 PM. And since we are quickly coming up to the commemoration of the Battle of Gettysburg (June 30 - July 4) I will be doing several others...so stay tune! Oh, and if anyone has a particular subject I haven't covered, let me know. See you on Wednesday, June 23rd!

Address

15 Baltimore St
Gettysburg, PA
17325

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Tuesday 9am - 5pm
Wednesday 9am - 5pm
Thursday 10am - 6pm
Friday 10am - 6pm
Saturday 10am - 6pm

Telephone

(717) 398-2034

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Comments

The raffle for the P Buckley Moss Foundation for children’s Education Price for ticket is $3.00 or 2 for $5.00
Do you know who won the drawing for the quilt?
Are we allowed to bring prints we already own for P. Buckley Moss to sign them? Thanks!
Great place to shop for historical art because of the wonderful selection and especially, the wonderful people who work there !!! Go, King James Galleries !!! ( and Go-Debra !!! )