The Blackhouse Foundation

The Blackhouse Foundation The Blackhouse Foundation believes in the importance & power of diversity in film. Our goal: expand opportunities, increase knowledge & provide support for Black filmmakers in the US & abroad via partnerships w/the world's most prominent festivals.

Follow us on twitter: http://twitter.com/the_blackhouse

Follow us on twitter: http://twitter.com/the_blackhouse

Operating as usual

09/12/2021

Flashing back to that time we cooked with #MetGala chef @sonofasouthernchef at the #2021sundancefilmfestival Repost from @voguemagazine

There’s only one short day until the 2021 #MetGala!
This year the @metcostumeinstitute’s Met Gala will feature a sustainable plant-based menu, featuring recipes from ten up-and-coming chefs based in New York City—and we’re giving you a sneak peek at who they are and the delicious recipes they have created.

Meet the #MetGalaChefs: In this video we introduce, Lazarus Lynch (@sonofasouthernchef) who demonstrates how to prepare Jerk Corn with Coconut Confetti. Make sure to show us how you cooked like our #MetGalachefs.
Directed by @jeremyjacobowitz

09/06/2021

Repost from @kelleylcarter

“I subscribe to the narrative that addiction is a sickness. It’s something that people don't choose do. We don't get up and decide to become addicts and alcoholics though, that is a coping mechanism that we, that people use because they have the inability to deal with other things in life. So to take advantage of someone else like taking advantage of someone with cancer or diabetes. And from my perspective, it's the same. And there's something that is extra deplorable about that. “ RIP #michaelkwilliams 🙏🏿❤️

Congratulations to the great writers who participated in this landmark program. Thank you to our partners, Participant M...
08/19/2021
Television Screenwriting Lab for Black Muslim Writers Wraps

Congratulations to the great writers who participated in this landmark program. Thank you to our partners, Participant Media and Muslim Public Affairs Council - MPAC Hollywood Bureau.

The lab was led by The Blackhouse Foundation and the Muslim Public Affairs Council's Hollywood Bureau

08/18/2021
t’s a Cultural Differnce— Period.

Repost from @americanblackfilmfestival

It’s a Cultural Differnce— Period.

Denzel Washington on #AugustWilson wanting a black director for @FencesMovie
🔁@juveeproductions

#BlackDirectorsMatter

BIG NEWS! Howard University's MFA in Film Program joins The Hollywood Reporter's 2021 list of Top American Film Schools!...
08/16/2021
2021’s Top 25 American Film Schools, Ranked

BIG NEWS! Howard University's MFA in Film Program joins The Hollywood Reporter's 2021 list of Top American Film Schools!

We’re also proud to partner with NYU, USC, Chapman, Columbia, LMU, all in this list.

COVID sidelined much of the 2020-21 academic year, but these premier programs — from NYU to USC — are ready for a return to normal, with a few new wrinkles.

Don’t forget about us @tambayobenson Repost from @tambayobenson•#FBF - That time in 2013 when I participated in a #Tribe...
08/07/2021

Don’t forget about us @tambayobenson Repost from @tambayobenson

#FBF - That time in 2013 when I participated in a #TribecaFilmFestival Industry panel with Nelson George, Terence Nance and Frida Torresblanco, moderated by Beth Janson. #TribecaTalks

Repost from @1972project•According to the National Partnership for Women and Families, the wages of Black women are driv...
08/03/2021

Repost from @1972project

According to the National Partnership for Women and Families, the wages of Black women are driven down by a number of factors including gender and racial discrimination, workplace, harassment, job segregation and a lack of workplace policies that support family caregiving, which is still most often performed by women. How can you take action for change?

#BlackWomensEqualPay #EqualPayCA

Repost from @newyorkermag•You have to start somewhere! #NewYorkerCartoons🖋️ @willmcphail4
07/29/2021

Repost from @newyorkermag

You have to start somewhere! #NewYorkerCartoons
🖋️ @willmcphail4

Repost from @newyorkermag

You have to start somewhere! #NewYorkerCartoons
🖋️ @willmcphail4

Repost from @afrocentricfilmscollaborative•“I love being Black.”— Daniel Kaluuya
07/26/2021

Repost from @afrocentricfilmscollaborative

“I love being Black.”

— Daniel Kaluuya

Repost from @afrocentricfilmscollaborative

“I love being Black.”

— Daniel Kaluuya

When Blackhouse board chair, @bricksond, describes how we count the number of Black films in a festival line-up he says,...
07/23/2021

When Blackhouse board chair, @bricksond, describes how we count the number of Black films in a festival line-up he says, “Black Director, Black subject matter or up to third lead. If Danny Glover is in your movie, we count it.” Congratulations and thank you for all you do for independent Black cinema, @officialdannyglover #dannyglover Repost from @theacademy

What's your favorite Danny Glover film?

Glover will be honored with the Jean Hersholt Humanitarian Award presented at the Governors Awards on Saturday, January 15, 2022.

Repost from @bcgmag•The First Black Woman To Write & Produce A Movie: Maria Williams was a social activist and teacher b...
07/23/2021

Repost from @bcgmag

The First Black Woman To Write & Produce A Movie:

Maria Williams was a social activist and teacher born January 1, 1866. She dared to be the first to do something other women had not; producing and directing films.⁠

She was the first Black woman to produce, write, and act in her own movie in 1923, The Flames of Wrath. Thanks to her early accomplishment, we have female directors and producers like Oprah, Ava DuVernay, and Shonda Rhimes. ⁠

Beyond film, this former Kansas City teacher was also an activist, and detailed her leadership skills in the book she authored, My Work and Public Sentiment in 1916.⁠

Sadly, she was shot to death in the street in 1932, a crime never solved⁠… (via: @black_history_buff_777)

Repost from @bcgmag

The First Black Woman To Write & Produce A Movie:

Maria Williams was a social activist and teacher born January 1, 1866. She dared to be the first to do something other women had not; producing and directing films.⁠

She was the first Black woman to produce, write, and act in her own movie in 1923, The Flames of Wrath. Thanks to her early accomplishment, we have female directors and producers like Oprah, Ava DuVernay, and Shonda Rhimes. ⁠

Beyond film, this former Kansas City teacher was also an activist, and detailed her leadership skills in the book she authored, My Work and Public Sentiment in 1916.⁠

Sadly, she was shot to death in the street in 1932, a crime never solved⁠… (via: @black_history_buff_777)

Repost from @theadvocatemag•This year's #EmmyNoms are full of q***r excellence, starting with @PoseOnFX star @MjRodrigue...
07/14/2021

Repost from @theadvocatemag

This year's #EmmyNoms are full of q***r excellence, starting with @PoseOnFX star @MjRodriguez7, who made history as the first transgender lead actor ever nominated. If she wins for Outstanding Lead Actress in a Drama Series, she will be the first ever trans performer to win an Emmy.⁠

Other LGBTQ+ honors include @theebillyporter for #Pose, Bowen Yang (@fayedunaway) and @danjlevy for their respective roles on #SNL, and q***r nonbinary actor @emmalouisecorrin for #TheCrown. Click the link in our bio for details.

Repost from @theadvocatemag

This year's #EmmyNoms are full of q***r excellence, starting with @PoseOnFX star @MjRodriguez7, who made history as the first transgender lead actor ever nominated. If she wins for Outstanding Lead Actress in a Drama Series, she will be the first ever trans performer to win an Emmy.⁠

Other LGBTQ+ honors include @theebillyporter for #Pose, Bowen Yang (@fayedunaway) and @danjlevy for their respective roles on #SNL, and q***r nonbinary actor @emmalouisecorrin for #TheCrown. Click the link in our bio for details.

Repost from @wilsonmoralesfilm•Emmy nominated for Made-for-Televison Movie is Sylvie's Love
07/14/2021

Repost from @wilsonmoralesfilm

Emmy nominated for Made-for-Televison Movie is Sylvie's Love

Repost from @wilsonmoralesfilm

Emmy nominated for Made-for-Televison Movie is Sylvie's Love

Repost from @festivaldecannes•✨Montée des Marches de LINGUI (LINGUI, LES LIENS SACRÉS de Mahamat-Saleh HAROUNavec Mahama...
07/08/2021

Repost from @festivaldecannes

✨Montée des Marches de LINGUI (LINGUI, LES LIENS SACRÉS de Mahamat-Saleh HAROUN
avec Mahamat-Saleh HAROUN, Achouackh ABAKAR, Rihane Khalil ALIO et invitée



✨Red Carpet of LINGUI (LINGUI, THE SACRED BONDS by Mahamat-Saleh HAROUN
with Mahamat-Saleh HAROUN, Achouackh ABAKAR, Rihane Khalil ALIO and guest

#Cannes2021 #Cannes74 #RedSteps #SelectionOfficielle #OfficialSelection #Competition

Repost from @festivaldecannes

✨Montée des Marches de LINGUI (LINGUI, LES LIENS SACRÉS de Mahamat-Saleh HAROUN
avec Mahamat-Saleh HAROUN, Achouackh ABAKAR, Rihane Khalil ALIO et invitée



✨Red Carpet of LINGUI (LINGUI, THE SACRED BONDS by Mahamat-Saleh HAROUN
with Mahamat-Saleh HAROUN, Achouackh ABAKAR, Rihane Khalil ALIO and guest

#Cannes2021 #Cannes74 #RedSteps #SelectionOfficielle #OfficialSelection #Competition

Repost from @blackartinamerica_•Tag us with your #flagart #4thofjuly . . .Reposted from @jamescharlesmorris The bodies t...
07/04/2021

Repost from @blackartinamerica_

Tag us with your #flagart #4thofjuly
. . .
Reposted from @jamescharlesmorris The bodies that carry our spirits should be valued, not just when it's convenient, not just when you benefit, and sure as hell not just for our culture. Too many have been lost senselessly and for what? Not just counting those whose lives have been lost at the hands of the police but also those who have lost their lives senselessly in their own communities based on the effects of a system that continues to marginalize and discredit them. The stress of being black in America can not even begin to be measured. There are so many elements that are used to cause harm whether it be those who disvalue us because of our skin color, or those who continue to dehumanize us based upon a mental instability caused by divisive and hateful teachings or those who have been systematically taught to hate the ones who look like them. This moment in time has shown the continued ugliness and hypocrisy of this nation, and anyone who wants to continue "conserve" this will get exactly what they deserve. A great nation begins when it acknowledges it's faults and builds from it's mistakes and works to seek redemption and if this nation truly wants to be great, then it needs to be accountable for every action that has and continues to cause harm to the souls that it oppresses.

Repost from @blackartinamerica_

Tag us with your #flagart #4thofjuly
. . .
Reposted from @jamescharlesmorris The bodies that carry our spirits should be valued, not just when it's convenient, not just when you benefit, and sure as hell not just for our culture. Too many have been lost senselessly and for what? Not just counting those whose lives have been lost at the hands of the police but also those who have lost their lives senselessly in their own communities based on the effects of a system that continues to marginalize and discredit them. The stress of being black in America can not even begin to be measured. There are so many elements that are used to cause harm whether it be those who disvalue us because of our skin color, or those who continue to dehumanize us based upon a mental instability caused by divisive and hateful teachings or those who have been systematically taught to hate the ones who look like them. This moment in time has shown the continued ugliness and hypocrisy of this nation, and anyone who wants to continue "conserve" this will get exactly what they deserve. A great nation begins when it acknowledges it's faults and builds from it's mistakes and works to seek redemption and if this nation truly wants to be great, then it needs to be accountable for every action that has and continues to cause harm to the souls that it oppresses.

Repost from @ebonymagazine•Her selection as the first Black American woman director to the prestigious Criterion Collect...
07/04/2021

Repost from @ebonymagazine

Her selection as the first Black American woman director to the prestigious Criterion Collection, which seeks to preserve a select number of classic and contemporary films representing the best of the artform, is recognition of the enduring power of a coming-of-age story about a young Black girl evolving into herself and her identity as a q***r woman, as well as her genius as a director. Dee Rees joins Martinique’s Euzhan Palcy and her 1989 film A Dry White Season in what is today a sorority of just two Black women in a mostly white, all-boys club.
⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
For Rees, now in her early 40s, Pariah was a journey much longer than its feature film release date suggests. Instead, it’s a story the Nashville native had, at that point in her personal evolution, been writing her entire life. “I first wrote Pariah back in 2005 or so. And it’s funny because I first wrote the feature version and, for me, personally, I was going through my own coming out process,” she says. When she needed a short film to graduate from school, she turned to this story and the result, she says, “felt explosive.”
⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
✍🏾/ Ronda Racha Penrice
⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
Read more at EBONY.com

Repost from @wilsonmoralesfilm•From Variety's @ange814 - Congrats to director Dee Rees, who made history on June 29 when...
07/03/2021

Repost from @wilsonmoralesfilm

From Variety's @ange814 - Congrats to director Dee Rees, who made history on June 29 when her debut feature “Pariah” joined the Criterion Collection, making the Oscar and Emmy nominee the first Black American woman to have her work included.

Teenage Alike (Adepero Oduye) lives in Brooklyn's Fort Greene neighborhood with her parents (Charles Parnell, Kim Wayans) and younger sister (Sahra Mellesse). A le***an, Alike quietly embraces her identity and is looking for her first lover, but she wonders how much she can truly confide in her family, especially with her parents' marriage already strained. When Alike's mother presses her to befriend a colleague's daughter (Aasha Davis), Alike finds the gal to be a pleasant companion.

Among the special features in the Criterion release is a cast reunion with Rees and actors Oduye, Pernell Walker, Kim Wayans, Charles Parnell, and Aasha Davis. There’s also a behind the scenes look at the making of the film, featuring Rees, cinematographer Bradford Young, production designer Inbal Weinberg, producer Nekisa Cooper, and editor Mako Kamitsuna.

Before Rees, Euzhan Palcy, who is from Martinique, was the lone Black woman to have a film (1989’s “A Dry White Season”) selected.

Only eight Black filmmakers’ work had been featured in the collection. Four Black American directors were represented — Charles Burnett (1990’s “To Sleep With Anger”), Spike Lee (1989’s “Do the Right Thing” and 2000’s “Bamboozled”), William Greaves (1968’s “Symbiopsychotaxiplasm: Take One” and 2005’s “Symbiopsychotaxiplasm Take 2 1/2”) and Oscar Micheaux (1925’s “Body and Soul”) — with four Black directors from outside the U.S. also selected — including Palcy, Steve McQueen (Britain, 2008’s “Hunger”), Djibril Diop Mambéty (Senegal, 1973’s “Touki Bouki”) and Ousmane Sembène (Senegal, 1966’s “Black Girl”).

Rees won’t be the only Black American woman represented for long, as Gina Prince-Bythewood’s “Love and Basketball” will be released in September. (Bill Duke and Melvin Van Peebles’ works are also set to be added to Criterion in coming months.)

Repost from @wilsonmoralesfilm

From Variety's @ange814 - Congrats to director Dee Rees, who made history on June 29 when her debut feature “Pariah” joined the Criterion Collection, making the Oscar and Emmy nominee the first Black American woman to have her work included.

Teenage Alike (Adepero Oduye) lives in Brooklyn's Fort Greene neighborhood with her parents (Charles Parnell, Kim Wayans) and younger sister (Sahra Mellesse). A le***an, Alike quietly embraces her identity and is looking for her first lover, but she wonders how much she can truly confide in her family, especially with her parents' marriage already strained. When Alike's mother presses her to befriend a colleague's daughter (Aasha Davis), Alike finds the gal to be a pleasant companion.

Among the special features in the Criterion release is a cast reunion with Rees and actors Oduye, Pernell Walker, Kim Wayans, Charles Parnell, and Aasha Davis. There’s also a behind the scenes look at the making of the film, featuring Rees, cinematographer Bradford Young, production designer Inbal Weinberg, producer Nekisa Cooper, and editor Mako Kamitsuna.

Before Rees, Euzhan Palcy, who is from Martinique, was the lone Black woman to have a film (1989’s “A Dry White Season”) selected.

Only eight Black filmmakers’ work had been featured in the collection. Four Black American directors were represented — Charles Burnett (1990’s “To Sleep With Anger”), Spike Lee (1989’s “Do the Right Thing” and 2000’s “Bamboozled”), William Greaves (1968’s “Symbiopsychotaxiplasm: Take One” and 2005’s “Symbiopsychotaxiplasm Take 2 1/2”) and Oscar Micheaux (1925’s “Body and Soul”) — with four Black directors from outside the U.S. also selected — including Palcy, Steve McQueen (Britain, 2008’s “Hunger”), Djibril Diop Mambéty (Senegal, 1973’s “Touki Bouki”) and Ousmane Sembène (Senegal, 1966’s “Black Girl”).

Rees won’t be the only Black American woman represented for long, as Gina Prince-Bythewood’s “Love and Basketball” will be released in September. (Bill Duke and Melvin Van Peebles’ works are also set to be added to Criterion in coming months.)

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Comments

Sundance . . . Is coming!
We are very excited here in the Midwest to invite all of your followers to join us on Nov. 2 at our first regional In Motion Conference. All of the profits will benefit the organization Continuity STL, where we teach underrepresented talent the art of filmmaking. We address the disparities and lack of equity in the film and media production industry by offering a 38 week class, free of charge. Thank you for making a difference! https://www.inmotionconference.com
John Singleton embRace LA Short Film Competition
Hi Blackhouse Screenwriters! There’s an opportunity I wanted to bring to your attention. My name’s Mallom Liggon, and I’m an African American Screenwriting student at Loyola Marymount University. The past months I’ve been working on Diverso, a non-profit that aims to become a student-run film fund. We have partnered up with The Black List and United Talent Agency to launch our first initiative, The Minority Report, a list of 10 “most liked” scripts written by diverse students. Scripts are reviewed by a jury board that includes: Adele Lim (Crazy Rich Asians), Christine Vachon (Carol), Deniese Davis (Issa Rae Productions), and Loretha Jones (Former Head of OG Content @ BET). Multiple agents and managers have committed to review the list, from 3Arts, Anonymous Content, APA, and more. Top writers will receive free 3-month hosting on The Black List. I know there are talented writers in this group, and I’d love to have your scripts considered. If interested, submit at this link: https://filmfreeway.com/TheMinorityReport?fbclid=IwAR2AT6psq9DZS_zHojxa6NxLBoAOSyElwwA-z-WxvQY_L-oeLf0WRhsx6Xk Thank You and Best of Luck!
Cant wait to see everybody again this year.
Well done!!
Hey you guys... work at The Source and we are looking to distribute short films and scripted content on our new platform. Please let me know if you are interested in submitting. If so, please email me at [email protected]. We will be reviewing over the next two weeks.
Respect and Protect The Black Woman!!