Aquila Polonica - Poland WW2

Aquila Polonica - Poland WW2 This page represents Aquila Polonica Publishing, which specializes in the Polish experience of World War II. Visit us at: http://www.polandww2.com
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Aquila Polonica is an award-winning independent publisher based in Los Angeles, specializing in publishing, in English, the World War II experience of Poland—the first of the Allies to fight Hi**er. It is a member of the Association of American Publishers and the Independent Book Publishers Association. Its titles are distributed by National Book Network, www.nbnbooks.com. All of its books to date have won awards. They’ve garnered rave reviews in major media such as the New York Times, New Republic and Atlantic; most have been Selections of the History Book Club, Military Book Club and/or Book-of-the-Month Club. They’ve been translated to foreign languages and licensed as audiobooks. See more at: www.AquilaPolonica.com. For review copies, email [email protected]

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Operating as usual

May 8, 1945: “VE Day”—Victory in Europe! World War II in Europe ends. Hi**er had committed su***de a few days earlier, o...
05/08/2021

May 8, 1945: “VE Day”—Victory in Europe! World War II in Europe ends. Hi**er had committed su***de a few days earlier, on April 30th, during the Battle of Berlin. Admiral Karl Dönitz, who in accordance with Hi**er's last will and testament was named President of Germany and Supreme Commander of its Armed Forces, ordered “all forces under German control to cease active operations at 23:01 hours Central European Time on 8 May 1945." The war, which had begun in September 1939 with the Invasion of Poland, had finally ended with the defeat of N**i Germany.

Yet the victory was more bitter than sweet for the Polish soldiers who had fought with the Western Allies throughout all 6 years of conflict. Their struggle for freedom had ended, but America and Britain had consigned Poland to the Soviet sphere of influence. In a sense, the ideals these brave soldiers fought for would not be realized until 50 years after the war began, with the fall of communism in 1989.

May 8, 1945: “VE Day”—Victory in Europe! World War II in Europe ends. Hi**er had committed su***de a few days earlier, on April 30th, during the Battle of Berlin. Admiral Karl Dönitz, who in accordance with Hi**er's last will and testament was named President of Germany and Supreme Commander of its Armed Forces, ordered “all forces under German control to cease active operations at 23:01 hours Central European Time on 8 May 1945." The war, which had begun in September 1939 with the Invasion of Poland, had finally ended with the defeat of N**i Germany.

Yet the victory was more bitter than sweet for the Polish soldiers who had fought with the Western Allies throughout all 6 years of conflict. Their struggle for freedom had ended, but America and Britain had consigned Poland to the Soviet sphere of influence. In a sense, the ideals these brave soldiers fought for would not be realized until 50 years after the war began, with the fall of communism in 1989.

General Stanislaw Sosabowski, born on May 8, 1892, is best known for commanding the elite Polish 1st Independent Parachu...
05/07/2021

General Stanislaw Sosabowski, born on May 8, 1892, is best known for commanding the elite Polish 1st Independent Parachute Brigade during WWII. As a career officer in the Polish army, he was severely wounded during WWI, and fought during the 1939 invasion of Poland and the 1940 French campaign. In 1942, he formed the Parachute Brigade with plans to airdrop into Poland during a national uprising. However, this became impossible during the 1944 Warsaw Uprising, because the Soviet Union refused to allow Allied transport planes to land and refuel.

Sosabowski and his troops participated in the ill-fated September 1944 Operation Market Garden. The Brigade fought around the Dutch city of Arnhem and suffered heavy casualties attempting to rescue the British 1st Airborne Division. Sosabowski is portrayed by Gene Hackman in the feature film “A Bridge Too Far,” which dramatized Operation Market Garden.

The Brigade saw no more action until after the war’s end, when they garrisoned the German city of Wilhelmshaven. Sosabowski (along with all Polish forces in the West) was demobilized in 1948. His family emigrated from Poland and they lived in London, where Sosabowski found employment as a factory worker. He was awarded military honors from Poland, Great Britain, and the Netherlands for his military service. Sosabowski died in 1967, and is now buried at the Powazki Military Cemetery in Warsaw.

General Stanislaw Sosabowski, born on May 8, 1892, is best known for commanding the elite Polish 1st Independent Parachute Brigade during WWII. As a career officer in the Polish army, he was severely wounded during WWI, and fought during the 1939 invasion of Poland and the 1940 French campaign. In 1942, he formed the Parachute Brigade with plans to airdrop into Poland during a national uprising. However, this became impossible during the 1944 Warsaw Uprising, because the Soviet Union refused to allow Allied transport planes to land and refuel.

Sosabowski and his troops participated in the ill-fated September 1944 Operation Market Garden. The Brigade fought around the Dutch city of Arnhem and suffered heavy casualties attempting to rescue the British 1st Airborne Division. Sosabowski is portrayed by Gene Hackman in the feature film “A Bridge Too Far,” which dramatized Operation Market Garden.

The Brigade saw no more action until after the war’s end, when they garrisoned the German city of Wilhelmshaven. Sosabowski (along with all Polish forces in the West) was demobilized in 1948. His family emigrated from Poland and they lived in London, where Sosabowski found employment as a factory worker. He was awarded military honors from Poland, Great Britain, and the Netherlands for his military service. Sosabowski died in 1967, and is now buried at the Powazki Military Cemetery in Warsaw.

May 6, 1945: General Stanislaw Maczek’s 1st Armored Division accepts the surrender of the German naval base at Wilhelmsh...
05/06/2021

May 6, 1945: General Stanislaw Maczek’s 1st Armored Division accepts the surrender of the German naval base at Wilhelmshaven. 32,000 soldiers and 1,900 officers were taken prisoner, including a general and two admirals. Following the formal surrender of Germany on May 8, General Maczek was appointed commander of the Polish I Corps and charged with the administration of a 6,500 square kilometer area around Wilhelmshaven.

According to Mr. Jan Niebrzydowski’s article on the 1st Armored Division in the March 2013 issue of “Bulletin of the Polonus Philatelic Society,” the area under Polish I Corps administration resembled a mini-Polish state. 5,000 Polish refugees from German labor and POW camps reunited with their fellow countrymen in Maczek’s zone. The German town of Haren, within I Corps zone, became known as “Maczkow” during this time. The I Polish Corps administrated the area around Wilhemshaven until 1948.

May 6, 1945: General Stanislaw Maczek’s 1st Armored Division accepts the surrender of the German naval base at Wilhelmshaven. 32,000 soldiers and 1,900 officers were taken prisoner, including a general and two admirals. Following the formal surrender of Germany on May 8, General Maczek was appointed commander of the Polish I Corps and charged with the administration of a 6,500 square kilometer area around Wilhelmshaven.

According to Mr. Jan Niebrzydowski’s article on the 1st Armored Division in the March 2013 issue of “Bulletin of the Polonus Philatelic Society,” the area under Polish I Corps administration resembled a mini-Polish state. 5,000 Polish refugees from German labor and POW camps reunited with their fellow countrymen in Maczek’s zone. The German town of Haren, within I Corps zone, became known as “Maczkow” during this time. The I Polish Corps administrated the area around Wilhemshaven until 1948.

"A Polish family who saved Shevah Weiss – who later became Israel’s ambassador to Poland and speaker of its parliament, ...
05/05/2021
Polish family who saved future Israeli ambassador from Holocaust found seven decades later

"A Polish family who saved Shevah Weiss – who later became Israel’s ambassador to Poland and speaker of its parliament, the Knesset – from the Holocaust has been discovered over seven decades later. Weiss himself has thanked the journalists who found his rescuers."

Read about this amazing story at Notes from Poland:
https://notesfrompoland.com/2021/05/04/polish-family-who-saved-future-israeli-ambassador-from-holocaust-found-seven-decades-later/

A Polish family who saved Shevah Weiss, a future Israeli ambassador to Poland, and his family from the Holocaust has been found.

Night of May 4, 1942: the Polish destroyer ORP Błyskawica defends the British seaport of Cowes from a Luftwaffe attack o...
05/04/2021

Night of May 4, 1942: the Polish destroyer ORP Błyskawica defends the British seaport of Cowes from a Luftwaffe attack of 160 bombers during the Baedeker Blitz.

The ORP Błyskawica was in Cowes for refitting at the J. Samuel White shipyard at the time. Before World War II, the destroyer and her sister ship ORP Grom were built there at the request of the 2nd Polish Republic.

Cowes was small, strategically nonessential, and considered unlikely to be the target of such a large attack. The Free French garrison in the area lacked antiaircraft artillery. Yet, the ORP Błyskawica was a modern heavy destroyer. Her 8 4-inch guns were a serious threat to the German bombers, who had to climb high to avoid direct hits. She also laid a smokescreen over the town to further frustrate the accuracy of the bombardiers. The ship’s barrage was so intense, that buckets of water had to be splashed onto the overheating barrels. After the raids passed, the Polish crew landed and aided in recovery efforts.

While 70 people perished in the attack, the massive German air fleet delivered disproportionately light damage. Cowes never forgot the Polish ship they constructed, that years later became their savior. Commemorations still occur today to thank the Polish Navy for their aid in the seaport’s darkest hour.

Night of May 4, 1942: the Polish destroyer ORP Błyskawica defends the British seaport of Cowes from a Luftwaffe attack of 160 bombers during the Baedeker Blitz.

The ORP Błyskawica was in Cowes for refitting at the J. Samuel White shipyard at the time. Before World War II, the destroyer and her sister ship ORP Grom were built there at the request of the 2nd Polish Republic.

Cowes was small, strategically nonessential, and considered unlikely to be the target of such a large attack. The Free French garrison in the area lacked antiaircraft artillery. Yet, the ORP Błyskawica was a modern heavy destroyer. Her 8 4-inch guns were a serious threat to the German bombers, who had to climb high to avoid direct hits. She also laid a smokescreen over the town to further frustrate the accuracy of the bombardiers. The ship’s barrage was so intense, that buckets of water had to be splashed onto the overheating barrels. After the raids passed, the Polish crew landed and aided in recovery efforts.

While 70 people perished in the attack, the massive German air fleet delivered disproportionately light damage. Cowes never forgot the Polish ship they constructed, that years later became their savior. Commemorations still occur today to thank the Polish Navy for their aid in the seaport’s darkest hour.

May 3, 1791: Poland adopts a constitution influenced by the 18th century Enlightenment. The Constitution of May 1791 was...
05/03/2021

May 3, 1791: Poland adopts a constitution influenced by the 18th century Enlightenment. The Constitution of May 1791 was the first constitution in Europe that implemented truly democratic values. It protected serfs from noble abuse, equalized political rights between townsfolk and land owners, and implemented a system of checks and balances.

The Constitution of May 1791 was only implemented for a single year, yet remains an important document in European history. It has stood as a powerful Polish national symbol, even during periods of foreign occupation and political captivity. Constitution Day continues to be one of Poland's most important national holidays 230 years after its original creation.

May 3, 1791: Poland adopts a constitution influenced by the 18th century Enlightenment. The Constitution of May 1791 was the first constitution in Europe that implemented truly democratic values. It protected serfs from noble abuse, equalized political rights between townsfolk and land owners, and implemented a system of checks and balances.

The Constitution of May 1791 was only implemented for a single year, yet remains an important document in European history. It has stood as a powerful Polish national symbol, even during periods of foreign occupation and political captivity. Constitution Day continues to be one of Poland's most important national holidays 230 years after its original creation.

"Thank you to everyone who remembers our heroes, said President Andrzej Duda in the spot published by his chancellery on...
04/30/2021
Remember our heroes: President on 3rd Silesian Uprising outbreak centenary

"Thank you to everyone who remembers our heroes, said President Andrzej Duda in the spot published by his chancellery on the occasion of the centenary of the outbreak of the Third Silesian Uprising. The acclaimed actor from Silesia, Franciszek Pieczka, also appeared in the spot.

"Franciszek Pieczka recalled that his father took part in the First Silesian Uprising.

"'The insurgents would say: It does not matter if the coffee is black or bitter, as long as it is Polish! The memory is very important, especially about the Silesian Uprisings, about the commitment of the Silesians to their homeland,' the actor said.

"The 3rd Silesian Uprising was the last of the three armed uprisings of the Polish population in Silesia. The beginning of the uprising was preceded by a plebiscite that took place on March 20, 1921. A minority voted for Silesia to be a part of Poland - 40.3 percent, thus the Plebiscite Committee decided to allocate almost the entire area to Germany."

Read the full story about the 3rd Silesian Uprising here:
https://polandin.com/53581293/remember-our-heroes-president-on-3rd-silesian-uprising-outbreak-centenary

The 3rd Silesian Uprising was the last of the three armed uprisings of the Polish population in Silesia.

Author of the bestselling book "The Volunteer: The True Story of the Resistance Hero who Infiltrated" Jack Fairweather i...
04/29/2021
Witold Pilecki: Auschwitz Volunteer Who Warned The World

Author of the bestselling book "The Volunteer: The True Story of the Resistance Hero who Infiltrated" Jack Fairweather is going to be speaking with Director of the Pilecki Institute Dr Wojciech Kozłowski on May 25 in a free webinar. They will be discussing the life of Captain Pilecki and the historiography surrounding his incredible story. This sounds like a great event, so anyone interested should not hesitate to tune in!

Check out the event here:
https://www.jw3.org.uk/whats-on/witold-pilecki-auschwitz-volunteer-who-warned-world#

Captain Witold Pilecki's firsthand report of his undercover mission to infiltrate the German concentration camp at Auschwitz during World War II is still available in print as our book "The Auschwitz Volunteer: Beyond Bravery", which you can check out here:
https://www.amazon.com/Auschwitz-Volunteer-Beyond-Bravery/dp/1607720108/

Also, you can learn more about the Pilecki Institute at their website here:
https://instytutpileckiego.pl/en/instytut?setlang=true

In 1940, Witold Pilecki, a Polish Army officer and member of the Polish underground resistance, volunteered to be captured by the Gestapo.

"A history buff and treasure hunter has made a 'once in a decade' find after he unearthed a sword, its scabbard and a kn...
04/28/2021
History buff makes ‘once in a decade’ find with Battle of Grunwald sword discovery

"A history buff and treasure hunter has made a 'once in a decade' find after he unearthed a sword, its scabbard and a knight's belt with two knives attached to it, which probably date back to the historic 1410 Battle of Grunwald.

"After finding the weapons near the north-eastern town of Olsztyn, Aleksander Miedwiedew gave his discovery to the regional governor, who in turn transferred it to the Battle of Grunwald Museum.

"The Office of the Warminsko-Mazurskie Province Governor told PAP on Thursday that 'such a find happens once in a decade.'

"Speaking about his find, Miedwiedew said: 'It's a phenomenal set in the form of a sword, scabbard, belt and two knives.'"

Read more about this amazing discovery at the First News:
https://www.thefirstnews.com/article/history-buff-makes-once-in-a-decade-find-with-battle-of-grunwald-sword-discovery-21441

A history buff and treasure hunter has made a “once in a decade” find after he unearthed a sword, its scabbard and a knight's belt with two knives attached to it, which probably date back to the historic 1410 Battle of Grunwald.

April 26/27, 1943: Witold Pilecki, Edward Ciesielski and Jan Redzej successfully escape from the Auschwitz Concentration...
04/27/2021

April 26/27, 1943: Witold Pilecki, Edward Ciesielski and Jan Redzej successfully escape from the Auschwitz Concentration Camp. Here is an excerpt from Pilecki's comprehensive report on the camp:

"On the morning of the 13th of April I went to the cellar in Block 17, where Captain 159 [Stanisław Machowski] (from HQ in Warsaw) was working in a separate little room. I knew him by sight; he had been pointed out to me several times by Second Lieutenant Stasiek 156 [Stanisław Wierzbicki] (who had been shot) and Major 85 [Zygmunt Bohdanowski], but I had not yet spoken to him, for he had been put in the care of our member 138 [name unknown], and we spoke for the first time.

"I told him: 'I have been inside for two years and seven months. I have had a job to do here. Lately I have had no instructions. Now the Germans have shipped out our best people with whom I’ve been working. I would have to start from scratch. I can see no further point in staying here. Therefore, I’m going to leave.'

"Captain 159 [Stanisław Machowski] looked at me in some surprise and said: 'Yes. I can see that, but can one pick and choose when one wants to come to Auschwitz and when one wants to leave?' I replied: 'One can.'

"From that moment on all my energies were directed at finding the best way to escape."

Check out Captain Pilecki's full report on his time in Auschwitz, published as our book "The Auschwitz Volunteer: Beyond Bravery" here:
https://www.amazon.com/Auschwitz-Volunteer-Beyond-Bravery/dp/1607720108/

April 26/27, 1943: Witold Pilecki, Edward Ciesielski and Jan Redzej successfully escape from the Auschwitz Concentration Camp. Here is an excerpt from Pilecki's comprehensive report on the camp:

"On the morning of the 13th of April I went to the cellar in Block 17, where Captain 159 [Stanisław Machowski] (from HQ in Warsaw) was working in a separate little room. I knew him by sight; he had been pointed out to me several times by Second Lieutenant Stasiek 156 [Stanisław Wierzbicki] (who had been shot) and Major 85 [Zygmunt Bohdanowski], but I had not yet spoken to him, for he had been put in the care of our member 138 [name unknown], and we spoke for the first time.

"I told him: 'I have been inside for two years and seven months. I have had a job to do here. Lately I have had no instructions. Now the Germans have shipped out our best people with whom I’ve been working. I would have to start from scratch. I can see no further point in staying here. Therefore, I’m going to leave.'

"Captain 159 [Stanisław Machowski] looked at me in some surprise and said: 'Yes. I can see that, but can one pick and choose when one wants to come to Auschwitz and when one wants to leave?' I replied: 'One can.'

"From that moment on all my energies were directed at finding the best way to escape."

Check out Captain Pilecki's full report on his time in Auschwitz, published as our book "The Auschwitz Volunteer: Beyond Bravery" here:
https://www.amazon.com/Auschwitz-Volunteer-Beyond-Bravery/dp/1607720108/

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