Dana Cama Photography

Dana Cama Photography Dana Cama is a travel and wildlife photographer based in Los Angeles, California. Her photographic stories serve to bridge the gap between science and the public by invoking an emotional response through intimate imagery.

Operating as usual

Artwork & visuals by me, for “O-Six”, a single by @olynmusic released today-, for his album that comes out this Friday. ...
03/29/2021

Artwork & visuals by me, for “O-Six”, a single by @olynmusic released today-, for his album that comes out this Friday. To listen: https://spoti.fi/2O4tHD7
I had fun using my wildlife work for this project. This song came about when I asked Pat to make a short song for me to go with a wolf clip I shot. I have been feeling a lot of ways about the wolf hunting legislation happening in the US lately. In the early 2000’s, O-Six was an alpha female famous for showing herself to visitors in Yellowstone. She was killed by hunters just outside of park border protection, and caused a slew of debate about hunting in the area. I was lucky enough to meet O-Six’s daughter a few years back on assignment. A few months later, she was killed too. We can talk about morals, the right to hunt, rancher conflict and so on, but when it comes to predator hunting, there’s one thing for sure- it’s for sport. Wolves are a keystone species. They are responsible for maintaining Yellowstone’s grazing animal populations, thus preserving the ecosystem. We saw what the region looked like without wolves. We brought them back and they healed the land. Still, in January wolves were removed from the federal endangered species list, which opened the floodgates for states to push hunting again. This month Montana Senate Republicans approved two bills aimed at increasing the hunting and trapping of wolves with private payments to hunters. We’ve looked at science and proved the worth of the living wolf. We’ve figured out resolutions to avoid conflict with ranchers, yet we’re still losing the fight for wolf protections. If I’ve learned one thing in my work, it’s that nature has the incredible capability to heal itself if we allow it to. I encourage you to listen to this song while signing a letter to Gov Gianforte ( https://bit.ly/3svky5w ) that says NO to HB-367/ a bill intended to allow trappers to snare wolves, extend wolf trapping season, place a bounty on wolves, and allow every individual with a wolf hunting or trapping license to kill an unlimited number of wolves, allow the use of bait while hunting or trapping wolves, and so on.

Artwork & visuals by me, for “O-Six”, a single by @olynmusic released today-, for his album that comes out this Friday. To listen: https://spoti.fi/2O4tHD7
I had fun using my wildlife work for this project. This song came about when I asked Pat to make a short song for me to go with a wolf clip I shot. I have been feeling a lot of ways about the wolf hunting legislation happening in the US lately. In the early 2000’s, O-Six was an alpha female famous for showing herself to visitors in Yellowstone. She was killed by hunters just outside of park border protection, and caused a slew of debate about hunting in the area. I was lucky enough to meet O-Six’s daughter a few years back on assignment. A few months later, she was killed too. We can talk about morals, the right to hunt, rancher conflict and so on, but when it comes to predator hunting, there’s one thing for sure- it’s for sport. Wolves are a keystone species. They are responsible for maintaining Yellowstone’s grazing animal populations, thus preserving the ecosystem. We saw what the region looked like without wolves. We brought them back and they healed the land. Still, in January wolves were removed from the federal endangered species list, which opened the floodgates for states to push hunting again. This month Montana Senate Republicans approved two bills aimed at increasing the hunting and trapping of wolves with private payments to hunters. We’ve looked at science and proved the worth of the living wolf. We’ve figured out resolutions to avoid conflict with ranchers, yet we’re still losing the fight for wolf protections. If I’ve learned one thing in my work, it’s that nature has the incredible capability to heal itself if we allow it to. I encourage you to listen to this song while signing a letter to Gov Gianforte ( https://bit.ly/3svky5w ) that says NO to HB-367/ a bill intended to allow trappers to snare wolves, extend wolf trapping season, place a bounty on wolves, and allow every individual with a wolf hunting or trapping license to kill an unlimited number of wolves, allow the use of bait while hunting or trapping wolves, and so on.

03/22/2021

Going through some videos for a collab with @olynmusic (who’s releasing a record next week). Audio is from a song called O-Six, about the tragic end of a famous wolf, killed just outside of Yellowstone’s borders. O-Six’s death stirred a great debate about the hunting and protection of wolves in Wyoming, Montana and Idaho.

Vaccine news got me feeling like the end of hibernation is in sight.
03/12/2021

Vaccine news got me feeling like the end of hibernation is in sight.

Vaccine news got me feeling like the end of hibernation is in sight.

Portraits of a place I don’t remember.
03/11/2021

Portraits of a place I don’t remember.

Sometimes I feel smaller than a ground squirrel. I like feeling small. I look at these squirrels in this vast wild park,...
10/07/2020

Sometimes I feel smaller than a ground squirrel. I like feeling small. I look at these squirrels in this vast wild park, and relate to their seeming insignificance. Their existence, so common. Their behavior, habitual. People and animals regularly pass them by without a second glance. They forage, groom themselves, and hang out in their dens. I often feel like my little life here is just as insignificant. Is what I say and do each day really valuable to the big picture? Does what I consume and not consume make a difference? Does my vote really matter? The truth is, even in an ecosystem with grand predators like bears and wolves, the ground squirrel is just as important to their ecosystem. Columbian ground squirrels are an important food source for many predators including badgers, weasels, coyotes, foxes, and birds of prey. In their native and undisturbed habitats, ground squirrels provide key benefits to the land. Their burrowing and digging habits increase habitat diversity resulting in complex interdependent plant and animal communities. Their burrowing assists in soil development, soil aeration, and moisture retention. Their habits literally keep the earth in this park healthy. The more time I spend with wildlife, the more I learn about our roles. Every choice, habit…small, significant.

A black bear crosses over the hill as the sun rises in Lamar Valley. My partner & I had so many awesome bear encounters ...
09/23/2020

A black bear crosses over the hill as the sun rises in Lamar Valley. My partner & I had so many awesome bear encounters this summer. I always tell people whom fear wildlife, that animals are far more scared of us than we are of them (even the big ones!). I can’t tell you how many times I’ve spoken with people in the backcountry who had no idea they were in bear territory. Knowing your neighbors is so important! If you’re prepared, respect boundaries (the more distance the better), make yourself known, keep food contained (and carry bear spray as a backup), most bear encounters are great! 90% of the time most wildlife could care less about you and continue on their way, just as this bear did.

Despite how common it is to see bison in Yellowstone, some of my favorite wildlife experiences are with these massive an...
09/21/2020

Despite how common it is to see bison
in Yellowstone, some of my favorite wildlife experiences are with these massive animals. There’s something extra special about the bison here. Yellowstone is the only place in the U.S. where bison have continued to live since prehistoric times. They are pure descendants (free of cattle genes) of early bison that roamed our country’s grasslands. On this morning, just as the sun started to break through the thick fog in Hayden Valley, I stood at the riverbank to look through my binoculars at the hills above. I heard a huff and puff and suddenly a bison emerged from the fog, crossing the river towards us. What a treat to see one swim...but I most definitely did not stick around to watch it get out 🙃

First light
09/18/2020

First light

As I stand here, wearing a respirator mask just to take my dogs out in the yard, the sky is orange and raining ash. 14 m...
09/15/2020

As I stand here, wearing a respirator mask just to take my dogs out in the yard, the sky is orange and raining ash. 14 miles from my home, 36,000 acres of the Angeles National Forest is on fire, and will likely continue to burn for the next month. Yeah, I'm completely devastated that this sacred green space I've spent almost every day in since I've lived here is gone. But mostly, I’m angry that there are Americans who continue to support leaders who favor the corporations that brought our climate to this. I'm so goddamn tired of thoughts & prayers. Please. Take 5 minutes of your day to do your OWN research on the climate crisis. This is so much more than just forest management. Please. Listen to SCIENCE. Please. Vote out politicians who pull back environmental restrictions on major corporations that are the biggest contributors to pollution and the reason the earth is in a climate emergency. Please vote with your dollar if you can. Vote out politicians who don't make your children's future a priority. This is why the west is burning. I'm looking at our future in the sky right now.

This photo was taken in March, on one of my favorite hikes in the Angeles National Forest💔

Have you ever seen a Mountain Goat climb? If you have, now imagine carrying 20lbs of camera equipment up a cliff, trying...
09/07/2020

Have you ever seen a Mountain Goat climb? If you have, now imagine carrying 20lbs of camera equipment up a cliff, trying to keep up with them while simultaneously being as quiet and non-invasive as possible. The things I would do to have their Spider-Man like abilities... People always say how lucky I am to capture so much wildlife. I am, but the truth is, it’s really a ton of work & preparation (and yes, a lot of luck). It’s researching sightings way ahead of time. It’s getting up at 4am every day, driving, hiking, waiting, for hours to see nothing 80% of the time. It’s staying in one spot silently, and hearing later on about a sighting just a half mile away. It’s making sure to be a ghost in the bush. To be non-invasive means sometimes you can’t get the shot you’ve been working so hard to capture, because it would potentially disturb the animals. When you’re lucky enough to have an encounter, the rush is addictive. Even if you don’t get the shot, watching wildlife doing their thing, so quietly and gracefully is pure magic in a world full of chaos. I hope you all get to experience it. Maybe when the pandemic is over, you can join me💚

Housekeeping.
09/04/2020

Housekeeping.

07/11/2020

Dawn chorus in the Tetons.

Audio by @olynmusic

07/04/2020

“We have doomed the wolf not for what it is, but for what we deliberately and mistakenly perceive it to be — the mythologized epitome of a savage ruthless killer— which is, in reality, no more than a reflected image of ourself.”

— Farley Mowat

Thanks @olynmusic for the music.

When the landscape does the work. Rocky Mountains, CO.
01/18/2020

When the landscape does the work. Rocky Mountains, CO.

#2020 North American Wildlife Calendar is back in stock. All net proceeds will now be donated to @nswrfs, fighting the 1...
01/04/2020

#2020 North American Wildlife Calendar is back in stock. All net proceeds will now be donated to @nswrfs, fighting the 12 million acres of Bushfire in Australia happening right now. It’s only $35 and you’re contributing to help save Australia’s wildlife during one of climate change’s most devastating blows to date.
Here to Purchase >>>bit.ly/2ubk4bp

#Australia #austrailiafires #seeaustrailia #earthcapture #bushfiresaustrailia #austrailianfires #fireaustrailia #austrailianbushfires #nswfires #bushfires #austrailiaisburning #climatechange #wildlifeconservation @ Australia

Rutting season.
12/19/2019

Rutting season.

Hi, my 2020 Wildlife Calendar is out. Gift it to your favorite fellow nature nerd or... yourself. 10% of proceeds donate...
11/20/2019

Hi, my 2020 Wildlife Calendar is out. Gift it to your favorite fellow nature nerd or... yourself. 10% of proceeds donated to World Wildlife Fund.
>>> https://bit.ly/2OxM9jI

Everyone has heard the phrase, “where the buffalo roam.” But there haven’t always been vast-roaming herds here in North ...
10/03/2019

Everyone has heard the phrase, “where the buffalo roam.” But there haven’t always been vast-roaming herds here in North America. About 150 years ago, nearly 30 million bison roamed the Great Plains. A mass slaughter began in the early 1800s, leaving fewer than 1,000 in the wild. Today, bison are considered ecologically extinct- with most of the population in captivity (either preserves like this one or meat ranches). Bison are a keystone species, and SO important for Prarie ecosystems to thrive. The Bison placed here in Rocky Mountain Arsenal are literally bringing the prairie back to life. I’ll share the details of how at a later date.

10% of proceeds from this print will be donated to @defendersofwildlife >>> https://bit.ly/2njzrLV

An except from a 1948 issue of Nature Magazine I picked up last week: "It is frequently urged upon us nowadays that we a...
09/30/2019

An except from a 1948 issue of Nature Magazine I picked up last week: "It is frequently urged upon us nowadays that we adopt a concept described by the phrase "One World". The idea summed up is this: All the peoples of this earth are a unitary whole- the entity of the human race- and that for the solution of our difficulties we must abolish the false & arbitrary divisions within this whole and must act together with a sense of the reality of that common brotherhood, which does, in fact, contain and link us all...The idea of One World must be adopted, certainly. But I should like to plead for recognition of our membership in an even greater community. I should like to plead that the wholeness of our One World be seen as a larger wholeness, a more encompassing and unitary brotherhood, including not only the peoples and nations, but including our brotherly birds & beasts, our trees, soil, and sky. All the created world, in all its parts & entirety, is a united whole. All creatures in it are in a common brotherhood. Everything, as the philosophers used to say, is interconnected with everything else. Not only is there a basic brotherhood between a man in England & a man in America.... but there is a bond between a man & a mouse, a tree & a fox, a frog & a raccoon. We are all participants together in the united entirety... We are all the creatures of the one parental and primary source of all beginning, whether we may like to call it something scientific like the Life-Force, or whether we may like to employ language of religious utterance & use the name of Almighty God... All creatures...are brotherly components in the whole of Nature. We share a grandfather, so to speak, with owls, & with the striped dace that swims in the creek. We have a family link with the oak tree that towers on the hill...This is the One World, I think, of which we need to make acknowledgement... We need to reawaken our realization. We need to rekindle our sense of the community of all that is created. We need to restore ourselves to the brotherhood of that One World which has brought forth alike birds and beasts, trees and soils, waters and planets, and... our selves.”
Print>>> https://bit.ly/2msnaEA
10% of proceeds from this print will be donated to Rocky Mountain Wolf Project, - a non-profit aiming to improve public understanding of gray wolf behavior, ecology, and options for re-establishing the species in Colorado.

Keepers of the dead. My favorite part of living in Los Angeles is how much wildlife exists in the city. Many of us frequ...
08/15/2019

Keepers of the dead. My favorite part of living in Los Angeles is how much wildlife exists in the city. Many of us frequently see Coyotes at night…but where do they spend their days? My friend came across a pack living in a cemetery just a few miles from his house. We spent the morning watching them catch Fig Beetles and roll around in the shade of trees and gravestones. I was amazed at how comfortable they were. The old cemetery seemed to have hardly any visitors, and the groundskeepers paid no mind to the wild predators only yards away from their work. When a coyote stares at you, it feels like forever. It’s easy to get lost in their yellow eyes. Something about having that moment in an old graveyard is exceptionally magical. In some American Indian traditions, you were looking at THE coyote spirit if you saw one in a graveyard. It’s said that the Coyote is mourning his lost wife. As a trickster, the Coyote saved man from the mouth of the Raven, and the Raven took the Coyote’s wife in retaliation.

Color and Black & White versions of this print are for sale in my print shop >>> https://bit.ly/2HlyLg3

**10% of proceeds will be donated to Citizens for Los Angeles Wildlife CLAW**

Sometimes you have to pull over on a long drive and take a nap. Sometimes you wake up to a herd of Rocky Mountain bighor...
08/01/2019

Sometimes you have to pull over on a long drive and take a nap. Sometimes you wake up to a herd of Rocky Mountain bighorn sheep surrounding your car. I got to spend some time with this lady and her herd as she used my car as a barricade to protect herself from approaching tourists (stay inside your cars around wild animals please!). Since I moved to the west coast, I've constantly been on the lookout for Bighorns. There are three subspecies which occupy separate areas in North America- the Rocky Mountain, Sierra Nevada, and desert bighorn sheep. They are relatives of goats, and have split hooves with rough bottoms for a natural grip that helps them move easily about rugged mountain terrains. Thanks to their impeccable balance, bighorn sheep can stand on ledges as small as 2 inches wide and can jump from ledge to ledge over spans as wide as 20 feet.

A lot of people messaged me asking if the white bear in my post last week was a polar bear, so I wanted to give an updat...
06/21/2019

A lot of people messaged me asking if the white bear in my post last week was a polar bear, so I wanted to give an update! The little lady on the left is actually a white phase-black bear(her mom is in the middle). Just like dogs, black bear cubs can be dark brown, black, cinnamon, white, etc. despite their mom’s coloring. Though white cubs are rare, she’s not albino! This print is now for sale in my new (under construction, but functioning) print shop (https://bit.ly/2N0wGv8) 10% of proceeds from this print will be donated to @biosphere_institute - a non-profit promoting human-wildlife coexistence and local action on climate change in the Bow Valley Community.

Address

Los Angeles, CA
90042

Products

Prints

Alerts

Be the first to know and let us send you an email when Dana Cama Photography posts news and promotions. Your email address will not be used for any other purpose, and you can unsubscribe at any time.

Contact The Business

Send a message to Dana Cama Photography:

Videos

Category

Conservation & Coexistence

Dana Cama is a travel and wildlife photographer based in Los Angeles, California. Her photographic stories serve to bridge the gap between science and the public by invoking an emotional response through intimate imagery. Dana’s work strives to connect people with the beauty and wonder that still exists in nature, while shedding light on the threats it faces.

Nearby media companies