Washington Heights NYC

Washington Heights NYC Washington Heights NYC is a leading news portal where you will get news about Washington DC and New York City.

02/04/2019
www.washingtonheights-nyc.com

Overlooking the Harlem River there was an amusement park that Washington Heights and Inwood called its own. The Fort George Amusement Park was opened in 1895 and was located in what is now the northernmost end of Highbridge Park, between 190th and 192nd Streets at Amsterdam Avenue. Like all other amusement parks, Fort George was at the terminus of a trolley line, specifically the Third Avenue line, which connected to various parts of Manhattan and the Bronx. [ 803 more words ]
http://www.washingtonheights-nyc.com/fort-george-amusement-park/

02/04/2019
www.washingtonheights-nyc.com

The Highbridge Pool and Recreation Center were built in 1936. The pool was the fifth of eleven city pools built with labor supplied by President Franklin D. Roosevelt’s Works Progress Administration (WPA). It opened during the hot summer of 1936, leading Fortune magazine to dub 1936 “the swimming pool year.” An avid swimmer since his college days as a freestyler at Yale, Parks Commissioner Robert Moses (1888-1981, Parks Commissioner 1934-60) created many facilities that increased public access to New York’s water resources. [ 481 more words ]
http://www.washingtonheights-nyc.com/highbridge-pool-and-recreation-center/

02/04/2019
www.washingtonheights-nyc.com

Highbridge Park derives its name from New York City’s oldest standing bridge, the High Bridge (1848), which was built to carry the Old Croton Aqueduct over the Harlem River. From the 17th to the 19th centuries, the area was sparsely populated with scattered farms and private estates. During the American Revolution, the Battle of Fort Washington took place in the vicinity. [ 984 more words ]
http://www.washingtonheights-nyc.com/highbridge-park/

02/04/2019
www.washingtonheights-nyc.com

The Hudson-Fulton Celebration was organized to commemorate two events in 1909. First was the Tri-Centennial of Henry Hudson’s voyage up the river that bears his name and the maiden voyage of the Claremont in 1807. Scientific American Magazine had published a design for the proposed bridge in 1906. A bridge was to have been constructed and opened in 1909 and would connect Manhattan and the Bronx at… [ 855 more words ]
http://www.washingtonheights-nyc.com/henry-hudson-memorial-bridge/

02/04/2019
www.washingtonheights-nyc.com

One of the parks in Washington Heights that is little known for its enjoyment and view of the George Washington Bridge is bordered by Haven Avenue, Cabrini Boulevard, 177th Street and 178th Street. Many motorists pass it daily on the off-ramp from the bridge or pass it by when they have to use the Henry Hudson Parkway from 177th Street. What is even less known is the fact that at one time there used to be a restaurant there, and its historical significance to the area. [ 463 more words ]
http://www.washingtonheights-nyc.com/arrowhead-inn/

02/04/2019
www.washingtonheights-nyc.com

The Spuyten Duyvil Swing Bridge tells an interesting story that intertwines the history of New York City with the Hudson River Valley. The New York & Hudson River Railroad was incorporated on May 6, 1847, to connect New York City with New York State. The original stock subscription for the company was 30,165 shares amounting to $3,016,500. There was also an initial cost of $9,000,000 for construction. [ 1,042 more word ]
http://www.washingtonheights-nyc.com/spuyten-duyvil-swing-bridge/

02/04/2019
www.washingtonheights-nyc.com

Marble Hill holds the singular geographic distinction of having been a part of Manhattan, an island unto its own, and a part of the mainland. The neighborhood lies on a rock precipice in the Bronx that is bounded by West 230th Street, Exterior Street, Johnson Avenue, and the Harlem River. Originally, Marble Hill physically belonged to the Manhattan Island, separated from the Bronx by… [ 324 more words ]
http://www.washingtonheights-nyc.com/marble-hill-playground/

02/04/2019
www.washingtonheights-nyc.com

For nine generations of worshipers, Saint Stephen’s United Methodist Church has been a fixture of the Marble Hill, Kingsbridge, Spuyten Duyvil and Riverdale sections of the Bronx. This congregation came into existence in 1825 and was incorporated a decade later, making it one of the earliest religious institutions in the area. The group was known as the Moshulu Methodists. [ 278 more words ]
http://www.washingtonheights-nyc.com/saint-stephens-church/

02/04/2019
www.washingtonheights-nyc.com

In the summer of 1776 the Continental troops were fortifying northern Manhattan and the Bronx for a siege from the Royalist Forces. A series of eight forts in the Bronx, and Fort Washington with its defensive works in Manhattan, were hastily constructed for this purpose. One of these small outposts was on Marble Hill near what is now 227th Street and Van Corlear Place. [ 295 more words ]
http://www.washingtonheights-nyc.com/fort-prince-charles/

02/04/2019
www.washingtonheights-nyc.com

New York City sits atop a foundation composed of five distinct layers of bedrock: Fordham gneiss, found primarily in the Bronx; Manhattan schist, in Lower and northern Manhattan; the Hartland Formation, in central Manhattan, the Bronx, Brooklyn, and Queens; Staten Island serpentinite, in Staten Island; and Inwood marble, in Manhattan and beneath the rivers that surround it. Of these layers, Inwood marble is perhaps the most aesthetically distinctive with its pure, crystalline white appearance. [ 272 more words ]
http://www.washingtonheights-nyc.com/inwood-marble-in-isham-park/

02/04/2019
www.washingtonheights-nyc.com

The Marble Hill community in the Bronx is the only part of Manhattan connected to the mainland, due to a little-known quirk of geography. Originally, this 42-acre enclave was the northernmost section of the borough of Manhattan and was surrounded by the winding Spuyten Duyvil Creek. In 1895 the course of the Spuyten Duyvil Creek was changed to improve navigation around Manhattan, thus physically separating Marble Hill from Manhattan. [ 1,384 more word ]
http://www.washingtonheights-nyc.com/marble-hill/

02/04/2019
www.washingtonheights-nyc.com

Washington Heights, Inwood, and Marble Hill share a common bond. In 1895, the Spuyten Duyvil Creek had been rerouted from 230th Street to 225th Street for improved navigability. A bridge that had connected Inwood and Marble Hill has never been so intertwined in the history of the communities. This bridge created a common bond that connected Manhattan Island to its landlocked and forlorn neighborhood that is now connected to the Bronx. [ 526 more words ]
http://www.washingtonheights-nyc.com/broadway-bridge/

02/04/2019
www.washingtonheights-nyc.com

One of the earliest taverns in Washington Heights was the Blue Bell Tavern. It was built between 1725 and 1730 on what is now the northwest corner of 181st Street and Broadway. Taverns like the Blue Bell had many uses. There were concerts or puppet shows in the gardens during the summer. It was also a center for gossip, socializing, arguing over politics and doing business. [ 396 more words ]
http://www.washingtonheights-nyc.com/blue-bell-tavern/

02/04/2019
www.washingtonheights-nyc.com

On the northwest corner of 181st Street and Broadway, the RKO Coliseum boasted to be the third largest theater in the United States, with 3,500 seats, when it opened in 1920. B.S. Moss was involved with the launching of the theater as an entity. The architects were DeRosa and Periera, who designed other movie palaces of that period. Historically the site of the Coliseum was occupied by the… [ 392 more words ]
http://www.washingtonheights-nyc.com/rko-coliseum-theater/

02/04/2019
www.washingtonheights-nyc.com

In 1930, the Loew’s 175th at 4140 Broadway opened its doors to the public. This theater culminated the RKO Coliseum’s (located at 181st Street and Broadway) brag of being the third largest in America with an added 100 seats with a capacity of 3,600 seats. This Loew’s 175th was part of a movie theater chain founded by Marcus Loew (1870-1927). In 1912 Loew owned 400 cinemas in the United States. [ 442 more words ]
http://www.washingtonheights-nyc.com/loews-175th-theater/

02/04/2019
www.washingtonheights-nyc.com

The Audubon Ballroom and Theater, located at 3940 Broadway between 165th and 166th Streets, was opened in 1912 by William Fox. The Audubon was one of the first theaters in the Fox theater group for vaudeville and movies to come to Washington Heights and Inwood. Wilhelm Fried, a Hungarian-born immigrant, had changed his name to William Fox and purchased a run-down penny arcade in Brooklyn in 1904. [ 4,210 more words ]
http://www.washingtonheights-nyc.com/audubon-ballroom/

02/04/2019
www.washingtonheights-nyc.com

The only major hospital in the Washington Heights and Inwood communities is the Columbia-Presbyterian Medical Center. The center is bounded by 165th Street, 168th Street, Broadway and Riverside Drive. This hospital was originally known as the Presbyterian Hospital and was located on Park Avenue between 70th and 71st Streets and was founded in 1868 by philanthropist James Lenox. In 1911 the Hospital entered into an agreement with the College of Physicians and Surgeons of Columbia University, which was located on Tenth Avenue and West 59th Street. [ 774 more words ]
http://www.washingtonheights-nyc.com/columbia-presbyterian-medical-center/

02/04/2019
www.washingtonheights-nyc.com

The Harlem River Drive takes its name from the river it follows. Known as Muscoota to the American Indians, the Harlem River runs roughly eight miles from the Hudson River to Long Island Sound. In 1895, the Army Corps of Engineers constructed the Harlem Ship Canal to ease shipping around Manhattan. Its construction separated Northern Manhattan from the Bronx. The Drive originated as the Harlem River Speedway, which, in its heyday, attracted leisure lovers from all over the country. [ 469 more words ]
http://www.washingtonheights-nyc.com/harlem-river-drive/

02/04/2019
www.washingtonheights-nyc.com

One of the most frequently used transit systems that has not been seen in over half a century were the trolley cars of New York City. These trolleys connected Washington Heights and Inwood with lower Manhattan, the Bronx and parts of lower Westchester County. Trolley service started as horse-drawn cars in the 1850s. Many of these lines were small and slow. [ 1,802 more word ]
http://www.washingtonheights-nyc.com/trolleys-of-washington-heights-and-inwood/

02/04/2019
www.washingtonheights-nyc.com

For over a century, baseball fans have followed one team that has become an icon of American sports. In its first twenty seasons as a team, the New York Yankees did not win a league championship and finished second only twice. Since then, the Yankees have dominated the World Series by winning 26 championships. The Yankees began as the Baltimore Orioles in 1901. [ 1,393 more word ]
http://www.washingtonheights-nyc.com/new-york-yankees/

02/04/2019
www.washingtonheights-nyc.com

One of northern Manhattan’s most interesting landmarks is a strip of land bounded by 218th Street, the Spuyten Duyvil Creek, Broadway and Inwood Hill Park — a sports complex owned by Columbia University known as Baker Field. This site is Columbia’s principal outdoor athletic facility, which boasts the fact that it it is the only major complex used for amateur and collegiate sports in New York City. [ 1,246 more word ]
http://www.washingtonheights-nyc.com/baker-field/

02/04/2019
www.washingtonheights-nyc.com

On the banks of the Spuyten Duyvil Creek across from Inwood Hill Park, there was a foundry that was run by three generations of a family that had served the United States in peace time and at war. The Johnson Ironworks Foundry became a familiar site and the mainstay for employment for the residents of Kingsbridge and the Spuyten Duyvil communities of the Bronx. [ 1,976 more word ]
http://www.washingtonheights-nyc.com/johnson-ironworks-factory/

02/04/2019
www.washingtonheights-nyc.com

Date: August 1809 (As told in Knickerbocker’s History of New York, by Washington Irving, 1809.) It was a dark and stormy night when the good Antony arrived at the creek (sagely denominated Haerlem river) which separates the island of Manna-hata from the mainland. The wind was high, the elements were in an uproar, and no Charon could be found to ferry the adventurous sounder of brass across the water. [ 317 more words ]
http://www.washingtonheights-nyc.com/anthony-van-corlears-crossing-of-the-spuyten-duyvil/

02/04/2019
www.washingtonheights-nyc.com

For three centuries ferries have crossed the Hudson River, Spuyten Duyvil Creek and Harlem River with great frequency. They have been the backbone of commerce and movement of people to and from this part of Manhattan to other parts of the New York Metropolitan Area. The first ferries consisted of canoes, row boats, rafts and flat-bottomed scows. There were seasonal hours: In the summer the hours were 5 a.m. [ 980 more words ]
http://www.washingtonheights-nyc.com/ferries-of-northern-manhattan/

02/04/2019
www.washingtonheights-nyc.com

The history of the Spuyten Duyvil Creek and the Harlem River Ship Canal dates back to the pre-colonial period of New York City. It has a rich history that encompasses the immediate area it serves. Inwood Hill Park was known as “shorakapkok,” which is translated as “the sitting down place. The Mohican “showaukuppock” translated as “cove.” The Delaware Indians called it “w’shakuppek” which was “smooth still water” when interpreted from their language. [ 1,687 more word ]
http://www.washingtonheights-nyc.com/spuyten-duyvil-creek-and-the-harlem-river-ship-canal/

02/04/2019
www.washingtonheights-nyc.com

Isham Park, located on Broadway between 211th Street and Isham Street, north to 218th Street, was part of a 24-acre estate purchased in 1864 by William Bradley Isham, a leather merchant who resided there until his death. Prior to this he and his wife had lived at various locations in lower Manhattan, such as at 19th Street, Fifth Avenue between 14th and 15th Streets, and Madison Avenue and 30th Street. [ 720 more words ]
http://www.washingtonheights-nyc.com/isham-park/

02/04/2019
www.washingtonheights-nyc.com

Reginald Pelham Bolton is considered the foremost authority on the history of Washington Heights and Inwood. Born in London, England, on October 5, 1856, Bolton was the son of James and Lydia Louise Pym Bolton. He majored as a consulting civil engineer. In 1878 Reginald married Ethelind Huyck in Sussex. They had two children: Guy and Ivy. The Boltons moved to the United States and settled in Washington Heights at what is now 638 West 158th Street. [ 1,534 more word ]
http://www.washingtonheights-nyc.com/reginald-pelham-bolton/

02/04/2019
www.washingtonheights-nyc.com

Northern Manhattan and the area surrounding it is rich in a culture that has not been seen in almost 500 years. The Native Americans lived and traded in this area long before the arrival and colonization of the European settlers. The Lenape Indians, known as the Delaware Confederacy, is one of the non-migratory groups of the Algonquin Nation that lived in what is now northern Delaware, all of New Jersey, eastern Pennsylvania, southern New York, and southwest Connecticut. [ 1,605 more word ]
http://www.washingtonheights-nyc.com/native-american-life-in-washington-heights-and-inwood/

02/04/2019
www.washingtonheights-nyc.com

Salt marshes play a critical role in the support of human life, acting as natural filtration systems by trapping pollutants that would otherwise contaminate our bays and oceans. Salt marshes have the ability to absorb fertilizers, improve water quality, and reduce erosion. They are also among the richest wildlife habitats. Inwood Hill Park, a 196-acre oasis at the northern tip of Manhattan, features the last remnant of the tidal marshes that once surrounded Manhattan Island. [ 612 more words ]
http://www.washingtonheights-nyc.com/salt-marsh-in-inwood-hill-park/

02/04/2019
www.washingtonheights-nyc.com

Inwood Hill Park contains the last natural forest and salt marsh in Manhattan. It is unclear how the park received its present name. Before becoming parkland in 1916, it was known during the Colonial and post-Revolutionary War period as Cock or Cox Hill. The name could be a variant of the Native American name for the area, Shorakapok, meaning either “the wading place,” “the edge of the river,” or “the place between the ridges.” [ 452 more words ]
http://www.washingtonheights-nyc.com/inwood-hill-park/

Address

3525 Heavner Court
Manhattan, NY
10016

Alerts

Be the first to know and let us send you an email when Washington Heights NYC posts news and promotions. Your email address will not be used for any other purpose, and you can unsubscribe at any time.

Nearby media companies


Other Media/News Companies in Manhattan

Show All