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Andrey Platonov’s Chevengur, translated from the Russian and the authoritative text by Robert and Elizabeth Chandler, ca...
01/04/2024

Andrey Platonov’s Chevengur, translated from the Russian and the authoritative text by Robert and Elizabeth Chandler, came out this week.

The revolution has come. Civil War has raged and ended. Famine has killed and affected millions. Now communism can truly flourish. But where will it take place?

Sasha Dvanov crosses the wide steppes looking for the true form of socialism and a better and more equal community. Joining forces with the noble warrior, Stephan Kopiokin, Sasha hears about a village where the landowners and bourgeoisie are gone, and where a new world, without work, is coming into being: Chevengur.

Comic, ironic, grotesque, radical, Platonov’s novel is a masterpiece of Soviet culture (even though it wasn’t published in the USSR) and on par with its model, Don Quixote.

Three new books coming in late January and February.
12/28/2023

Three new books coming in late January and February.

“Half-dressed, he took out of the cupboard, from between two shirts, a pretty little case in which the syringe had been ...
12/05/2023

“Half-dressed, he took out of the cupboard, from between two shirts, a pretty little case in which the syringe had been sleeping for several weeks. He turned it in his fingers for a minute or two. He put it back, afraid. Just now he had desperately committed himself to his inclination, though he was quite sure where this final relapse would lead. He got his revolved from the trunk, and placed it besides the syringe. The two belonged together.”

Alain is a dandy, a handsome man (though his looks are going), and a he**in addict, who depends on wealthy women to fund his drug habit. One night, in the midst of a clean spell at a sanatorium, Alain comes into a generous sum of money. He heads to Paris, where, over the course of a long cold evening, he visits a host of friends and acquaintances, searching among them for someone, anyone, who can offer him an example of a life truly worth living. He finds none.

Pierre Drieu la Rochelle is one of the most controversial and contradictory figures of twentieth-century French literature. He drifted in and out of every major political and artistic current of his time but swore allegiance to none. The Fire Within, translated into English by Richard Howard and back in print as of today, is based on the life of his friend, the Dadaist Jacques Rigaut, who committed su***de in 1929. As late as 1933, Drieu was a vocal critic of anti-Semitism and fascism, but in 1934, after a trip to Berlin, he began to promote what he called “fascist socialism,” and was an infamous collaborator during the German Occupation of France. At the end of the war, hiding at the house of his friend André Malraux, he committed su***de.

Politically compromised as Drieu came to be, there is no doubt that The Fire Within remains a startlingly perceptive and empathetic portrayal of addiction and ontological despair. As Will Self writes, “like Burroughs’s J***y, The Fire Within is an existential novel that stands with Sartre’s Nausea and Camus’s The Fall as one the great summations of the human soul under the alienating conditions of twentieth-century capitalist society.”

Out now from , Cataract assembles reflections & observations by the late, great artist & writer John Berger after having...
11/29/2023

Out now from , Cataract assembles reflections & observations by the late, great artist & writer John Berger after having cataract surgery—first on his left eye and then on his right. Accompanied by whimsical drawings from illustrator Selçuk Demirel, Berger writes with characteristic acuity about the changes in his perception after his vision is cleared: “The removal of cataracts is comparable with the removal of a particular form of forgetfulness. Your eyes begin to re-remember first times. And it is in this sense that what they experience after the intervention resembles a kind of visual renaissance.” This is the third collaboration between Demirel and Berger published by Notting Hill Editions: Also available are Smoke, a prose poem on the cultural implications of smoking, and What Time Is It?, a meditation about the illusory nature of time.

Our reissue of M. K. Brown’s brilliant Let’s Go Swimming with Mr. Sillypants went on sale this week! Brown was a major c...
11/17/2023

Our reissue of M. K. Brown’s brilliant Let’s Go Swimming with Mr. Sillypants went on sale this week! Brown was a major contributor to National Lampoon in its heyday and wrote and illustrated just a couple of books for children, one of which is this silly, thrilling story. Mr. Sillypants signs up for swim lessons, worries about said swim lessons (what if he steps on a fish?!), makes an epic sandwich, and has a wild dream. Will he be able to face his lesson the next morning? You’ll have to read the book to find out. 🐟🥪

An Ordinary Youth is Walter Kempowski most popular work in Germany and the first in his so-called “German Chronicle.” Lo...
11/15/2023

An Ordinary Youth is Walter Kempowski most popular work in Germany and the first in his so-called “German Chronicle.” Long considered untranslatable, Michael Lipkin’s translation brings into English a book for fans of Günter Grass, Heinrich Böll, Anna Seghers, Uwe Johnson, or Jenny Erpenbeck.

The events of An Ordinary Youth mirror Kempowski’s own childhood. Nine-year-old Walter’s family is moving house when the novel opens, but Walter’s main concerns are his tin soldiers and his older brother’s jazz records. Reported in fragments, with an attention to language that echoes Natalia Ginzburg’s Family Lexicon, Kempowski draws from slang, songs, propaganda, commercials, familial idioms, and dialect to depict Germany (Rostock, specifically) in the 1930s and the war.

The contemporary reader knows how the war ends, but Walter experiences this period as child, unknowing but not fully innocent, always observing. How Kempowski reconstructs his memories and experiences, burdened with the heavy knowledge of war crimes and murder, is a feat of fiction as well as a message to readers from all countries and eras.

“I want Ed’s experience. A portion belongs to me already. It’s hard to ask him to tape our conversations, because it mea...
11/14/2023

“I want Ed’s experience. A portion belongs to me already. It’s hard to ask him to tape our conversations, because it means he is going to die. Am I stealing his memories? They already seem derelict, value withdrawn. We were lovers during our twenties so we grew up together, performing toy versions of our parents’ marriages.”

About Ed is the book Robert Glück has been writing for the past two decades. It’s an achingly tender portrait of the artist Ed Aulerich-Sugai, who Glück met in 1970 in San Francisco; they were lovers for eight years, and then friends. Years later, Ed is diagnosed with AIDS. He dies in 1994. The book is a hybrid, at once fiction and fact, like memory, and it takes in many things: art and writing and family and s*x and death. The book also shifts in register, from the delicate to the analytic, to funny and explicit and heartbroken.

In a recent interview with , Glück states “I had to invent a new kind of tact to write about a friend who’s died.” He incorporated pages from Ed’s dream journal. “I wanted the dreams to track his life, his relationships, and his illness, and to restage his psychic life in the reader’s mind—that is, to turn the reader into a kind of tomb.”

About Ed goes on sale today. Glück will be talking about it at upcoming events: this Friday (7pm) with at the ; on Wednesday, November 29th (7pm) at ; and on Friday, December 1st (6pm) at in New York City.

“Manchette was a decades-long hurricane through the Parisian cultural scene. We must revere him now and rediscover him t...
11/08/2023

“Manchette was a decades-long hurricane through the Parisian cultural scene. We must revere him now and rediscover him this very instant. Jean-Patrick Manchette was Le Homme.” —James Ellroy

Skeletons in the Closet is the last of Jean-Patrick Manchette’s eleven novels to be published into English. Manchette revitalized the crime fiction genre in France with the néo-polar: a genre that infused the hallmarks of a polar (crime novel) with a post-’68 political savviness.

Along with No Room at the Morgue, Skeletons in the Closet is one of Manchette’s two novels starring a private eye: the jaded ex-policeman Eugène Tarpon. In the Tarpon series, Manchette breathes new life into the traditional American pulp formula which he knew so well—a down-and-out detective, an alluring female fatale, and a spiraling crime ring—to construct thrilling tales about alienation and corruption. As always in a Manchette novel, the system is as much the villain as any individual evildoer.

The central mystery in Skeletons in the Closet revolves around the disappearance of an attractive deaf woman, Philippine Pigot. When the assigned police commissioner is taken off the case, Tarpon realizes that a larger conspiracy is at play. N**i collaborators, weak-willed informants, and crooked policemen stand in the way between Tarpon and the truth, which he pursues through hair-raising car chases and vicious fight scenes to its bloody end.

Poet, film maker, novelist, provocateur, Pier Paolo Pasolini sent shockwaves through Italian society. He was brought to ...
11/07/2023

Poet, film maker, novelist, provocateur, Pier Paolo Pasolini sent shockwaves through Italian society. He was brought to trial 33 times and brutally murdered in 1975 in a crime that is still unresolved.

Today we’re thrilled to publish his first novel, Boys Alive, in a new translation by Tim Parks, along with Theorem, which he wrote during the filming of the movie, translated by Stuart Hood and available in the U. S. for the first time.

Boys Alive is saturated in the squalor of Rome following the Second World War. A cast of street hustlers populate its pages, looting, scamming, and stealing their way through streets just as tough as they are. For Pasolini’s young protagonists, the most important thing is to have fun, and so they boast and compete, the desperate uncertainty of their days and nights offset by the fabulous inventiveness of their words.

Sensual, cinematic and deeply allegorical, Theorem is the most enigmatic of Pasolini’s four novels. A beautiful young man appears suddenly at the home of an affluent Milanese industrialist and seduces in turn the maid, the son, the daughter, the industrialist, and his wife. Then, as mysteriously as he arrived, he departs, leaving each of the family members devastated, fundamentally transformed in their identities as they reckon with the loss. Who is this young man? Is he a force of spiritual destruction or liberation? Through short prose chapters interspersed with poetry, Pasolini offers both a searing critique of the spiritual emptiness of bourgeois consciousness and an interrogation of existential meaning under capitalism.

Out this week from , A Strange Life: Selected Essays of Louisa May Alcott shows another side to one of nineteenth-centur...
11/01/2023

Out this week from , A Strange Life: Selected Essays of Louisa May Alcott shows another side to one of nineteenth-century literature’s most beloved writers. Though best known as the author of Little Women, Louisa May Alcott was also a skilled essayist & reporter. A Strange Life collects some of the best of Alcott’s acute, witty nonfiction, which covers everything from her father’s failed utopian commune to the benefits of an unmarried life to her experiences as an army nurse during the Civil War. In her preface, Jane Smiley places Alcott on the level of Jane Austen, Virginia Woolf, and George Eliot: “[Alcott] offers a view of the nineteenth century that we haven’t seen before, and that is extremely enlightening.”

Happy Halloween from Ernie Bushmiller’s Nancy! Nancy & Sluggo’s Guide to Life, a collection of Nancy comic strips from ,...
10/31/2023

Happy Halloween from Ernie Bushmiller’s Nancy! Nancy & Sluggo’s Guide to Life, a collection of Nancy comic strips from , will arrive this spring.

“I don’t think I have ever read anything like this before—a tale of life, death, love and beauty…. I hope this unforgett...
10/17/2023

“I don’t think I have ever read anything like this before—a tale of life, death, love and beauty…. I hope this unforgettable story finds all the readers it deserves.” —Philip Pullman ✨

Out today, Roberto Piumini’s novel for young readers, Glowrushes, is a classic in its homeland of Italy. The story follows an artist who has been commissioned to paint the rooms of a child confined to the indoors due to a life-threatening illness. Child and painter collaborate to adorn the rooms with depictions of the fabulous world outside the walls, from sweeping rural landscapes, to the deep blue sea teaming with pirates and frigates. The boy comes up with the concept of “glowrushes,” reeds that glow in the dark in the marshland region of their creation. Thanks to the painter’s genius, the scenes evolve according to season and the action of inhabiting characters. Over the course of their time together, the boy and the artist become dear friends, even as the child grows more ill by the day.

Finally available to US readers for the first time in Leah Janeczko’s English translation, this is Piumini’s masterpiece and a remarkable story about art and love.

In May 2016, Phillip Lopate was engaged to keep a blog for The American Scholar, writing forty-eight brief entries over ...
10/13/2023

In May 2016, Phillip Lopate was engaged to keep a blog for The American Scholar, writing forty-eight brief entries over the course of a year. It was an experiment, and what came out of it was A Year and a Day, a virtuosic (if never showy) demonstration of the essay’s range and reach, meandering, looping back, hitting reset, forging on.

Lopate’s topics along the way include family, James Baldwin, trips to China, Agnes Martin, Abbas Kiarostami, the resistible rise of Donald Trump, death, desire, and the tribulations, small and large, of daily life. Blog posts morph into one free-flowing volume, amounting to a sort of public diary, a self-portrait built in weekly bursts. Lopate’s tone is colloquial and lighthearted, and at times self-deprecating, always honest but never overly serious-minded, A Year and a Day is a dazzling potpourri of essays by a master of the form.

Freya, the goddess of love, in D’Aulaires’ Book of Norse Myths, by Ingri and Edgar Parin d’Aulaire, now on sale in paper...
10/12/2023

Freya, the goddess of love, in D’Aulaires’ Book of Norse Myths, by Ingri and Edgar Parin d’Aulaire, now on sale in paperback. 💛

Tomorrow at Rizzoli Bookstore (1133 Brodway, NYC) at 6pm!Ed Subitzky talks about the first collection of his work, Poor ...
10/12/2023

Tomorrow at Rizzoli Bookstore (1133 Brodway, NYC) at 6pm!

Ed Subitzky talks about the first collection of his work, Poor Helpless Comics ("a playful, risk-taking, revolutionary comedic vision that never fails to astonish") with Mark Newgarden and Owen.

Drinks and snacks follow the conversation. Don't miss!

This coming Tuesday (10/10)  Seaport store.An event for the essay-lovers. Phillip Lopate is a modern-day Montaigne and h...
10/05/2023

This coming Tuesday (10/10) Seaport store.

An event for the essay-lovers. Phillip Lopate is a modern-day Montaigne and his latest, A Year and a Day, is a collection of short essays he wrote each week in 2016. Call it a blog. What comes to Lopate’s mind and pen over the course of a year? Art, movies, and books (Agnes Martin, Abbas Kiarostami, James Baldwin); his family, teaching job, and home improvements; book events and writers’ envy; a trip to China; and the incredible and resistible political rise of Donald Trump.

Lopate will be in conversation with the incomparable Vivian Gornick.

“The whole universe is here. / Every colour, a few / on the verge of being barely tolerable.” —Amit Chaudhuri, from the ...
10/05/2023

“The whole universe is here. / Every colour, a few / on the verge of being barely tolerable.” —Amit Chaudhuri, from the title poem of Sweet Shop 🍬

The latest addition to the NYRB Poets series goes on sale today: Sweet Shop: New and Selected Poems, 1985–2023, a collection of Amit Chaudhuri’s poetry from across three books, plus some new and previously uncollected work and translations from Bengali. We’ve published two novels by Amit Chaudhuri—Friend of My Youth and Sojourn—as well as his book of nonfiction about music, Finding the Raga. Readers will recognize themes from those works of prose in these beguiling poems: geography, city life, the life of the writer, and of course, perhaps above all, the pleasures and politics of food.

Boston/Cambridge residents, tomorrow (Wednesday 10/4, at 7pm) Susie Boyt will be speaking about her new book, Loved and ...
10/03/2023

Boston/Cambridge residents, tomorrow (Wednesday 10/4, at 7pm) Susie Boyt will be speaking about her new book, Loved and Missed, with Claire Messud at Porter Square Books.

Boyt did an event last night in NYC and it was one of the best literary talks in memory.

Tonight at  Seaport (4 Fulton St.). Wine before the talk at 6:30pm.
10/02/2023

Tonight at Seaport (4 Fulton St.). Wine before the talk at 6:30pm.

““O, it has happened little by little, as many things simply happen little by little, Mother said, and told us everythin...
09/29/2023

““O, it has happened little by little, as many things simply happen little by little, Mother said, and told us everything about Herr Veilchenfeld, as far as it was known to her.” —Gert Hofmann, Our Philosopher, translated from the German by Eric Mace-Tessler, now on sale

Set in late 1930s Germany, Hofmann’s Our Philosopher is a spare and haunting tale of prejudice, violence, and complicity. Told through the fragmented perspective of a young boy, Hans, the novel follows the story of philosopher Herr Veilchenfeld, a great thinker and professor who has recently been dismissed from his university and forced to retire in a small town. There, Herr Veilchenfeld meets Hans and his family, who treat the philosopher with respect but regard him with paranoid caution. Not understanding everything he sees but relaying it to us all the same, Hans watches as anti-Semitism and nationalist fervor change his town from the inside out, turning seemingly ordinary townsfolk into agents of extremism and racial violence.

Robert Bresson, the director of such cinematic masterpieces as Pickpocket, A Man Escaped, Diary of a Country Priest, Mou...
09/26/2023

Robert Bresson, the director of such cinematic masterpieces as Pickpocket, A Man Escaped, Diary of a Country Priest, Mouchette, and L’Argent, was one of the most influential directors in the history of French film. His films have been watched, analyzed, copied, and admired by directors, critics, and cinema fans for decades. In Bresson on Bresson, now available in paperback, edited by Mylène Bresson and translated by Anna Moschovskis, the director explains himself.

Bresson on Bresson collates decades of interviews, throughout which Bresson’s theory of cinema emerges and a picture of one of history’s great directors is rendered from all angles. Arranged chronologically and organized by film release, this collection presents a complete view of Bresson’s career and unparalleled access to his artistic evolution. Bresson talks about using and struggling to guide professional actors in his early films, then his eventual decision in favor of his amateur “models”; an aversion to color film gives way to an admission of color’s strength; the question of literary adaptation comes up, as does the nature of the soundtrack.

Susie Boyt’s Loved and Missed gets its American welcome today. It’s a beautifully written novel, heartbreaking, funny, w...
09/19/2023

Susie Boyt’s Loved and Missed gets its American welcome today. It’s a beautifully written novel, heartbreaking, funny, with pitch-perfect scenes and dialogue, and characters who will stick in your mind. Ruth is a schoolteacher whose daughter, Eleanor, is an addict. Eleanor gives birth to Lily, who Ruth soon takes into her care after someone ODs in Eleanor's house. Hope and happiness; rejection and illness; parenting, mistakes, and life lessons all fill this book which should be loved and not missed.

We’re not the only ones who appreciate—some blurbs and excerpts from reviews below.

“With this exquisite devotional of a novel, [Susie Boyt] has turned the ability to find contentment in the muck of parenthood into a courageous art form.” —Hillary Kelly,

“What a beautiful, illuminating and deeply humane novel Susie Boyt has given us—her prose glorious, her characters alive upon the page, their voices and gestures utterly vivid. Loved and Missed, rich like life itself in sorrow, comedy and joy, is a triumph.” —

“Loved and Missed is a story of parental love and human failing that’s more funny than it has any right to be, more heartbreaking than you think you can bear; it’s the sort of book you can’t wait to recommend to everyone you know, the sort of book we are lucky to have.” —

New from , a classic work of architectural criticism by the late Ian Nairn. First published in 1964, the book was writte...
09/15/2023

New from , a classic work of architectural criticism by the late Ian Nairn. First published in 1964, the book was written “by a layman for laymen,” celebrating the character of London buildings both famous and obscure. Moving from distinguished structures such as the Barbican and the former BBC Television Centre to more concealed treasures such as hospitals, schools, car parks, and even care homes, Nairn forms a sort of alternative guidebook to the city of London, pointing toward the everyday beauty hidden everywhere on its streets. As he writes of one building, “It is hardly noticeable at first, but the more often you see it, the better it seems—and this, after all, is one of the real tests of architecture.”

The Limit is the first of Rosalind Belben’s novels to be published in the U. S. The narration switches between a husband...
09/12/2023

The Limit is the first of Rosalind Belben’s novels to be published in the U. S. The narration switches between a husband and wife: Anna, who is dying in in a hospital bed, and Ilario, a younger Italian sailor. They recall their courtship; initial (not-so-great) s*x; each other’s bodies, flaws and all; a scary voyage in a ship Ilario captains (during which, better s*x); Anna’s illness and her physical and mental disintegration.

It’s a short, singular novel about love, death, and disgust. Ilario thinks of his future after his wife’s death; he deals with the casual bigotry of Anna’s family. Anna must work to put together her thoughts and memories in her final moments.

Reminiscent of Virginia Woolf and William Faulkner, Belben’s book originally came out in 1974 but received scant attention. This new edition, with an introduction by Paul Griffiths (author of Mr. Beethoven), comes out today. We hope it’ll find a new and appreciative audience.

“I call for passion and wisdom / joined at the waist / like a centaur.” —Zuzanna Ginczanka, “On Centaurs,” translated by...
08/29/2023

“I call for passion and wisdom / joined at the waist / like a centaur.” —Zuzanna Ginczanka, “On Centaurs,” translated by Alissa Valles 🔥

Last week NYRB Poets published Firebird, a collection of new translations of work by Zuzanna Ginczanka, a Polish writer, famous in her time but, until recently, largely forgotten. Ginczanka’s last poem, “Non Omnis moriar…ˆ” is her most famous. She wrote it shortly before her ex*****on by the N**is and, in the poem, boldly unmasks the woman who betrayed her to the occupiers as a Jew. Firebird includes this poem and many more, including the entirety of the one collection she published in her lifetime, On Centaurs, all newly translated by Alissa Valles. It’s a beautiful and, yes, fiery, book.

Coming this autumn, the return of P.I. Eugene Tarpon in Jean-Patrick Manchette’s Skeletons in the Closet, (tr. Alyson Wa...
08/28/2023

Coming this autumn, the return of P.I. Eugene Tarpon in Jean-Patrick Manchette’s Skeletons in the Closet, (tr. Alyson Waters). Cover painting by Otto Piene and Reflex Blue (iykyk).

Private eye Eugene Tarpon is back to sleeping in his office, waiting for a paying job to turn up. Then he gets a call from a sometime contact in the police department. He’s referring a nice old lady—a distant relative—to Tarpon; her daughter’s gone missing and, the cop says, there’s no finding her. There are no leads.

But the old lady’s pigheaded. Do me a favor, he tells Tarpon. Humor her. Take her off our hands. Take her money, too. And, by the way, there’s no need to investigate the actual business at all.

The Limit is a short and powerful novel about death, lust, and disgust. Switching between the perspectives of the ill An...
08/16/2023

The Limit is a short and powerful novel about death, lust, and disgust. Switching between the perspectives of the ill Anna and her husband, Ilario, a much younger Italian sailor, this altogether singular novel has been as good as unobtainable for decades and comes out for the first time in the U. S. on September 19. Who’s a fan of Virginia Woolf? This may be a novel for you.

Two by Diana Athill, on sale today. ✨ A legendary editor at André Deutsch—where she worked with the likes of Margaret At...
08/15/2023

Two by Diana Athill, on sale today. ✨

A legendary editor at André Deutsch—where she worked with the likes of Margaret Atwood, Philip Roth, Simone de Beauvoir, Norman Mailer, Stevie Smith, and Jack Kerouac—Athill (1917–2019) became known as a talented writer in her own right, mostly for her intimate memoirs, one of which NYRB Classics is publishing today.

Instead of a Letter details Athill’s own coming-of-age, including the story of her tragic first love, life during World War II, and the start of her career as an editor. It is a tender, sometimes brutally honest look at the ways life can be both unfair and full of promise.

Don’t Look at Me Like That is the only novel Athill published in her lifetime, and it is a coming-of-age story of sorts, too. Meg Bailey, a reserved young woman, enrolls in art school, becomes an illustrator in London, and risks all for love, turning her life and her relationships with those around her upside-down.

Instead of a Letter has an afterword by Lena Dunham and Don’t Look at Me Like includes an afterword by Helen Oyeyemi.

Cover art for both books by Bea Nettles.

🚨 We are currently hiring interns for our book marketing and publicity department for September – December 2023. Find ou...
08/09/2023

🚨 We are currently hiring interns for our book marketing and publicity department for September – December 2023. Find out more by visiting nyrb.com/pages/internships

Coming in October, the eerie My Death by Lisa Tuttle, who Neil Gaiman has called “one of the dangerous ones, the kind of...
08/07/2023

Coming in October, the eerie My Death by Lisa Tuttle, who Neil Gaiman has called “one of the dangerous ones, the kind of writer that somebody really should have warned you about.”

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