CBS News Internship Program

CBS News Internship Program Welcome to the official CBS News Internship page! If you are a former intern let us know where you are now!
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Fritz Farrow is interning with 60 Minutes this Fall semester. He attends the University of Central Florida where he doub...
09/28/2020

Fritz Farrow is interning with 60 Minutes this Fall semester. He attends the University of Central Florida where he double majors in Political Science and Journalism. #internspotlight
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“The most exciting aspect of this internship is having the opportunity to work on editorial projects. The stories 60 Minutes broadcasts are compelling and insightful. It's an incredible feeling to know I can play an active role.”

#TBT to some of our interns who participated in stand-ins for Super Tuesday preparation. #internperks -📸: DeLon Thornton
08/20/2020

#TBT to some of our interns who participated in stand-ins for Super Tuesday preparation. #internperks
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📸: DeLon Thornton

07/30/2020

HAPPY NATIONAL INTERN DAY to all of our amazing past, present and future interns! #nationalinternday

📸: VIACOMCBS Interns

07/24/2020
Family of Drummers Perform on Fremont Street

‪“Family of Drummers Perform on Fremont Street: Street performers are fan favorites in Downtown Las Vegas. For my project, I wanted to explore something unique to Las Vegas, and find out how street performers handled having to stay home due to COVID-19 closures.”‬ - Guy Tannenbaum

Guy Tannenbaum is from Las Vegas, and is a senior at Buena Vista University majoring in Digital Media/Broadcast Journali...
07/24/2020

Guy Tannenbaum is from Las Vegas, and is a senior at Buena Vista University majoring in Digital Media/Broadcast Journalism and Political Science.

“CBS News was always on in my house growing up. Watching Scott Pelley anchor the Evening News and on 60 Minutes is a big reason why I wanted to be a journalist. Being able to fulfill a childhood dream to work for CBS News–albiet virutally–and learn from the best in the business (and some of my personal heroes) was an absolutely incredible experience.”

07/23/2020
Nourishing Lives: Food Distribution

‪As South Florida’s number of COVID-19 cases rise, one non-profit organization continues to give back to the Broward County community and help those in their time of need. Our intern Gianna Sanchez brings us the story.‬

Gianna Sanchez is a rising senior at the University of Miami where she majors in Broadcast Journalism. “My favorite part...
07/23/2020

Gianna Sanchez is a rising senior at the University of Miami where she majors in Broadcast Journalism.

“My favorite part of the internship was hearing from so many different industry professionals. It gave me a better idea of what specific field I want to pursue in the future and also gave me the opportunity to connect with so many people across CBS News!”

07/22/2020
Pandemic Snake Bites

With more people spending time around their homes during the COVID-19 pandemic, North Carolina emergency rooms are treating more poisonous snake bites than normal. Our intern Ford Hatchett brings us the story.

Ford Hatchett is a senior at Syracuse University. He is majoring in Broadcast & Digital Journalism and Political Science...
07/22/2020

Ford Hatchett is a senior at Syracuse University. He is majoring in Broadcast & Digital Journalism and Political Science with a minor in Finance.

“This internship has given me the chance to learn from some legends in our industry and interact with some of the brightest minds in our industry's next generation. All the while, I've improved my own skills and gotten an intimate look at the operations of a world renowned news network.”

07/21/2020
Thayne Jasperson’s Life in Quarantine

Thayne Jasperson is the last remaining original cast member in Hamilton on Broadway. The actor tells CBS News intern John Cooper what he's been up to since COVID-19 shut down theatres on Broadway and across the nation. #internproject

John Cooper says he's "incredibly proud of the virtual community our intern cohort was able to build. We joked, cheered ...
07/21/2020

John Cooper says he's "incredibly proud of the virtual community our intern cohort was able to build. We joked, cheered each other on, answered questions, sent reminders, and supported each other wherever possible. Everyone really did their part to limit the social effects of our physical distance and make the best of this strange new way of living and working." John is a senior at Yale University.

07/20/2020

“Gyms have been one of the most anticipated businesses to reopen since the start of the pandemic. For my report, I explore the extent that a local boxing gym in Orange County, CA implements coronavirus safety precautions upon their reopening.” - Colette Ngo #internproject

Colette Ngo is a senior at Chapman University where she majors in Broadcast Journalism and Business Marketing.“What I lo...
07/20/2020

Colette Ngo is a senior at Chapman University where she majors in Broadcast Journalism and Business Marketing.

“What I loved most about the virtual internship at CBS News is that I was able to connect with so many insightful reporters, producers and executives. I was also able to build friendships with my fellow interns that came from all different parts of the US. We all got to know each other and supported one another throughout the internship. Despite today’s circumstances, I’ll never forget this summer with CBS News.”

Over the past couple of weeks, our interns were tasked with shooting, producing and editing their own stories. Here are ...
07/17/2020

Over the past couple of weeks, our interns were tasked with shooting, producing and editing their own stories. Here are some shots of our interns doing what they love to do. #internships

‪“The best part of my CBS News internship going virtual? Getting to cover local stories that lead me to meet cuties like...
07/13/2020

‪“The best part of my CBS News internship going virtual? Getting to cover local stories that lead me to meet cuties like Odin here from Spirits Promise“ - Mary Alter‬

Today, our interns received the opportunity to speak with the one and only Susan Zirinsky! #internperks
07/07/2020

Today, our interns received the opportunity to speak with the one and only Susan Zirinsky! #internperks

This week we started our very first virtual internship program. Here are some of our 2020 class of summer interns!!
06/25/2020

This week we started our very first virtual internship program. Here are some of our 2020 class of summer interns!!

Sammie Green majors in Telecommunication News at the University of Florida. She interned with CBSN’s Red & Blue during t...
06/22/2020

Sammie Green majors in Telecommunication News at the University of Florida. She interned with CBSN’s Red & Blue during the spring semester. #internspotlight
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“The most exciting part of being with CBSN is being able to be a part of such a hectic election season. It’s such a cool experience to not only watch history unfold but also be a part of the coverage - from the impeachment trial to the 2020 campaigns. There is something new every single day, always keeping it interesting!”

Katie Parkins is a Master of Arts in Journalism major at the University of Missouri, Columbia. She interned with Face Th...
06/18/2020

Katie Parkins is a Master of Arts in Journalism major at the University of Missouri, Columbia. She interned with Face The Nation during the spring semester. #internspotlight
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“The most exciting aspect of the internship program is getting to work with such unbelievably talented people like Margaret Brennan, the executive producer of Face the Nation Mary Hager, and the whole FTN team. It’s incredible doing research and work for FTN to prepare for guests like Secretary of State Mike Pompeo and former Vice President Joe Biden, only to name a few. You’re working with history makers every day.”

#INTERNSPOTLIGHT: Sarah Jackson attends NYU where she majors in Journalism and English. She spent the spring semester in...
06/17/2020

#INTERNSPOTLIGHT: Sarah Jackson attends NYU where she majors in Journalism and English. She spent the spring semester interning with Weekend News.
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“On my second day, I got to help with a live shot on the roof of the Broadcast Center. It was snowing heavily all day, but it was a wonderful experience to see a live shot behind the scenes -- and the view from there was great as well!”

‪#INTERNSPOTLIGHT: Graysen Golter attends The University of Texas at Austin where he majors in Journalism. He interned w...
06/16/2020

‪#INTERNSPOTLIGHT: Graysen Golter attends The University of Texas at Austin where he majors in Journalism. He interned with 60 Minutes this spring.‬
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‪“I found the access to be the most exciting part of the internship. Whether it was watching old interviews that have never been aired or being able to help producers with an upcoming story, it was always rewarding to learn more about this side of the industry.”‬

Angela Perez attends Georgetown University where she majors in Political Science with a minor in Journalism. She interne...
06/15/2020

Angela Perez attends Georgetown University where she majors in Political Science with a minor in Journalism. She interned with the political unit in our DC Bureau this spring. #internspotlight
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“I had the opportunity to help prepare for the Democratic debate CBS hosted in February with the rest of the political unit! Sitting in on meetings and phone calls and contributing research for possible questions was really cool.”

We’re ending this week with an #internspotlight. Andrea Pineda-Salgado attends New York University where she double majo...
06/12/2020

We’re ending this week with an #internspotlight. Andrea Pineda-Salgado attends New York University where she double majors in Communications and Journalism & Media Culture. She interned with the documentary development unit this spring.
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“The most exciting aspect of the internship program was being able to hear the wise words of Bob Schieffer and Leslie Stahl at a panel. I also loved helping out in the control room during the primaries, it was fascinating to see how everything happens live.”

Elaina Aliferis attends Ithaca College where she majors in Television-Radio. She spent this spring semester with CBS Thi...
06/10/2020

Elaina Aliferis attends Ithaca College where she majors in Television-Radio. She spent this spring semester with CBS This Morning. #internspotlight
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“The most exciting part of my internship was learning how to navigate the CBS This Morning social media platforms. I got to help the digital team with their Viewer Questions Friday segment by compiling all the questions they got on social media and through email.” Elaina also received the opportunity to book a hand sanitizer distribution company in New Jersey for a story on CTM.

Blythe Edwards studies political science at Columbia University. She spent the spring semester with the political unit. ...
06/08/2020

Blythe Edwards studies political science at Columbia University. She spent the spring semester with the political unit. #internspotlight
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Blythe found the opportunity to work closely with, and learn from, professionals at the top of their game the most exciting aspect of the internship program. “Everyone has been incredibly welcoming.”
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“My favorite days were the late nights at the office covering the incoming primary election results and the Democratic debates. I also really appreciated that after Covid-19 forced us to go remote, my supervisors kept me in the loop and continued giving me work to do, this time on the governors' press conferences about their states' Covid response.”

06/05/2020

“Adopt” a High School Senior

By Andrea Pineda-Salgado

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SPRING 2020 INTERN PROJECT

During this time of uncertainty, we tasked our interns with writing an article and producing a 1 minute segment about how COVID-19 is affecting an aspect of their lives.

06/04/2020

This engaged couple is working together to equip local and international communities with tools to help slow the spread of COVID-19. Our intern, Almaz Abedje, brings us the story.

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SPRING 2020 INTERN PROJECT

During this time of uncertainty, we tasked our interns with writing an article and producing a 1 minute segment about how COVID-19 is affecting an aspect of their lives.

SPRING 2020 INTERN PROJECTDuring this time of uncertainty, we tasked our interns with writing an article and producing a...
06/04/2020

SPRING 2020 INTERN PROJECT

During this time of uncertainty, we tasked our interns with writing an article and producing a 1 minute segment about how COVID-19 is affecting an aspect of their lives.

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Keeping the Faith: A Temple’s Response to a Global Pandemic

By Rachel Armany

As a stay at home order and social distancing guidelines remain in effect in Massachusetts, local organizations have dealt with the challenges of conducting their regular operations without meeting in person.

Sandra Stogel is the Judaica Gift Shop manager for Ahavath Torah Congregation (ATC) in Stoughton, Massachusetts. She is among one of the many congregants who are currently unable to go inside the building they usually visit every week.

“It's very important to everyone who is of the Jewish faith that there's a place to go. A place to pray, a place to talk to someone if you have a problem, such as a rabbi.”

Jonathan Hausman一the rabbi of ATC─says that religious organizations such as a Jewish synagogue are adversely impacted due to their community-based practice model.

“My feeling was always, you want to hear me preach, you want to hear me teach? Come to the synagogue,” Hausman said. “How we do study and how we worship, how we bury our dead, has always been a community and communal experience.”

Shortly after the World Health Organization declared COVID-19 a pandemic, ATC staff responded quickly by halting all in-person gatherings such as daily prayer services, speaker events and weekly bingo since mid-March.

Robert Bornstein, the President of ATC, said that one of the aspects people don’t consider with religious institutions is the financial challenges of trying to stay afloat, especially during a pandemic.

“We don't make anything tangible. What we do is it's an intangible that we produce out of a place,” he said. “But it is a business. You have payroll, you have expenses, you've got overhead and you have everything that goes in it.”

Bornstein added that even with supplemental grants and loans, the synagogue is not able to reach nearly the same level of income it had before coronavirus hit the U.S.

“To try and make up for the shortfall, I just did a ‘Count Your Blessings’ fundraiser for people,” Bornstein said. “I'm making dinner for a little over 100 people. They can pick it up, go home, and they can reheat it.”

After picking up their dinners, congregants are invited to join the rabbi for services virtually. “So it'd be just like coming to synagogue, having a dinner and then going to services,” he said.

Despite the technological dilemmas of switching to a virtual model, ATC leadership has acted quickly to move prayer services to platforms like Zoom or telephone conference calls.

“We're doing better with attendance for worship now on Zoom than we did actually physically in the synagogue,” Hausman said. “Interestingly, we've had an easier time trying to create this community. Notwithstanding, we do have some people who are, shall we say, they're not technological wizards--but they're getting on somehow.”

Hausman added that although in-person services have halted, he is still officiating funerals in person while adhering to social distancing guidelines.

“My feeling is if you want a rabbi to officiate, then it's my responsibility to take the precautions that I need to take in order to be at the cemetery with the family to officiate,” he said. “But I can't go visit anybody at the hospital, can’t visit anybody at a nursing home, can't visit anybody at a rehab center, can't do any--most of the responsibilities that normally take up a good portion of my day.”

Another service that has shifted to virtual channels is the Hebrew school for students in kindergarten through eighth grade.

Madeleine Lewis--who is the Lead Teacher and Education Director of the Rabbi Gerson South Area Religious School at ATC--said that the process of conducting classes over video conferencing has been both technologically and personally challenging.

“It’s not my thing to stand there and talk,” she said. “But, we’re doing the best that we can.”

Lewis said that it’s important to continue classes remotely to make sure the community remains together during uncertainty.

“I want them to know that we are thinking of them,” she said. “And Judaism has always gone on whether there's a pandemic or anything.”

Along with offering online services, Hausman also stressed ATC’s practice of checking in through calls and emails to offer assistance with groceries and other essential tasks--especially for older congregants.

“More and more people are just thankful for the phone call than anything else,” he said. “That's what we're here to do, make this world a little bit holier today than it was yesterday.”

06/03/2020

SPRING 2020 INTERN PROJECT

During this time of uncertainty, we tasked our interns with writing an article and producing a 1 minute segment about how COVID-19 is affecting an aspect of their lives.

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Student newsrooms tell on-campus coronavirus news from off-campus

By Rachel Cohen

Editor in Chief of The Daily Pennsylvanian Max Cohen, 20, has seen the coronavirus spark “a tremendous appetite for journalism” on his University of Pennsylvania campus. But the junior considers the coronavirus to be a “double edged sword” affecting the college paper. “On one hand, there’s so many stories right now and also everyone's reading the news,” Cohen said. Yet, with students gone from the Philadelphia campus, Cohen feels the paper cannot replicate its normal product without its collaborative environment.

“Your office, it’s like the heartbeat of the organization,” Cohen said. “Talking over Slack, over Zoom, over text— it’s not the same,” he said. “It's just everything is made so much harder.”

Normally, the publication produces two newspapers and an art magazine per week. They also offer a daily newsletter. After receiving word that campus would be closing, several students compiled one last paper, which Cohen called their “last print hurrah.” Now, they can only provide their daily digital newsletter.

The struggles of The Daily Pennsylvanian reflect the reality in many college newsrooms across the country. When the novel coronavirus intensified in the United States, universities recognized that in-person classes were no longer a safe and viable option. The sudden escalation of the national response to the virus left many students destabilized. Most college students heard that their semester transitioned online in early March. During a usually vibrant time of year, filled with graduations and spring festivities, on-campus student populations have dwindled to record lows.

During an unprecedented time with news breaking every day, many college students have turned to their campus media outlets as a resource. But with the coronavirus uprooting universities, student journalists are navigating uncharted territory to keep their readers informed and their publications still running.

University of Michigan junior Elizabeth Lawrence, 20, is the Editor and Chief of The Michigan Daily. Famously the only daily print paper in Ann Arbor, Michigan, The Daily serves the university and the town community at large.

The fast acceleration of the coronavirus altered expected programming for The Daily, specifically in an election year. “I feel like it was just such a quick turnaround in figuring out like, first we were focusing on like the Michigan Primary and how much of a big deal that was,” Lawrence said. “We had to sort of change our whole approach to journalism and the way we were going to try and reach our readers.”

In a shift for the legacy newspaper, the remote newsroom team puts together a digitally accessible PDF of the traditional print paper Monday through Friday. “It’s such a huge part of the newsroom culture to come in every Sunday through Thursday night to make a paper for the next day,” she said. “It was weird to just sort of coordinate how to do that remotely like managing editors from their homes and their own computers.”

Lawrence has been impressed with the way her newsroom has adjusted to the limitations caused by the coronavirus. “I was lucky that everyone on staff really, really cares so much about The Daily and was excited to help think of a more meaningful way to keep producing our content even though we weren’t able to print.” The news section, she said, will adapt to conducting interviews over the phone or email. Although, some sections have struggled more than others.

“Coronavirus, obviously, is the story. We did a lot of that, but some other sections, it was hard, especially for sports,” she said. “There are no sports to cover. So, they had to really entirely pivot their content strategy.” Since Michigan has a large sports following, the coronavirus cancelling seasons creates difficulties for the paper. The writers published personal sports related columns and features on athletes in an absence of sporting events.

The loss of experience

Noah Telereski, 21, a senior at Georgetown University, is the Editor in Chief of The Georgetown Voice, a biweekly news magazine and website. Traditionally publishing features, opinion and culture in print, the publication was forced to dedicate that majority of its time to covering news. “We're doing a little story for every update and then we switch to the live blog format, which I think was probably better because it's streamlined everything a little bit,” Telerski said. “But it was really kind of all hands on deck.” Since the coronavirus, The Voice has noticed a considerable increase in traction to its page.

Telerski no longer oversaw print content from his campus in Washington, D.C., causing him to take on a different role than previous leaders of The Voice. “I feel like since I've been home, my role definitely changed. I kind of felt like I was more moral support for the most part because I had no expectations for anyone to actually be putting out things,” Telerski said. “We had a lot of really good stuff come out. But it was more important to me to make sure that people were getting settled in OK, and the newspaper definitely took a backseat.”

Telerski joined The Voice his freshman fall semester. Since then, he assumed many positions, and ultimately landed the Editor in Chief position for his senior spring. Graduating this week, Telerski won’t have the opportunity to carry out his tenure as head of the publication in the way he had imagined, but he tried to make the most of his time.

But what has been painful for him, he says, is missing out on the memories. “As much as I kind of resent staying up until 4 in the morning finishing an issue, I'm really disappointed that I'm missing out on that time,” he said. “Because as much as that's the worst part of it, it was also one of the best parts.”

Similar to Telerski, Max Cohen misses the classic newsroom activities, such as laughing with his team while catching last minute typos. “These are the kind of priceless moments that you're never going to get back,” he said.

Separated for the time being, Cohen and his colleagues have spent time reminiscing on their time together in January and February before the coronavirus came into full swing. “We're just praying that we'll be back, but there's so much uncertainty. So for me, a lot of it is hoping that I haven't produced my last print paper,” he said. “That would be so brutal, if this is how it ended.” Cohen will remain Editor and Chief throughout the year.

Lawrence has also taken solace in her staff and their dedication to the paper. “The people I've been working with have just remained incredibly supportive and everyone puts their all into it,” she said.

Lawrence has paused her Editor in Chief responsibilities for the summer and will resume them come the fall semester. The University of Michigan has yet to make an announcement on the fall semester, but Lawrence is optimistic for The Daily, even if it remains remote. “I’m still confident that I will be able to do something for The Daily, and really connect people even if we can’t meet in person.”

The challenges of virtual newsrooms

The possibility of another online semester in the fall includes risks to student publications.

Recruitment presents a huge obstacle for on-campus publications. At the beginning of the semester, many campus newsrooms accept applicants, host informational sessions and invite perspective reporters into their newsrooms. Without an influx of new students to replace the spots left absent by the current graduating class, the papers will struggle to cover campus life to its fullest capacity. Already, Cohen has noticed this shift in his newsroom, saying he’s noticed a reduction in staff.

Students are being tasked with navigating classes while enduring the burden of living through a pandemic. “Reporters are human too, right? We deal with the same stress that everyone else is dealing with during coronavirus. It's not easy to do it,” Cohen said.

This problem is amplified by logistical issues, such as getting in contact with campus administrators and coordinating newsroom events. After students returned home, issues of time zones and internet access impacted students’ ability to maintain their college routines.

“We also have a reporter who was in Sri Lanka. And there are no times for us to give him a call,” Cohen said. “Really those kinds of things about distance and time difference that have hit us hard.”

Telerski worries about the potential risks to student media funding if the coronavirus continues on for much longer. At Georgetown, student government bodies help allocate university funding for various groups on campus. If The Voice — which relies heavily on its print publication —does not have an on campus audience in the foreseeable future, their budget could be drastically reduced. Universities, themselves, are worried about their finances, meaning student projects could be affected.

Other papers, which rely on print and digital advertisements, will surely see a decrease in revenue as papers around the country buckle under the pressure of declines in advertising.

The evolution of student journalism after the coronavirus

While the coronavirus has been overwhelmingly negative for student papers, the rapid transition to online has allowed for colleges to look into new avenues of storytelling. “The way The Daily functions right now is very much centered around a five-day-a-week print product, which less and less people are reading and picking up as the years go on,” Lawrence said. The coronavirus has put their traditional model into perspective.” It has made those conversations about the future of The Daily — bettering of our digital presence — it’s been super helpful with that.”

The quick push to digital forced student newsrooms to become more adaptable with their content. Notably, Lawrence values social media for keeping The Daily content accessible for its readers. “Our social media editors have been fantastic and have been coming up with different engagement campaigns and ways to present stories and content that would just make a digital format,” she said.

Despite facing so much instability and uncertainty, student journalists remain dedicated to giving voice to their campus’ narratives. Cohen has witnessed these strong student journalist responses to the coronavirus, viewing their commitment as “the fundamental role” of being a true journalist. “You are the person who can give direction to people who are looking for information and for guidance, and we can use such a service,” he said.

Even if the fall semester becomes online, Cohen remains proud of the work his paper offers the university campus. “But I think at the end of the day, it is nice to know,” Cohen said, “that we are providing a community — that has so many questions — with answers.”

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