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Did you know?In 1799, a Russian army under Alexander Suvorov was ordered to march into Switzerland, link up with other f...
08/13/2020

Did you know?
In 1799, a Russian army under Alexander Suvorov was ordered to march into Switzerland, link up with other friendly forces and drive out the French.

Did you know?

In 1799, a Russian army under Alexander Suvorov was ordered to march into Switzerland, link up with other friendly forces and drive out the French.

Today in Military History10 August 1904Battle of the Yellow Sea was naval history's first major confrontation between mo...
08/10/2020

Today in Military History

10 August 1904

Battle of the Yellow Sea was naval history's first major confrontation between modern steel battleship fleets. The battle foiled an attempt by the Russian fleet at Port Arthur to break out and form up with counterparts from Vladivostok, forcing them to return to port. Four days later, the Battle off Ulsan similarly ended the Vladivostok group's sortie, forcing both fleets to remain at anchor. During the nearly seven hours of naval combat about four hours of direct combat there was approximately 7,382 rounds expended by both sides, ranging in size from 155 to 305 mm shells. Of those shells fired, approximately 5,956 had been from 155mm guns; 3,592 from the Imperial Japanese Navy, and 2,364 from the Imperial Russian Navy. Some 307 203mm shells had been fired by the IJN, and none by the Russian fleet. Adm. Vitgeft's fleet had expended 224 254mm shells compared to Tōgō's 33 shells. The long range gunnery duel that had commenced at a range of over 8 miles, and began with 305mm main gun fire, ended with 305mm gun fire in near darkness, during which time 862 305mm main gun rounds were fired; 259 from the Russian battleships, and 603 from the Japanese battleships.

Today in Military History
10 August 1904

Battle of the Yellow Sea was naval history's first major confrontation between modern steel battleship fleets. The battle foiled an attempt by the Russian fleet at Port Arthur to break out and form up with counterparts from Vladivostok, forcing them to return to port. Four days later, the Battle off Ulsan similarly ended the Vladivostok group's sortie, forcing both fleets to remain at anchor. During the nearly seven hours of naval combat about four hours of direct combat there was approximately 7,382 rounds expended by both sides, ranging in size from 155 to 305 mm shells. Of those shells fired, approximately 5,956 had been from 155mm guns; 3,592 from the Imperial Japanese Navy, and 2,364 from the Imperial Russian Navy. Some 307 203mm shells had been fired by the IJN, and none by the Russian fleet. Adm. Vitgeft's fleet had expended 224 254mm shells compared to Tōgō's 33 shells. The long range gunnery duel that had commenced at a range of over 8 miles, and began with 305mm main gun fire, ended with 305mm gun fire in near darkness, during which time 862 305mm main gun rounds were fired; 259 from the Russian battleships, and 603 from the Japanese battleships.

Today in 1388, the battle of Otterburn, a skirmish between the Scottish & the English, occurs resulting in a Scottish vi...
08/05/2020

Today in 1388, the battle of Otterburn, a skirmish between the Scottish & the English, occurs resulting in a Scottish victory.
This image shows the English line beginning to crumble
Artwork by Stephen Walsh from CAM 164: Otterburn 1388 by Peter Armstrong.

Today in 1388, the battle of Otterburn, a skirmish between the Scottish & the English, occurs resulting in a Scottish victory.
This image shows the English line beginning to crumble
Artwork by Stephen Walsh from CAM 164: Otterburn 1388 by Peter Armstrong:
https://bit.ly/2DGa3HV

Did you know?During the heat of battle Viking warriors would often take off their mailed shirts to give them more freedo...
08/04/2020

Did you know?

During the heat of battle Viking warriors would often take off their mailed shirts to give them more freedom of action. This was known as Bare-sank or Bare of Shirt. The word eventually evolved into the term “berserk.”

Did you know?

During the heat of battle Viking warriors would often take off their mailed shirts to give them more freedom of action. This was known as Bare-sank or Bare of Shirt. The word eventually evolved into the term “berserk.”

Did you know?In 1960 the Army research command bought four Curtiss Wright Air Jeeps that hovered off the ground on a thi...
07/30/2020

Did you know?
In 1960 the Army research command bought four Curtiss Wright Air Jeeps that hovered off the ground on a thin layer of air.

Did you know?

In 1960 the Army research command bought four Curtiss Wright Air Jeeps that hovered off the ground on a thin layer of air.

ON THIS DAY IN 1945: The Japanese submarine I-58 torpedoes and sinks the U.S. Navy heavy cruiser Indianapolis. Due to a ...
07/30/2020
Terror at Sea: The Tragic Sinking of the USS Indianapolis

ON THIS DAY IN 1945: The Japanese submarine I-58 torpedoes and sinks the U.S. Navy heavy cruiser Indianapolis. Due to a four day delay in finding the survivors, only 316 men from the nearly 1,200-man crew survive.

When the USS Indianapolis sank in shark-infested waters, the navy unjustly held its captain responsible. It took more than 50 years to clear his name

In July 1944, seven weeks after the D-Day landings, Operation Cobra was launched by the United States First Army with th...
07/28/2020

In July 1944, seven weeks after the D-Day landings, Operation Cobra was launched by the United States First Army with the aim to break out of Normandy and into Brittany. Lacking the resources to cope with the situation, the German response was ineffectual and the entire Normandy front soon collapsed. Operation Cobra, together with concurrent offensives by the British Second Army and the Canadian First Army, was decisive in securing an Allied victory in the Normandy campaign.

This illustration depicts one of the first tank clashes during Operation Cobra, which occurred in the village of Saint-Gilles between a Sherman and a Mark IV.

In July 1944, seven weeks after the D-Day landings, Operation Cobra was launched by the United States First Army with the aim to break out of Normandy and into Brittany. Lacking the resources to cope with the situation, the German response was ineffectual and the entire Normandy front soon collapsed. Operation Cobra, together with concurrent offensives by the British Second Army and the Canadian First Army, was decisive in securing an Allied victory in the Normandy campaign.

This illustration depicts one of the first tank clashes during Operation Cobra, which occurred in the village of Saint-Gilles between a Sherman and a Mark IV.

Artwork by Richard Chasemore from DUE 70: Panzer IV vs Sherman written by Steven J. Zaloga. Get your copy here: https://bit.ly/30X47lM

Did you know?On 3 July 1898, during the Spanish-American War, the American fleet only lost one sailor in their victory o...
07/28/2020

Did you know?
On 3 July 1898, during the Spanish-American War, the American fleet only lost one sailor in their victory over the Spanish fleet at the Battle of Santiago de Cuba. (Photo by Benjamín Núñez González)

Did you know?

On 3 July 1898, during the Spanish-American War, the American fleet only lost one sailor in their victory over the Spanish fleet at the Battle of Santiago de Cuba. (Photo by Benjamín Núñez González)

Today in Military History27 July 1778 British and French fleets fought to a standoff in the first Battle of Ushant. The ...
07/27/2020

Today in Military History

27 July 1778

British and French fleets fought to a standoff in the first Battle of Ushant. The British had 30 ships of the line, four frigates, and two fire-ships commanded by Adm. Augustus Keppel in HMS Victory. The French had 32 ships of the line, seven frigates, five corvettes and one lugger, commanded by Vice-Adm. Comte d’Orvilliers. The two fleets maneuvered during shifting winds and a heavy rain squall until a battle became inevitable with the British more or less in column and the French in some confusion. However, the French managed to pass along the British line to windward with their most advanced ships. At about a quarter to twelve HMS Victory opened fire on Bretagne, 110, followed by Ville de Paris, 90. The British van escaped with little loss but Sir Hugh Palliser’s rear division suffered considerably. Keppel made the signal to wear and follow the French but Palliser did not conform and the action was not resumed. Keppel was court-martialed and cleared and Palliser criticized by an enquiry before the affair turned into a squabble of party politics.

Today in Military History
27 July 1778

British and French fleets fought to a standoff in the first Battle of Ushant. The British had 30 ships of the line, four frigates, and two fire-ships commanded by Adm. Augustus Keppel in HMS Victory. The French had 32 ships of the line, seven frigates, five corvettes and one lugger, commanded by Vice-Adm. Comte d’Orvilliers. The two fleets maneuvered during shifting winds and a heavy rain squall until a battle became inevitable with the British more or less in column and the French in some confusion. However, the French managed to pass along the British line to windward with their most advanced ships. At about a quarter to twelve HMS Victory opened fire on Bretagne, 110, followed by Ville de Paris, 90. The British van escaped with little loss but Sir Hugh Palliser’s rear division suffered considerably. Keppel made the signal to wear and follow the French but Palliser did not conform and the action was not resumed. Keppel was court-martialed and cleared and Palliser criticized by an enquiry before the affair turned into a squabble of party politics.

At the Coa River on 24 July 1810, during the Peninsular War, Brigadier-General Robert Craufurd and his Light Division we...
07/24/2020
Bussaco 1810

At the Coa River on 24 July 1810, during the Peninsular War, Brigadier-General Robert Craufurd and his Light Division were very nearly caught napping by Marshal Ney’s 6th French Corps. Craufurd miscalculated the strength and the swiftness of the French attack and his men had to fight hard to extricate themselves from a difficult situation. The Coa River bridge was their only means of escape and had to be held at all costs. The scene shown is in the latter stages of the battle when the Light Division had successfully retired across the bridge and French attempts to cross were beaten back.
Artwork by Patrice Courcelle and taken from CAM 97: Bussaco 1810: https://bit.ly/2CXJVrO

By 1810, Napoleon reigned supreme over most of continental Europe. But the Iberian Peninsula remained unsubdued, particularly Portugal, which continued to resist. Napoleon ordered Marshal Masséna to crush this resistance with the Army of Portugal. Greatly strengthened, Masséna's army would drive t...

Did you know?The first aerial engagement in which a helicopter shot down another helicopter occurred near Dezful Iran on...
07/22/2020

Did you know?
The first aerial engagement in which a helicopter shot down another helicopter occurred near Dezful Iran on 8 November 1980 when two Iranian AH-1Js attacked two Iraqi MI-24s. The Iranians shot down one MI-24 and badly damaged the other.

Did you know?

The first aerial engagement in which a helicopter shot down another helicopter occurred near Dezful Iran on 8 November 1980 when two Iranian AH-1Js attacked two Iraqi MI-24s. The Iranians shot down one MI-24 and badly damaged the other.

Today in Military History15 July 1918Second Battle of the Marne begins and was the last major German offensive on the We...
07/15/2020

Today in Military History
15 July 1918

Second Battle of the Marne begins and was the last major German offensive on the Western Front during the First World War. Following the failure of the Spring Offensive to end the conflict, Erich Ludendorff, believed an attack through Flanders would give Germany a decisive victory over the British Expeditionary Force. To shield his intentions and draw Allied troops away from Belgium, Ludendorff planned for a large diversionary attack along the Marne. The battle began when 23 German divisions of the First and Third armies assaulted the French Fourth Army under Henri Gouraud east of Reims. The attack failed when an Allied counterattack, supported by several hundred tanks, overwhelmed the Germans on their right flank, inflicting severe casualties. The German defeat marked the start of the relentless Allied advance that culminated in the Armistice with Germany about 100 days later. (Images from the German Federal Archive)

Today in Military History
15 July 1918

Second Battle of the Marne begins and was the last major German offensive on the Western Front during the First World War. Following the failure of the Spring Offensive to end the conflict, Erich Ludendorff, believed an attack through Flanders would give Germany a decisive victory over the British Expeditionary Force. To shield his intentions and draw Allied troops away from Belgium, Ludendorff planned for a large diversionary attack along the Marne. The battle began when 23 German divisions of the First and Third armies assaulted the French Fourth Army under Henri Gouraud east of Reims. The attack failed when an Allied counterattack, supported by several hundred tanks, overwhelmed the Germans on their right flank, inflicting severe casualties. The German defeat marked the start of the relentless Allied advance that culminated in the Armistice with Germany about 100 days later. (Images from the German Federal Archive)

Did you know?At the end of WWII the Japanese designed a wooden kamikaze glider (the Divine Dragon) to attack American ta...
07/14/2020

Did you know?

At the end of WWII the Japanese designed a wooden kamikaze glider (the Divine Dragon) to attack American tanks.

Did you know?

At the end of WWII the Japanese designed a wooden kamikaze glider (the Divine Dragon) to attack American tanks.

Today in Military History8 July 1760The Battle of Restigouche, a naval battle fought during the French and Indian War on...
07/09/2020

Today in Military History
8 July 1760

The Battle of Restigouche, a naval battle fought during the French and Indian War on the Restigouche River between the British Royal Navy and the small flotilla of vessels of the French Navy, Acadian militia and Mi’kmaq militias (totaling 1,500 fighters). The Acadians arrived in about 20 schooners and small boats.

The French vessels had been sent to relieve New France after the fall of Quebec. Supplies were extraordinarily important because France ran their colonies such that the colonies were wholly dependent on products and manufacturing of the motherland. The loss at this battle (all of the French vessels) and the consequent inability to supply the troops, marked the end of any serious attempt by France to keep hold of their colonies in North America, and it severely curtailed any hopes for a lengthy resistance to the British by the French forces that remained. The battle was the last major engagement of the Mi’kmaq and Acadian militias before the Burying of the Hatchet Ceremony between the Mi’kmaq and the British.

Today in Military History
8 July 1760

The Battle of Restigouche, a naval battle fought during the French and Indian War on the Restigouche River between the British Royal Navy and the small flotilla of vessels of the French Navy, Acadian militia and Mi’kmaq militias (totaling 1,500 fighters). The Acadians arrived in about 20 schooners and small boats.

The French vessels had been sent to relieve New France after the fall of Quebec. Supplies were extraordinarily important because France ran their colonies such that the colonies were wholly dependent on products and manufacturing of the motherland. The loss at this battle (all of the French vessels) and the consequent inability to supply the troops, marked the end of any serious attempt by France to keep hold of their colonies in North America, and it severely curtailed any hopes for a lengthy resistance to the British by the French forces that remained. The battle was the last major engagement of the Mi’kmaq and Acadian militias before the Burying of the Hatchet Ceremony between the Mi’kmaq and the British.

“In the summer of 1943, recoiling from defeat at Stalingrad, Hitler conducted a limited objective offensive to eliminate...
07/05/2020

“In the summer of 1943, recoiling from defeat at Stalingrad, Hitler conducted a limited objective offensive to eliminate the Soviet Kursk salient. Operating a classic pincer attack of the kind that succeeded during the 1942 Kharkov campaign he hoped that the resulting heavy losses inflicted on the Red Army would give the Wehrmacht time to recover its strength. However, the Soviet anticipation of the attack led to extensive losses on both sides as Soviet anti-tank mines and fierce fighting pushed the Germans back, liberating the German-held Orel in the process.

On the opening day of the Zitadelle offensive, the Germans made the mistake of using both battalions of Ferdinand tank destroyers to spearhead breakthrough attacks, even though the vehicle was totally unsuited for this role. Here a platoon of Ferdinands from Major Heinrich Steinwachs' Schwere Panzerjäger-Abteilung 653 are used in support of 292.infanterie-division's attack near Veselyi Berezhoi. “

Artwork by Steve Noon from CAM 272: Kursk 1943 by Robert Forczyk. Get your copy from the website now: https://bit.ly/2YUEUIV

In the summer of 1943, recoiling from defeat at Stalingrad, Hitler conducted a limited objective offensive to eliminate the Soviet Kursk salient. Operating a classic pincer attack of the kind that succeeded during the 1942 Kharkov campaign he hoped that the resulting heavy losses inflicted on the Red Army would give the Wehrmacht time to recover its strength. However, the Soviet anticipation of the attack led to extensive losses on both sides as Soviet anti-tank mines and fierce fighting pushed the Germans back, liberating the German-held Orel in the process.

On the opening day of the Zitadelle offensive, the Germans made the mistake of using both battalions of Ferdinand tank destroyers to spearhead breakthrough attacks, even though the vehicle was totally unsuited for this role. Here a platoon of Ferdinands from Major Heinrich Steinwachs' Schwere Panzerjäger-Abteilung 653 are used in support of 292.infanterie-division's attack near Veselyi Berezhoi.

Artwork by Steve Noon from CAM 272: Kursk 1943 by Robert Forczyk. Get your copy from the website now: https://bit.ly/2YUEUIV

This Day in History: Day 2 of the Battle of GettysburgUnion Col. Joshua Chamberlain and the 20th Maine were ordered to d...
07/03/2020

This Day in History: Day 2 of the Battle of Gettysburg
Union Col. Joshua Chamberlain and the 20th Maine were ordered to defend the left flank of the Federal line. Glory awaited them.

"Rush to the Summit" by Mort Künstler
Learn more: https://bit.ly/3is31X9

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