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11 Jan 1941The Afrika Korps is established. Adof Hitler orders forces to be prepared to enter North Africa to assist the...
01/11/2021

11 Jan 1941

The Afrika Korps is established. Adof Hitler orders forces to be prepared to enter North Africa to assist the Italian effort. Hitler’s first choice to command the DAK (Deutcshes Afrika Korps-German Afrika Korps) was Maj General Hans von Funk, a Prussian aristocrat, who’s negative report that Libya was lost led him to be dismissed. Hitler considered Lt Gen Erich von Manstein, who devised the invasion of France, but he was too valuable to the planning of Operation Barbarossa, the invasion of Russia. Hitler settled for Erwin Rommel. The beginning of the DAK was simply the 5th Light Division, but was doubled when a full panzer division arrived. Rommel would arrive in Tripoli on 12 February 1941.

(Photo Cred: German National Archives)

11 Jan 1941

The Afrika Korps is established. Adof Hitler orders forces to be prepared to enter North Africa to assist the Italian effort. Hitler’s first choice to command the DAK (Deutcshes Afrika Korps-German Afrika Korps) was Maj General Hans von Funk, a Prussian aristocrat, who’s negative report that Libya was lost led him to be dismissed. Hitler considered Lt Gen Erich von Manstein, who devised the invasion of France, but he was too valuable to the planning of Operation Barbarossa, the invasion of Russia. Hitler settled for Erwin Rommel. The beginning of the DAK was simply the 5th Light Division, but was doubled when a full panzer division arrived. Rommel would arrive in Tripoli on 12 February 1941.

(Photo Cred: German National Archives)

Today in 871, The Battle of Ashdown takes place, as Alfred the Great leads his brother’s army into battle against Viking...
01/08/2021

Today in 871, The Battle of Ashdown takes place, as Alfred the Great leads his brother’s army into battle against Viking invaders.
This illustration depicts a Viking warrior. This warrior is striking a blow with a hand-axe. His sword, an expensive item, connotes his high status. As a third weapon, he carries a seax, ideal for use at close quarters when there is no room to use a sword or axe effectively, or as a back-up weapon if his other weapons are lost or broken in combat.

The wearing of a mail shirt would have been restricted to wealthier warriors, and those who had looted such items from defeated enemies. His helmet has a spectacle-shaped face-plate protecting the eyes and nose, and a mail aventail protecting the back of his neck; this added to the helmet's weight, but did not significantly limit vision. His shield is leather-covered, with an additional leather rim sewn onto the boards. Together with the metal support struts on the back, this provides added support to stop the individual planks of the shield from springing apart under the force of repeated blows. Only the hand is protected with a metal boss. A strap allows the shield to be slung on the shoulder when not in use. The full pouch at his side also suggests wealth.

Today in 871, The Battle of Ashdown takes place, as Alfred the Great leads his brother’s army into battle against Viking invaders.

This illustration depicts a Viking warrior. This warrior is striking a blow with a hand-axe. His sword, an expensive item, connotes his high status. As a third weapon, he carries a seax, ideal for use at close quarters when there is no room to use a sword or axe effectively, or as a back-up weapon if his other weapons are lost or broken in combat.

The wearing of a mail shirt would have been restricted to wealthier warriors, and those who had looted such items from defeated enemies. His helmet has a spectacle-shaped face-plate protecting the eyes and nose, and a mail aventail protecting the back of his neck; this added to the helmet's weight, but did not significantly limit vision. His shield is leather-covered, with an additional leather rim sewn onto the boards. Together with the metal support struts on the back, this provides added support to stop the individual planks of the shield from springing apart under the force of repeated blows. Only the hand is protected with a metal boss. A strap allows the shield to be slung on the shoulder when not in use. The full pouch at his side also suggests wealth.

Artwork by Peter Dennis from CBT 27: Viking Warrior vs Anglo-Saxon Warrior, written by Gareth Williams. Get your copy here: https://bit.ly/3kvuxo0

ON THIS DAY: 6 JANUARY 1781The Battle of Jersey took place in the Channel Islands between British and French forces duri...
01/07/2021

ON THIS DAY: 6 JANUARY 1781

The Battle of Jersey took place in the Channel Islands between British and French forces during the American Revolutionary War.
As the largest Channel Island, France decided to invade Jersey to remove the threat the island posed to French and American shipping. 1,400 French troops landed, captured the capital of St Helier and forced the island's governor to surrender.
The British on the island were alerted and assembled 2,000 troops led by the 24-year old Major Francis Peirson. He led his troops in an attack on St Helier in a battle that lasted approximately 15 minutes. At the point of British victory, Peirson was killed by a musket shot but his men continued to win the battle.

The British lost 71 men killed and wounded compared to 158 French killed and wounded, including their commander Philippe Rullecourt who was mortally wounded. A further 600 French prisoners were captured while Jersey's governor was arrested and dismissed from service. Peirson was buried in the Parish Church of St Helier where a monument was later erected in his memory by the people of Jersey. His death was depicted by Anglo-American painter John Singleton Copley in a 1783 painting.

ON THIS DAY: 6 JANUARY 1781

The Battle of Jersey took place in the Channel Islands between British and French forces during the American Revolutionary War.

As the largest Channel Island, France decided to invade Jersey to remove the threat the island posed to French and American shipping. 1,400 French troops landed, captured the capital of St Helier and forced the island's governor to surrender.

The British on the island were alerted and assembled 2,000 troops led by the 24-year old Major Francis Peirson. He led his troops in an attack on St Helier in a battle that lasted approximately 15 minutes. At the point of British victory, Peirson was killed by a musket shot but his men continued to win the battle.

The British lost 71 men killed and wounded compared to 158 French killed and wounded, including their commander Philippe Rullecourt who was mortally wounded. A further 600 French prisoners were captured while Jersey's governor was arrested and dismissed from service. Peirson was buried in the Parish Church of St Helier where a monument was later erected in his memory by the people of Jersey. His death was depicted by Anglo-American painter John Singleton Copley in a 1783 painting.

Today in Military History6 January 1809 The Portuguese conquest of French Guiana was an 1809 military operation against ...
01/07/2021

Today in Military History
6 January 1809

The Portuguese conquest of French Guiana was an 1809 military operation against Cayenne, capital of the South American colony of French Guiana. Performed by a combined expeditionary force that included Portuguese (from Portugal and from Colonial Brazil) and British military contingents.

In exchange for providing troops and transports for the operation, the Portuguese were promised Guiana as an expansion of their holdings in Brazil. The British contribution consisted solely of the minor warship HMS Confiance. The ship had a highly effective crew and an experienced captain in James Lucas Yeo, who was to command the entire expedition. The Portuguese contingent consisted of 700 regular soldiers of the colonial Army of Brazil, 550 marines of the Royal Brigade of the Navy detached in Brazil and several warships to act as transports and provide offshore artillery support. The French defenders were weakened and could only muster 400 regular infantry and 800 unreliable militia, formed in part from the territory's free black population.

The town of Cayenne is situated on an island in the mouth of the Cayenne and Mahury Rivers. Protected by a series of forts and gun batteries, while the town itself was dominated by a modern star fort. Yeo decided to attack a series of outlying forts on the Mahury River in an effort to draw out the French defenders. On 6 January, Yeo launched an attack during the night, landing at Pointe Mahury at 03:00 on 7 January in five canoes despite the heavy rains and rough surf. Yeo detached a Portuguese force against the Dégras de Cannes battery while he advanced on Fort Diamant with a force of seamen and marines. Both positions were rapidly carried, the British suffering seven men wounded to French losses of six killed and four wounded. Four cannons were seized, as were 90 French soldiers. Over the next four days, Yeo's men took the surrender of the outlying French garrisons and units. Resistance was inconsistent and despite Cayenne's strong fortifications, the territory fell within a week. It is considered to be the baptism of fire of the Brazilian Marine Corps, as there was a participation of the Royal Brigade of the Navy that would give origin to it

Today in Military History
6 January 1809

The Portuguese conquest of French Guiana was an 1809 military operation against Cayenne, capital of the South American colony of French Guiana. Performed by a combined expeditionary force that included Portuguese (from Portugal and from Colonial Brazil) and British military contingents.

In exchange for providing troops and transports for the operation, the Portuguese were promised Guiana as an expansion of their holdings in Brazil. The British contribution consisted solely of the minor warship HMS Confiance. The ship had a highly effective crew and an experienced captain in James Lucas Yeo, who was to command the entire expedition. The Portuguese contingent consisted of 700 regular soldiers of the colonial Army of Brazil, 550 marines of the Royal Brigade of the Navy detached in Brazil and several warships to act as transports and provide offshore artillery support. The French defenders were weakened and could only muster 400 regular infantry and 800 unreliable militia, formed in part from the territory's free black population.

The town of Cayenne is situated on an island in the mouth of the Cayenne and Mahury Rivers. Protected by a series of forts and gun batteries, while the town itself was dominated by a modern star fort. Yeo decided to attack a series of outlying forts on the Mahury River in an effort to draw out the French defenders. On 6 January, Yeo launched an attack during the night, landing at Pointe Mahury at 03:00 on 7 January in five canoes despite the heavy rains and rough surf. Yeo detached a Portuguese force against the Dégras de Cannes battery while he advanced on Fort Diamant with a force of seamen and marines. Both positions were rapidly carried, the British suffering seven men wounded to French losses of six killed and four wounded. Four cannons were seized, as were 90 French soldiers. Over the next four days, Yeo's men took the surrender of the outlying French garrisons and units. Resistance was inconsistent and despite Cayenne's strong fortifications, the territory fell within a week. It is considered to be the baptism of fire of the Brazilian Marine Corps, as there was a participation of the Royal Brigade of the Navy that would give origin to it

The scene shows a moment during the battle of Princeton on 3 January 1777. Here a mixed force of British 17th Foot, ligh...
01/03/2021

The scene shows a moment during the battle of Princeton on 3 January 1777. Here a mixed force of British 17th Foot, light infantry and dismounted dragoons are breaking out of the tightening circle of Americans, which includes Philadelphia Associators, militia light infantry and a small group of Marines. Similar groups, including one led by Lt. Col. Mawhood, fought their way through the Americans and retreated.

Artwork by Graham Turner from CAM 203: Trenton and Princeton 1776–77, written by David Bonk

The scene shows a moment during the battle of Princeton on 3 January 1777. Here a mixed force of British 17th Foot, light infantry and dismounted dragoons are breaking out of the tightening circle of Americans, which includes Philadelphia Associators, militia light infantry and a small group of Marines. Similar groups, including one led by Lt. Col. Mawhood, fought their way through the Americans and retreated.

Artwork by Graham Turner from CAM 203: Trenton and Princeton 1776–77, written by David Bonk

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01/03/2021

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In late 1917 Lawrence and Lt. Col. Joyce experimented with a squadron of Rolls-Royce armoured cars by travelling across ...
01/01/2021

In late 1917 Lawrence and Lt. Col. Joyce experimented with a squadron of Rolls-Royce armoured cars by travelling across country towards the Hejaz Railway. On 1 January 1918, they carried out a series of attacks on Turkish blockhouses north of the important railway station at Mudawwarah. The armoured plating of the Rolls-Royce cars allowed them to approach Turkish positions with relative impunity. Lawrence would later describe this as ‘fighting deluxe’. Joyce is shown here in uniform with Arab headdress. Lawrence had long since adopted Arab robes for desert work.

Artwork by Peter Dennis from CAM 202: The Arab Revolt 1916–18 by David Murphy.

In late 1917 Lawrence and Lt. Col. Joyce experimented with a squadron of Rolls-Royce armoured cars by travelling across country towards the Hejaz Railway. On 1 January 1918, they carried out a series of attacks on Turkish blockhouses north of the important railway station at Mudawwarah. The armoured plating of the Rolls-Royce cars allowed them to approach Turkish positions with relative impunity. Lawrence would later describe this as ‘fighting deluxe’. Joyce is shown here in uniform with Arab headdress. Lawrence had long since adopted Arab robes for desert work.

Artwork by Peter Dennis from CAM 202: The Arab Revolt 1916–18 by David Murphy. Get your copy now: https://bit.ly/2UZ3kOX

Today in Military History30 December 1944 The US 8th Corps (part of US 3rd Army) launches attacks northward, against the...
12/30/2020

Today in Military History

30 December 1944

The US 8th Corps (part of US 3rd Army) launches attacks northward, against the German 5th Panzer Army, from a line between Bastogne and St. Hubert with Houffalize as the objective. Meanwhile, elements of German 5th Panzer Army launch another unsuccessful attempt at cutting the American corridor into Bastogne and capture the town.

Today in Military History
30 December 1944

The US 8th Corps (part of US 3rd Army) launches attacks northward, against the German 5th Panzer Army, from a line between Bastogne and St. Hubert with Houffalize as the objective. Meanwhile, elements of German 5th Panzer Army launch another unsuccessful attempt at cutting the American corridor into Bastogne and capture the town.

In December 1989, the United States Army spearheaded a carefully planned attack that overwhelmed the Panamanian Defense ...
12/30/2020

In December 1989, the United States Army spearheaded a carefully planned attack that overwhelmed the Panamanian Defense Forces (PDF) of dictator Manuel Noriega called Operation Just Cause.

Here, an enemy sniper has fired on US troops in Panama City. As a result, a US NCO with sniper training has grabbed an M21 sniping rifle. Paired with another soldier to act as a spotter, he has taken up a position in a room on one of the upper floors of a high-rise building to engage the sniper. The US sniper has only his pistol belt and Beretta M9, while the observer is armed with an M16 rifle. The sniper is using a pillow from a couch as an improvised rest and is firing from a kneeling position.

Artwork by Johnny Shumate from WPN 37: The M14 Battle Rifle by Leroy Thompson. Get your copy to read more: https://bit.ly/33cybMr

In December 1989, the United States Army spearheaded a carefully planned attack that overwhelmed the Panamanian Defense Forces (PDF) of dictator Manuel Noriega called Operation Just Cause.

Here, an enemy sniper has fired on US troops in Panama City. As a result, a US NCO with sniper training has grabbed an M21 sniping rifle. Paired with another soldier to act as a spotter, he has taken up a position in a room on one of the upper floors of a high-rise building to engage the sniper. The US sniper has only his pistol belt and Beretta M9, while the observer is armed with an M16 rifle. The sniper is using a pillow from a couch as an improvised rest and is firing from a kneeling position.

Artwork by Johnny Shumate from WPN 37: The M14 Battle Rifle by Leroy Thompson. Get your copy to read more: https://bit.ly/33cybMr

Today in Military History28 December 1964 South Vietnamese troops retake Binh Giã in a costly battle. The Viet Cong laun...
12/28/2020

Today in Military History

28 December 1964

South Vietnamese troops retake Binh Giã in a costly battle. The Viet Cong launched a major offensive on 4 December and took the village of Binh Giã, 40 miles southeast of Saigon. The South Vietnamese forces recaptured the village, but only after an eight-hour battle and three battalions of reinforcements brought in on helicopters. The operation continued into the first week of January. Losses included an estimated 200 South Vietnamese and five US advisors killed, plus 300 more South Vietnamese wounded or missing.

Photo: The Bình Giã victory monument dedicated to the Viet Cong, located in Châu Đức District, Bà Rịa–Vũng Tàu.

Today in Military History
28 December 1964

South Vietnamese troops retake Binh Giã in a costly battle. The Viet Cong launched a major offensive on 4 December and took the village of Binh Giã, 40 miles southeast of Saigon. The South Vietnamese forces recaptured the village, but only after an eight-hour battle and three battalions of reinforcements brought in on helicopters. The operation continued into the first week of January. Losses included an estimated 200 South Vietnamese and five US advisors killed, plus 300 more South Vietnamese wounded or missing.

Photo: The Bình Giã victory monument dedicated to the Viet Cong, located in Châu Đức District, Bà Rịa–Vũng Tàu.

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