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Social Research: An International Quarterly

Social Research: An International Quarterly Founded in 1934 by immigrant refugees. Carrying the torch of academic freedom and freedom of expression, and mapping the landscape of intellectual thought.

Most issues of Social Research address a single theme, which is addressed by scholars, writers, and experts from a wide range of disciplines. Some of these issues are the proceedings of our conference series; others are guest coedited by scholars who bring their unique expertise to bear on multifaceted explorations of the subjects of their interest. Some of our themes are explicitly drawn from the

Most issues of Social Research address a single theme, which is addressed by scholars, writers, and experts from a wide range of disciplines. Some of these issues are the proceedings of our conference series; others are guest coedited by scholars who bring their unique expertise to bear on multifaceted explorations of the subjects of their interest. Some of our themes are explicitly drawn from the

Ukraine Statement of Support by New University in Exile Consortium (founded by the Social Research Editor Arien Mack). P...
03/03/2022
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Ukraine Statement of Support by New University in Exile Consortium (founded by the Social Research Editor Arien Mack). Please sign and share.

Ukraine Statement of Support by New University in Exile Consortium

As Russia is hit with new economic sanctions this week, take another look at Nina Khrushcheva's analysis of the sanction...
03/01/2022
Project MUSE - Putin v. Purse Power: Confronting International Laws, Russian Style

As Russia is hit with new economic sanctions this week, take another look at Nina Khrushcheva's analysis of the sanctions after Vladimir Putin annexed Crimea in 2014.
https://muse.jhu.edu/article/610669

Since Russia annexed Crimea from Ukraine against international laws in 2014, the United States and European Union have imposed sanctions to punish Vladimir Putin’s Kremlin. The article addresses a debate as to whether these sanctions have been effective and argues that they have been. The seeming ...

Kathrin Wittler, Poetic Loneliness(vol. 88, no. 3, Fall 2021)https://muse.jhu.edu/article/845714"Since the Romantic era,...
02/28/2022

Kathrin Wittler, Poetic Loneliness
(vol. 88, no. 3, Fall 2021)
https://muse.jhu.edu/article/845714

"Since the Romantic era, the lyrical poem has epitomized the idea of poetic loneliness. While the alleged loneliness epidemic, considered a pervasive mental health problem in Western societies, brings to the fore solitude’s dangerous potential, poems such as Goethe’s “Wanderer’s Nightsong” and Cummings’s “l(a” attest to solitude’s aesthetic potential. Ambiguously based on the myth of the solitary genius standing out from the lonely crowd of alienated, other-directed persons, poems may give meaning to the state of psychosocial isolation. Reflecting solitude as a privation, poetic loneliness has the power to create virtual communities."

Matthew Wolfe and Eric Klinenberg, Towards a Theory of Social Repair(vol. 88, no. 3, Fall 2021)https://muse.jhu.edu/arti...
02/24/2022

Matthew Wolfe and Eric Klinenberg, Towards a Theory of Social Repair
(vol. 88, no. 3, Fall 2021)
https://muse.jhu.edu/article/845712

While many social networks were damaged during the COVID-19 pandemic, some groups were better equipped to reconstruct their networks. Though sociology has many words to describe the breaking of bonds, it has relatively few to describe their reconstitution. To fill this analytical gap, the authors offer the term “social repair,” which they define as the process by which threatened and broken social ties are restored and brought back to strength. They position this ability to mend broken ties as a previously unrecognized dimension of inequality.

Thomas L. Dumm, An End to Loneliness: The Politics of Grievance and the Rise of Neomedievalism(vol. 88, no. 3, Fall 2021...
02/21/2022

Thomas L. Dumm, An End to Loneliness: The Politics of Grievance and the Rise of Neomedievalism
(vol. 88, no. 3, Fall 2021)
https://muse.jhu.edu/article/845709

This article first describes how Americans attempted to grieve the loss of the first 400,000 Americans to die from COVID-19. It then discusses how Donald Trump, often described as a sociopath, may better be understood as a person unaffected by modernity: one who reflects and amplifies a growing inability in American political culture to properly grieve without turning to grievance. The author argues that the key to understanding Trump is to see him and the movement he leads as a product of the American public who no longer have the capacity to experience loneliness.

Gail Levin, Edward Hopper's Loneliness(vol. 88, no. 3, Fall 2021)https://muse.jhu.edu/article/845715"Evidence shows that...
02/17/2022

Gail Levin, Edward Hopper's Loneliness
(vol. 88, no. 3, Fall 2021)
https://muse.jhu.edu/article/845715

"Evidence shows that the 1918 influenza pandemic and 'social distancing' encouraged Hopper to abandon painting groups and concentrate on solitary figures or couples. Exploring why and how Hopper’s art elicits feelings of loneliness, this essay draws upon a comparison of his work with that of his acquaintance and contemporary, Theresa Bernstein ... Links also exist between Hopper’s art and fiction by William Faulkner and Sherwood Anderson."

Arthur Longworth, Solitary(vol. 88, no. 3, Fall 2021) https://muse.jhu.edu/article/845711“Solitary” is a depiction of th...
02/14/2022

Arthur Longworth, Solitary
(vol. 88, no. 3, Fall 2021)

https://muse.jhu.edu/article/845711
“Solitary” is a depiction of the brutal and humiliating daily existence of four men who have been relegated to long-term stays in solitary confinement in a Washington state supermax prison. This firsthand account by an award-winning author is a must-read.

Christian Sheppard, Take Me Out with the Crowd (vol. 88, no. 3, Fall 2021)https://muse.jhu.edu/article/845713"In The Ori...
02/07/2022

Christian Sheppard, Take Me Out with the Crowd
(vol. 88, no. 3, Fall 2021)
https://muse.jhu.edu/article/845713

"In The Origins of Totalitarianism, Hannah Arendt identifies loneliness as a precondition for the horrors of Hitler and Stalin.... Walter Benjamin recommends the flâneur ... as a model for living justly in modernity. But in free and traditionless America, where loneliness arises from creative destruction, being a baseball fan brings just balance to life and shows that the opposite of loneliness is happiness."

Arjun Appadurai, Loneliness Is No Longer What It Used to Be (vol. 88, no. 3, Fall 2021)https://muse.jhu.edu/article/8457...
01/31/2022

Arjun Appadurai, Loneliness Is No Longer What It Used to Be
(vol. 88, no. 3, Fall 2021)
https://muse.jhu.edu/article/845710

"Loneliness is a historical affect that emerges from a long history of religious, poetic, and sociological ideas about isolation, solitude, and existential angst.... Today, the experience of loneliness is dramatically affected by the need for social distancing and the use of social media. In these new circumstances, has the meaning of loneliness radically changed?"

On Thursday 3/11 at 12pm EST, Tishman Environment & Design Center's Joel Towers will be talking to Carol Browner, former...
03/10/2021
ONLINE | The United States Post-Election Webinar Series

On Thursday 3/11 at 12pm EST, Tishman Environment & Design Center's Joel Towers will be talking to Carol Browner, former Director of the Obama White House Office of Energy & Climate, in the penultimate discussion in our webinar series 'The US Post-Trump.' They will be discussing the unique challenges facing the Biden administrations today, as it relates to climate change.

Carol Browner currently serves as a Distinguished Senior Fellow at the Center for American Progress and is a member of President Biden's Campaign Climate Engagement Advisory Council. Find more information about the event and register at https://bit.ly/3bsHlro

A Social Research--Center for Public ScholarshipWebinar SeriesThe United States faces a range of challenges at the start of the new administration. Join us as we engage leading experts in a series of discussions about some of the key issues facing the country: ◆US Security ◆Borders & Migration...

On Thursday 2/25 at 12:30pm EST, New School faculty Jessica Pisano will be talking to former FBI Deputy Director Andrew ...
02/24/2021
ONLINE | The United States Post-Trump Webinar Series

On Thursday 2/25 at 12:30pm EST, New School faculty Jessica Pisano will be talking to former FBI Deputy Director Andrew McCabe on the wide range of challenges facing the Biden administration when it comes to national security.

Andrew McCabe served as FBI's Deputy Director from 2016-18, and currently serves as Distinguished Visiting Professor at George Mason University.

The webinar on 'US Security' is the first of four discussions as part of the webinar series "The United States Post-Trump." You can find more info on these, and register for each at the link below.

https://t.co/3g18zizMY2?amp=1

A Social Research--Center for Public ScholarshipWebinar SeriesThe United States faces a range of challenges at the start of the new administration. Join us as we engage leading experts in a series of discussions about some of the key issues facing the country: ◆US Security ◆Borders & Migration...

“The discovery of social, cultural, and religious pluralism by ancient empires and modern global conquests helped genera...
09/28/2020
Project MUSE - On Illuminating Darkness

“The discovery of social, cultural, and religious pluralism by ancient empires and modern global conquests helped generate a sense of common humanity, the idea that, despite many differences, others are more like us than not, that we thus owe each other a threshold level of neighborliness. And yet, divisions between "us" and "them"—divisions of faith, geography, and hierarchy—became ever more profound, often cruel and dangerous, precisely as ideas about human fellowship advanced. Propinquity and distance, regard and loathing, have coincided.”

In his paper “On Illuminating Darkness,” #SocResAuthor Ira Katznelson mourns the irony at work in modern times where people, much like us, can slaughter others they know by face and name. He asks, “which circumstances of social geography, material arrangements, and cultural and political patterns raise prospects for toleration rather than persecution?”

Read his ruminations about religious pluralism and toleration in our issue “Political Transition Revisited”: https://muse.jhu.edu/article/726001

soon after the world trade center towers came down, the leaders of the Jewish Theological Seminary sought to offer comfort and consolation. In their statement, they recalled that before the destruction of the Temple in Jerusalem by the Romans in AD 70, the high priest would pray on behalf of those a...

What are Iranians dreaming about today? A question that our author Kian Tajbakhsh asks in our issue “Political Transitio...
09/28/2020
Project MUSE - What Are Iranians Dreaming about Today? Reflections on the Islamic Revolution at 40

What are Iranians dreaming about today? A question that our author Kian Tajbakhsh asks in our issue “Political Transitions Revisited,” and offers possibilities that address the concerns of three specific groups in Iran. In focusing on Islamists, Islamic reformers, and modernists, Tajbakhsh writes that “each group advances a distinct interpretation of the existing political regime.” The views of these three groups dominate Iranian politics today and in that sense are the choices that citizens confront when attempting to envision a political future for their country.

Islamists, or velayi, are the current ruling strata in Iran; their idea of a perfect future is already being realized in today’s Islamic Republic of Iran (IRI) that successfully combines clerical rule with managed popular participation.

The Islamic reformers aspire to create a “religious democracy” wherein the country’s uniquely Islamic culture integrates with a few Western human rights perspectives. Through this combination, they hope to “fashion a nontyrannical but nonliberal government.”

The modernists, on the other hand, are a secular bunch who espouse Western liberalism and the creation of a constitutional republic that is “shorn of all clerical and religious official dispensations.”

Tajbakhsh goes into further details about the political reality that each group tries to advance in his paper “What Are Iranian Dreaming About Today?: Reflections on the Islamic Revolution at 40”: https://muse.jhu.edu/article/725998

almost 20 years ago, i published an article in this journal under the title "Political Decentralization and the Creation of Local Government in Iran: Consolidation or Transformation of the Theocratic State?" (Tajbakhsh 2000). The establishment of an elected local government in every city and village...

Angela Merkel faced much opposition when she made the decision to welcome refugees during the 2015 crisis. 5 years later...
09/15/2020
Vol. 84, No. 1 (Spring 2017)

Angela Merkel faced much opposition when she made the decision to welcome refugees during the 2015 crisis. 5 years later, her decision has paid off, with reportedly 1.2 million refugees successfully integrated into German society. The other European Union member states did not have a similar policy towards refugees. On the contrary, many re-bordered by instituting checkpoints between themselves and neighbouring countries.

In “The Politics of Pests: Immigration and the Invasive Other,” Social Research author Bridget Anderson writes about the media coverage of the refugee crisis and its consequences on public opinion and policy. Portrayals of migrants in the European media, particularly as “invasive insects,” offer insights into the nature of popular anxieties about the foreigner.

Anderson’s article discusses the ramifications of such metaphoric tropes in our issue “The Invasive Other”: https://bit.ly/3fksuiD

THE INVASIVE OTHER Miriam Ticktin, Guest Coeditor Arien Mack, Journal Editor (Click for related issues and articles) Table of Contents Ebby Abramson Endangered

The growing conflict between science and politics in the United States has created a chasm between scientists, policy-ma...
09/12/2020
POLITICS AND SCIENCE How Their Interplay Results in Public Policy / V

The growing conflict between science and politics in the United States has created a chasm between scientists, policy-makers, and government officials that has been difficult to suture. The effects have ranged from large scale climate denial to a slowdown of stemcell and healthcare research. The ongoing election campaigns further reveal the increasingly partisan nature of these topics.

In his introduction to our issue “Politics and Science: How Their Interplay Results in Public Policy,” Gerald Holton asks if “the balance of power among the various interests that play a role in determining public policy has changed? What are the consequences of these changes? What lessons can be learned from past successes and failures in public policy?” Our authors explore these questions as they relate to environmental and healthcare science.

In “The Politics of Healthcare,” M. Joycelyn Elders writes that “politics and healthcare are strangely entangled with little regard for the healthy outcome of the populace,” creating multiple complex crises and diminishing access to affordable healthcare in the United States.

In “Environmental Science Input to Public Policy” Paul R Ehrlich laments the many egregious examples “where the inputs of science to environmental policy have been given too little weight or were totally overwhelmed by other input.” The lack of population policy is possibly the worst of this, where a dense human population has already been pushed into “closer contact with animal reservoirs of novel infectious diseases.”

Read more from this revelatory issue:

https://bit.ly/2R1Uy0E

Arien Mack, Editor Table of Contents Arien MackEditor’s IntroductionCurrent events seem designed to make the subjects of “Politics and Science” increasingly re

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In 1933, the New School’s first president, Alvin Johnson, with support from philanthropist Hiram Halle and the Rockefeller Foundation, initiated an historic effort to rescue endangered scholars from the shadow of Na**sm in Europe at the brink of WW II. These refugees became the founding scholars of “The University in Exile,” and constituted what became known as the Graduate Faculty of Political and Social Science, now known as The New School for Social Research. Social Research: An International Quarterly of the Political and Social Sciences was launched in 1934 by these scholars, who held the deep conviction that every true university must have its own distinct public voice. Read Alvin Johnson’s introduction to our first issue. In the years since, Social Research has matured into one of the oldest and most influential journals in the United States. Papers by authors from around the globe have reached our readers in nearly 100 countries, and our audience continues to grow. Articles and complete back issues are regularly used as classroom texts across the United States. More than 250 articles from our pages have been translated or reprinted in books and journals all over the world, and our special conference issues are award winners.

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In 1933, the New School’s first president, Alvin Johnson, with support from philanthropist Hiram Halle and the Rockefeller Foundation, initiated an historic effort to rescue endangered scholars from the shadow of Na**sm in Europe at the brink of WWII. These refugees became the founding scholars of “The University in Exile,” and constituted what became known as the Graduate Faculty of Political and Social Science, now known as The New School for Social Research. Social Research: An International Quarterly of the Political and Social Sciences was launched in 1934 by these scholars, who held the deep conviction that every true university must have its own distinct public voice. Read Alvin Johnson’s introduction to our first issue: http://www.socres.org/vol01/issue0101.htm

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The latest from Social Research: An International Quarterly is a special issue on the shifting political climate in Turkey. Read "Social Justice, Conflict, and Protest in Turkey: The Kurdish Issue and LGBTI+Activism" from Hakan Sandal-Wilson, now available subscription free on Project MUSE: https://bit.ly/31OgrsF
#OTD in 1962, President John F. Kennedy was shown photographs of Soviet nuclear missile installations under construction in Cuba, setting off the Cuban missile crisis. Read "A Long Legacy of Distrust and the Future of Cuban-US Relations" from Philip Brenner and Teresa García Castro in Social Research: An International Quarterly: https://bit.ly/2YYnNsJ
Where have all the commons gone? Prabhat Patnaik explores "Commons, Commodities, and Capitalism" in the latest issue of Social Research: An International Quarterly. Read now, subscription free, on Project MUSE: https://bit.ly/3wgXeJM
Happy Birthday to late night host and comedian Stephen Colbert. Colbert's "border-crossing political satire" is examined in this 2012 piece in the journal Social Research: An International Quarterly. Read "Mr. Stewart and Mr. Colbert Go to Washington: Television Satirists Outside the Box", now freely available on Project MUSE: https://bit.ly/3tIEbqD
"If my thinking about the anatomy of an apology is correct, then the myriad apologies being tendered these days by individuals and institutions, including the government’s apology for slavery, are woefully inadequate." Roy L. Brooks discusses the elements of a genuine apology in the lastest issue of Social Research: An International Quarterly. Read now on Project MUSE: https://bit.ly/3vhQAmt
New Podcast Episode: "Social Research: In the time of Plague" JHUP is joined by Social Research: An International Quarterly Editor Dr. Arien Mack for a conversation about the journal's special Covid-19 issue, which revisits their 1988 AIDS response: https://bit.ly/3mGlvoy #podcast #covid19 #AIDS
"Comedy is not always nice; it’s not always funny; and sometimes it’s more ribald than rational." - Ronald K. L. Collins in "Comedy and Liberty: The Life and Legacy of Lenny Bruce" from Social Research: An International Quarterly: https://bit.ly/2Gnxhoc
Are we too busy to be engaged citizens? William E. Scheuerman discusses the pace of modern life's effect on democracy in the journal Social Research: An International Quarterly : https://bit.ly/3ltBPcn
Today's #EditorsPick comes from Social Research: An International Quarterly: "Hannah Arendt's work is at the heart of Social Research's dedication to the inseparability of theory and lived experience. Her literary trustee, Jerome Kohn, is a masterful prose writer whose political philosophical insights are infused with an unmatched literary sensibility - - whether he is editing Arendt's work or explicating it in a variety of contexts." - Editor Cara Schlesinger https://bit.ly/3bIxnjO
"Political Transitions Revisited," the Spring 2019 issue from Social Research: An International Quarterly features work on worldwide democratic challenges from authors including Jerome Cohen, Kian Tajbakhsh, Nermin Allam, Sam Greene and Agnes Heller. The 16 articles cover Hungary, China, South Africa and more. http://ow.ly/NX2V50v60Bw
In April 2018, Social Research: An International Quarterly held its 37th Conference at The New School. a collaboration with the Society of Fellows and the Heyman Center for the Humanities at Columbia University, the conference examined "Cons and Scams: Their Place in American Culture." Like other conferences hosted by the journal, the presenters also wrote a paper for a special issue of the journal, which was published as the Winter 2018 issue. Editor Arien Mack said this topic - which has a rich history - fit seamlessly into the time because "this is perhaps the first time we have had a US president whom some have called a con artist." Mack joined us for a Q&A about the issue. https://www.press.jhu.edu/news/blog/american-cons-and-scams?utm_medium=social&utm_source=facebook&utm_campaign=sorscam&utm_content=jhup
Cons and con men have long been present in American culture, from Bernie Madoff to Trump University, street-corner crooks offering three-card monte to big-time art forgers. Read more in the latest issue of Social Research: An International Quarterly, building off of the Center for Public Scholarship's 2018 conference. https://www.socres.org/single-post/854-winter-2018-cons-and-scams