Art Tribal Newsletter

Art Tribal Newsletter The ONLY monthly printed publication that focuses on the tribal art market and delivers in depth coverage of events, exhibitions, auctions and legalities.

In Guatemala, the Maya world untouched for centuries
09/26/2020
In Guatemala, the Maya world untouched for centuries

In Guatemala, the Maya world untouched for centuries

Archaeologists have suspected there was more to Tikal, El Zotz and Holmul. But it wasn’t until recently that proof came – in the form of Lidar, a type of remote sensing technology.

06/02/2020

#blacklivesmatter

Archaeological breakthrough finds rare 'once in a lifetime' stencilled rock art
05/29/2020
Archaeological breakthrough finds rare 'once in a lifetime' stencilled rock art

Archaeological breakthrough finds rare 'once in a lifetime' stencilled rock art

A team of Australian archaeologists find some of the world's rarest examples of rock art at Limmen National Park in the Northern Territory. The miniature stencils are only one of three such examples of small-scale rock art known around the world.

🔥Act now: Stop ID2020
04/07/2020
🔥Act now: Stop ID2020

🔥Act now: Stop ID2020

Let’s get to 9403 signatures by the end of today - can you add yours?

https://www.1stdibs.com/introspective-magazine/peggy-guggenheim-loved-modernism-but-she-also-collected-tribal-art/?email...
03/30/2020
Peggy Guggenheim Loved Modernism, but She Also Collected Tribal Art

https://www.1stdibs.com/introspective-magazine/peggy-guggenheim-loved-modernism-but-she-also-collected-tribal-art/?emailToken=6694702_2c898efa1d712c42883fb3ed609f8f88b4545b9bb006358a40eba4b7215550ce

In 1951, the storied heiress-turned-art-patron Peggy Guggenheim opened her palazzo on Venice’s Grand Canal to the public from Easter to early fall. For three days a week, strangers could stroll through rooms full of Pablo Picassos and Jackson Pollocks while she went about her daily business inside...

David A. Cassera - Arts of Africa, Oceania and the Americas
03/18/2020

David A. Cassera - Arts of Africa, Oceania and the Americas

Downtime in the gallery photographing objects

http://exhibitions.psu.edu/s/african-brilliance/page/welcome
03/12/2020
Welcome · Omeka S

http://exhibitions.psu.edu/s/african-brilliance/page/welcome

This digital catalogue, the first of its kind at Penn State, was produced in conjunction with the exhibition African Brilliance: A Diplomat’s Sixty Years of Collecting, organized by the Palmer Museum of Art and on view at the museum February 8 through May 24, 2020. The exhibition presents a survey...

01/30/2020
The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York

The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York

Now on view! ✨ From the first millennium, the western #Sahel—a vast region in Africa just south of the Sahara Desert spanning today's Senegal, Mali, Mauritania, and Niger—was the birthplace of a succession of influential states.⁣ ⁣⁣⁣
⁣⁣⁣
Fueled by a network of global trade routes, the empires of Ghana (300–1200), Mali (1230–1600), Songhay (1464–1591), and Segu (1640–1861) cultivated an enormously rich material culture. 🌍 ⁣⁣⁣
⁣⁣⁣⁣
See more than 200 objects—including exquisite loans from the region's national collections—in the first exhibition of its kind to trace the legacy of those mighty states and what they produced in the visual arts. ⁣

Visit "Sahel: Art and Empires on the Shores of the Sahara" now through May 10. Learn more at met.org/Sahel. #MetSahel⁣

Seizure of thirty art and archaeological objects at the Brafa
01/29/2020
Seizure of thirty art and archaeological objects at the Brafa

Seizure of thirty art and archaeological objects at the Brafa

The services of the Federal Public Service Economy, Customs and Interpol carried out checks on several Brafa stands. Objects were seized. Pierre Dartevelle, who opened the first gallery specializin…

Cassera Gallery at Designs NW Architects
01/15/2020

Cassera Gallery at Designs NW Architects

Cassera Gallery South 1 Year Anniversary and Holiday Art Show. Photos: by Jesse Childress

12/24/2019
RIP
09/30/2019

RIP

See you in Paris #parcoursdesmondes2019
09/07/2019

See you in Paris #parcoursdesmondes2019

08/27/2019
Isabelle Mark

Isabelle Mark

“How many more of us must die before the world helps us?” 💔 This breaks my heart. #FreeWestPapua 🙏🏾

For sale: 2 for the price of 1 - Yaka Masks with custom stands. $800 for both.
08/26/2019

For sale: 2 for the price of 1 - Yaka Masks with custom stands. $800 for both.

"There are practically no dealers in New York any more, which is pretty astonishing. As a result, many American collecti...
08/13/2019
A break in the tribal art market

"There are practically no dealers in New York any more, which is pretty astonishing. As a result, many American collections are presented in Paris because their owners believe they sell better here," says Jean-Claude Binoche.

seems to be running out of steam. What lies behind this stagnation, and is it a…

Northwest Coast Ceremonial LadelOrigin: Tlingit or Haida Peoples, British Columbia, CanadaCirca: Late 19th to Early 20th...
07/30/2019

Northwest Coast Ceremonial Ladel
Origin: Tlingit or Haida Peoples, British Columbia, Canada
Circa: Late 19th to Early 20th Century
Materials: Sheep and Goat Horn, copper rivets
Price on Request

A wonderful and large carved ladel from the First Nations people of the Northwest Coast. The totemic handle is carved out of mountain goat horn and fastened to the bowl which is carved out of big horn sheep horn and fastend together with copper rivets.

Ladles and spoons were used to transfer food from serving containers to dishes and to eat with. Ladles were elegantly plain or might have handles embellished with an ancestral figure or a crest design. Antler spoons with crest figures on the handle from 3,000 years ago have appeared on the mainland at the Musqueam northeast site near the mouth of the Fraser River, and mountain goat horn cores for spoon handles from 4,000 years ago were found in the Prince Rupert middens. Unfortunately, there are no prehistoric examples of horn spoons from Haida sites, but it is likely that they acquired such spoons from mainland groups as part of the intertribal potlatch system. Individual horn spoons were the most elaborately decorated items at a feast. The bowl of the spoon was made from cream-coloured mountain sheep horn, steamed and bent in a mould. The curved handles were made from black mountain goat horn that provided a field for artistic display second only to that of totem poles. In fact, many spoon handles were faithful replicas of the poles in front of their owners' houses. Some of the most elaborate spoon handles have a dozen or more diminutive figures writhing around and seeming to devour each other on a handle that rarely exceeded 15 cm (6 inches) in length. Thousands of these exquisite works survive in museums. Some foods, like soapberries (or Indian ice cream), required special eating utensils. Spoons for eating whipped soapberries were shaped like miniature paddles, which people used to literally shovel the delicacy into their mouths. - Canadian Museum of Civilizations.

07/11/2019
Daniel Hourdé

Our friend Daniel Hourdé.

[PRESSE]

Un beau reportage diffusé sur BFMTV dans Chercheurs d'art, par Olivier de Rincquesen

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