Alfred I. duPont Awards

Alfred I. duPont Awards The Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University Awards honor excellence in broadcast & digital journalism. Administered by Columbia's Graduate School of Journalism, the duPont Awards are one of the most prestigious broadcast awards.

www.dupontawards.org The duPont-Columbia Awards bring the best in broadcast and digital journalism to professional and public attention and honor those who produce it. The duPont Awards engender a collective spirit for the industry and inform the public of the contributions news organizations make to their communities and to the world. The awards program also supports journalism education and hosts events about reporting the news today. Winners of the Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University Awards receive gold or silver batons designed by the late American architect Louis I. Kahn.

www.dupontawards.org The duPont-Columbia Awards bring the best in broadcast and digital journalism to professional and public attention and honor those who produce it. The duPont Awards engender a collective spirit for the industry and inform the public of the contributions news organizations make to their communities and to the world. The awards program also supports journalism education and hosts events about reporting the news today. Winners of the Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University Awards receive gold or silver batons designed by the late American architect Louis I. Kahn.

Mission: The purpose of the Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University Awards is to bring the best in broadcast and digital journalism to professional and public attention and to honor those who produce it.

07/15/2020
duPont Winning Doc Series Eyes on the Prize an Enduring Landmark Broadcast

In 1988 “Eyes on the Prize: America's Civil Rights Years, 1954-1965” won a duPont gold baton - a special award given for exemplary, comprehensive bodies of programming. The series from PBS station WGBH was a six-part broadcast built on archival footage that told the story of the men and women who marched, protested, and fought for civil rights during the 1950s and 60s.

Eyes on the Prize was the culmination of decades of work and stands, over thirty years later, as an enduring landmark broadcast. The series showed the visceral challenges faced during the struggle for basic rights: men and women turned away by armed deputies when trying to register to vote, peaceful activists beaten and scorned at lunch counters, and more.

At the time the series was broadcast, the fight for civil rights in the United States was far from over. The definitive story of our present national reckoning may not be told for many years to come. However, if you’ve done reporting you’re proud of on the contemporary movements for racial equity and justice, the duPont awards are open for submissions, but only until 11:59pm TONIGHT! Visit duPont.org for more info and to submit. #duPont2021.

07/15/2020
Multiple duPont Winner Ira Glass on the Practical Advantages of Winning a duPont

“It helps you convince your bosses to take a risk the next time you want to do something that’s going to take a lot of time and money.” - Multi-year duPont winner Ira Glass

This American Life has won multiple duPont Awards. To name a few: In 2014, for the two part series “Harper High School” which spent a year exploring the impact of gun violence on the students and staff of a Chicago high school. In 2016, for the groundbreaking first season of the investigative podcast Serial. Most recently, in 2019, for a two part series that told the story of an Alabama town with an ever-growing immigrant population.

Have you done investigative radio or podcast work? Submissions for the 2021 duPont-Columbia Awards close TONIGHT at 11:59pm. Visit duPont.org for more information and to submit. #duPont2021

07/14/2020
2020 duPont Awards Host Christiane Amanpour on the Award's Importance

"The duPont Award is for us in terms of broadcast like the Pulitzer is for print."
2020 duPont host, and multiple duPont winner, Christiane Amanpour.

Amanpour won a duPont silver baton in 1994 for her on-the-ground coverage of ethnic cleansing in Bosnia. She won again in 2009 for a six-part series "God's Warriors" about the global rise of religious extremism.

Have you done exemplary international reporting? Submissions for the 2021 awards close TONIGHT at 11:59pm. Visit duPont.org for more info and to submit. #duPont2021

07/14/2020
duPont 2021 Submission Deadline TONIGHT

Today is the LAST DAY to submit work for the 2021 duPont-Columbia Awards. Visit duPont.org for more information and to submit. The EXTENDED deadline is 11:59pm July 14. Eligibility has also been extended. Work appearing after July 1 and on or before July 14 is eligible.

Read more about why we took the extraordinary step of extending our deadline in this statement from duPont Awards director, Lisa R. Cohen: https://news.columbia.edu/news/duponts-journalists-covid-deadline-extension

"As the director of [the duPont] awards, which are presented for outstanding audio and video journalism, I know the obst...
07/14/2020

"As the director of [the duPont] awards, which are presented for outstanding audio and video journalism, I know the obstacles that these journalists face. As a former network news producer, I’ve experienced some of them myself. So our mission, to celebrate the important work they do and to recognize publicly the price these courageous men and women pay, has never felt more essential."

- Lisa R. Cohen, Director of the duPont-Columbia Awards, on why the duPont Awards have taken the extraordinary step of extending our submission deadline.

Read the rest of her message, here: https://news.columbia.edu/news/duponts-journalists-covid-deadline-extension

The duPont-Columbia Awards have EXTENDED the submission deadline to JULY 14 at 11:59pm. The eligibility period has also been extended to include work appearing after July 1 and on or before July 14. Visit duPont.org for more information and to submit.

07/13/2020
2010 duPont Winner Katie Couric on the Meaning of the Award

“To be given this award is a validation of pure journalism.”
- 2010 duPont winner Katie Couric.

Couric won a silver baton for her series of now-legendary interviews with then-Vice Presidential candidate Sarah Palin. Presenting the award to Couric, the late Gwen Eiffel said they were “the kind of interviews that make any broadcaster think ‘I wish I’d asked that question just that way.’”

Have you done local, national, or international political reporting with an impact? Submissions for the 2021 duPonts close soon! Visit duPont.org and submit by 11:59pm July 14. The eligibility deadline has also been extended to include work done after July 1 and on or before July 14.

07/13/2020
duPont Winning Series "The African Americans: Many Rivers to Cross" Re-frames American History

Have you done reporting that reframes accepted historical narratives? The duPont awards have EXTENDED the submission deadline to July 14! Visit duPont.org for more information and to submit.

In 2015, Professor Henry Louis Gates, Jr. won a duPont award for his sweeping six-part PBS documentary series, “The African Americans: Many Rivers to Cross.” The series began with the origins of slavery in Africa over 500 years ago and drew an historical throughline to the present day. One of the central questions the series addressed was why a country, at the time led by a Black president, remained so deeply divided by race.

Much like the #1619Project from The New York Times, the series showed a view of American history centered on the Black experience. One especially wrenching part of the series addressed the fact that the United States was the only so-called new world country in which the enslaved population grew over time. 400,000 people were imported from Africa, but the enslaved population was almost 4 million by the time of the civil war. The series also touched on more contemporary phenomena, like the rise of the Black Panther Party as a response to police harassment.

All episodes of “The African Americans: Many Rivers to Cross” are available to stream along with digital extras from the series: https://www.pbs.org/wnet/african-americans-many-rivers-to-cross/video/

07/12/2020
2020 duPont Winners Lindsey Seavert and Ben Garvin on the Meaning of their Win

“The duPonts really ground us in that boots on the ground journalism.”
2020 duPont-Columbia award-winner Lindsey Seavert Kare.

Have you done impactful education reporting or made a deeply reported documentary? The duPont awards have EXTENDED the submission deadline for the 2021 awards to July 14! Eligibility has also been extended to include work appearing after July 1 and on or before July 14. Visit duPont.org for more information and to enter. #duPont2021

Lindsey Seavert and Ben Garvin won a 2020 duPont award for their documentary Love Them First: Lessons from Lucy Laney Elementary. The film told the story of a year at a struggling Minneapolis elementary school, exploring issues of race and poverty. It also profiled the school’s exceptional principal, Mauri Friestleben whose personal history informs her dedication to her students. Principal Friestleben even traveled to New York with Lindsey, Ben, and the team from @KARE 11 to accept the duPont silver baton. While in New York she also appeared on the Today show. This was KARE 11’s first feature length documentary.

For the FRONTLINE | PBS documentary “Policing the Police” Columbia Journalism Professor and The New Yorker Staff Writer ...
07/12/2020

For the FRONTLINE | PBS documentary “Policing the Police” Columbia Journalism Professor and The New Yorker Staff Writer William Jelani Cobb embedded with the Newark, New Jersey Police Department. During his time he saw firsthand the challenges the department faced and the culture of the officers.

In the latest episode of the #OnAssignmentPodcast, we revisit a conversation with Cobb in which he reveals what he found most disturbing about his time with the police and shares his insights on the challenges facing the city of Newark that are so complex he says “they can’t police their way out.” In conversation with Columbia Journalism Professor Betsy West, Cobb and the film’s producer James Jacoby discuss how they gained access to the department, what they had to leave on the cutting room floor, and all the work that went on off camera submitting public records requests and conducting contextual research

Listen to the full episode, here: https://bit.ly/PolicingthePolice

07/12/2020
2014 duPont Winner "The Barber of Birmingham" Shows the Power of Everyday Activists

Have you done meaningful reporting on movements for social change and racial justice? The duPont awards have EXTENDED the submission deadline for the 2021 awards to July 14! Visit duPont.org for more information and to submit. #duPont2021

In 2014, the documentary “The Barber of Birmingham: Foot Soldier of the Civil Rights Movement” won a duPont-Columbia award. The film told the story of James Armstrong and highlighted other men and women who risked their lives and livelihoods for social change. These men and women are not often remembered in history books, but they are the ordinary citizens whose tireless, courageous work ensured meaningful change.

In one powerful section of the film, Armstrong and others reminisce about the questions they were asked by registrars when they attempted to register to vote. Restrictions on Black voting were a reaction to the passage of the 15th Amendment in 1870. They remained in place in many southern states until the passage of the Voting Rights Act in 1965. One woman, Amelia Boynton Robinson, who was 97 when “The Barber of Birmingham” was made, recounted the obstacles to registration: “You have to have property, a clean record, you have to know the constitution, and you have to have two white men...to vouch for you.”

Armstrong, who carried the American flag at the head of the famous march from Selma to Montgomery in 1965 on what became known as Bloody Sunday, said of his involvement with the Civil Rights Movement: “The worst thing a man can do is live for nothing. I want to live for a purpose.” Armstrong carried the flag across the Edmund Pettus Bridge every year on the anniversary of Bloody Sunday. Those who were with Armstrong in 1965 often commented that, despite the brutal violence unleashed on the peaceful marchers by armed police, “He never let that flag hit the ground.”

Armstrong was jailed during the civil rights movement, but lived long enough to vote for Barack Obama and to see him elected president. Sadly, Armstrong died before Obama’s inauguration.
Since the film was made, the protections of the Voting Rights Act were gutted by the Supreme Court in 2013, and a new era of social change has arisen focused on racial justice and police reform. The Black Lives Matter movement contains many dedicated activists like Armstrong.

Watch “The Barber of Birmingham: Foot Soldier of the Civil Rights Movement” here: http://www.pbs.org/pov/watch/barber/video-the-barber-of-birmingham/

07/11/2020
CNN's Nic Robertson on Journalist's Responsibility as Witnesses

“That price is to...open the window for the audience...so they can understand the world around them.” - Nic Robertson of CNN on the responsibility of journalists to communicate what they witness.

Robertson, along with Clarissa Ward, won a 2020 duPont-Columbia award for @CNN’s coverage of the murder of Jamal #Khashoggi. The international team of CNN correspondents conducted collaborative reporting that continually broke stories revealing new elements to the story of Khashoggi’s death - such as the use of a body double and the extent of the Saudi government’s involvement.

The deadline to submit for the 2021 duPont awards has been EXTENDED! Visit duPont.org by July 14 to enter work. #duPont2021

07/11/2020
duPont Winner Ailsa Chang of WNYC Reports on Alleged Illegal Searches by NYPD

Have you done reporting on the police that produced results? The duPont-Columbia awards have extended our submission deadline to July 14! The eligibility period has also been extended for programming that appears after July 1 and on or before July 14. Visit duPont.org for more information and to submit. Visit duPont.org for more information and to submit. #duPont2021

In 2012, Ailsa Chang of WNYC won a duPont award for her series “Alleged Illegal Searches” which investigated marijuana arrests and their connection to illegal searches by the NYPD.

At the time of her reports, possession of small amounts of marijuana not in public view and not being smoked was not a crime, but a violation which would result in a ticket and fine. Chang began investigating marijuana arrest when she realized the majority of arrests were happening in neighborhoods that were heavily policed - where residents should theoretically know better than to have marijuana in public view. In the course of her reporting she spoke to current and former police officers, dozens of young people searched by the police, and with prosecutors and defense attorneys. Her interviews showed that the NYPD was using “stop and frisk” laws to conduct searches.

One young man profiled in “Alleged Illegal Searches by NYPD” described having marijuana taken from his pocket by an officer when he was stopped, frisked, and searched without consent. He was then charged with the crime of having marijuana in public view. In the two episodes of “Alleged Illegal Searches” lawyers also speak to the common practice of these searches.

Chang’s reporting also spotlighted racial disparities in marijuana arrests. Black and Latino New Yorkers were more likely to be arrested for marijuana. After these reports aired, legislators in New York introduced a bill to disincentivise aggressive searches by police.

Listen to part one of “Alleged Illegal Searches by NYPD” here: https://www.wnyc.org/story/126232-marijuana-arrests/
Listen to part two of “Alleged Illegal Searches by NYPD” here: https://www.wnyc.org/story/126530-alleged-illegal-searches/

07/10/2020
WNYC Investigates NYPD (Mis)use of Force in duPont Winning Series

Have you done deep reporting on police misconduct? The duPont awards have EXTENDED their submission deadline to July 14. The eligibility period has also been extended for programming that appears after July 1 and on or before July 14. Visit duPont.org for more information and to submit.

On July 14, 2014, Eric Garner was choked to death by a New York City Police Officer. In the wake of his passing, WNYC began an investigation into the New York Police Department’s use of force practices. The resulting series, “NYPD: Bruised” won a 2016 duPont-Columbia award.

A team of reporters including Robert Ian Lewis, Xander Landen, and Noah Veltman, compiled public data to gain a deeper understanding of the volume and nature of citizen complaints against the NYPD. One of their findings was that, while most officers had almost no civilian complaints, about 1,000 officers were the subjects of 10 or more complaints each, including the officer who choked Eric Garner to death.

Analysis of public data also showed that in 55,000 arrests, the top charge was resisting arrest meaning that the interaction with the officer ended up being a more serious infraction than the original alleged wrongdoing. They also uncovered instances where officer’s reports conflicted with audio recordings of civilian interactions, sometimes obfuscating the ways in which officers escalated a situation. This series blended personal stories with data analysis to show systemic issues with how NYPD officers used force in their work.

Listen to the series, here: https://www.wnyc.org/series/nypd-bruised

The latest #OnAssignmentPodcast is out! Listen to a replay of a still timely conversation between Columbia Journalism Pr...
07/10/2020

The latest #OnAssignmentPodcast is out! Listen to a replay of a still timely conversation between Columbia Journalism Professor and The New Yorker Staff Writer, Jelani Cobb, FRONTLINE | PBS producer James Jacoby and Columbia Journalism Professor, Betsy West. They discuss the recently re-broadcast FRONTLINE documentary, “Policing the Police” for which Cobb embedded with the gang unit of the Newark, New Jersey Police Department while the department was under investigation by the Department of Justice for what the DOJ eventually identified as “unconstitutional practices.”

Listen to the full episode, here: https://bit.ly/PolicingthePolice

“Policing the Police” is currently streaming: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2_8vTl6D940&t=4s

07/09/2020
Clarissa Ward of CNN on the Meaning of the duPont Award

Have you done breaking news reporting or been part of a team whose work has had impact? Visit duPont.org and submit your best work today! The submission deadline has been EXTENDED to July 14. Eligibility period is also extended for programming that appears after July 1 and before or on July 14.

“When you win a duPont it means something...not for the award but for what the award represents - doing work that is meaningful.”

Clarissa Ward won her second duPont silver baton in 2020 as part of the team of CNN reporters and producers who collaboratively reported on the murder of Saudi jouranalist Jamal Khashoggi. Ward and the CNN team broke story after story about the Saudi government’s involvement in Khashoggi’s death, most dramatically, reports on the use of a body double to obfuscate the fact that Khashoggi never left the Saudi consulate in Istanbul.

Ward won her first duPont in 2013 for fearless reporting in Syria where she was on the frontlines of the ongoing conflict.

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Better Weapons through our new Scientific Technology. Since our Microbiologists got the Technology to work with Viruses so many Cow, Pig, Monkey, Cat, and Bat Viruses have suddenly jumped from attacking animals to attacking man. The Military Grade form of the old virus much more readily jump from host to host and go airborne and the Kill Rate is often so much higher. Our Politicians, " What are we going to do?" Advisers and Lawyers, " Do what you have been doing since the early 1900's, spend tons and tons of money." Our Politicians, " What if that doesn't work?" Advisers and Lawyers, " Spend even more money, it has fooled everyone in the past." What a bunch of junkies, drunks, perverts, parasites, and Loonies !!!! More Money, More Money, More Money. It's only Money, print more. Our Biological Labs in Ukraine are working with at least 20 Biological Weapons with a much higher kill Rate than the new and improved Corona Beer Virus, with the same level of High Tech Protection the Chinese Lab that allowed the Coronavirus to Accidently escape. https://www.rollcall.com/2020/03/04/trump-expected-to-receive-8-3b-coronavirus-bill-from-congress-quickly/ What is our Great Emergency or Virus of the week ? The guys at the World Health Organizations, our liberal media, our CIA, our FBI, AMA, FDA, and our Politicians say we have nothing to fear from the new Tick being inported to Europe and the United States, eliquids and vape devices, the Huge Drug Industries or their toxic, mind altering, horribly addictive drugs, the Flu or the new Chinese Virus and Cannabis is a Dangerous Drug. https://www.facebook.com/watch/live/?v=645465652881469¬if_id=1582299090207993¬if_t=live_video Ha Ha Ha Ha Ha Ha Ha Ha Ha Ha Ha Ha Ha Ha Ha Ha Ha Ha Ha Ha Ha Ha Ha Ha Ha Ha Ha Ha Ha Ha Ha Ha Ha Ha Ha Ha Ha Ha Ha Ha Ha Ha Ha Ha Ha Ha Ha Ha Ha Ha Ha Ha Ha Ha Ha Ha Ha Ha Ha Ha Ha Ha Ha Ha Ha Ha Ha Ha Ha Ha Ha Ha Ha Ha Ha Ha Ha Ha Ha Ha Ha Ha Ha Ha Ha Ha Ha Ha Ha Ha Ha Ha Ha Ha Ha Ha Ha Ha Ha Ha Ha Ha Ha Ha Ha Ha Ha Ha Ha Ha Ha Ha Ha Ha Ha Ha Ha Ha Ha Ha Ha Ha Ha Ha Ha Ha Ha Ha Ha Ha Ha Ha Ha Ha Ha Ha Think hard, which kills more people Ebola, Prescription Drugs, the flu, rifles and semiautomatic weapons. a. Ebola since we began added up the victims b. Prescription Drugs in 2017 c. The Flu d. Assault Weapons each year d. If you are a liberal you can feel free to answer that question is racist. What has killed more people Ebola with 11,000 since we started keeping score, Prescription Drugs in 2017 more than 47,000 Americans died as a result of an opioid overdose, or the Flu - CDC - 80,000 people died of the flu last winter in the United States , rifles and all types of semiautomatic weapons including Assault Weapons average 200 per year. ? CDC Opioid Death stats 2017. Opioids were involved in 47,600 overdose deaths in 2017 (67.8% of all drug overdose deaths). https://www.cdc.gov/drugoverdose/index.html According to new estimates published today, between 291,000 and 646,000 people worldwide die from seasonal influenza-related respiratory illnesses each year, higher than a previous estimate of 250,000 to 500,000 and based on a robust, multinational survey. 11,000 people have been killed by Ebola. That doesn't really compare to the 450,000 people killed by Tobacco in the United States each year, or the millions killed by Sleeping Sickness, the Flu, and Malaria. Why does Ebola get so much Media Coverage when other things kill so many more people each year then Ebola ? Still happy with getting lied to ? Our media loves to spend hours talking about Ebola, but what diseases actuall kill more people ? CDC - 80,000 people died of the flu last winter in the United States. https://www.medicinenet.com/script/main/art.asp?articlekey=208914 https://www.statnews.com/2018/09/26/cdc-us-flu-deaths-winter/ Will we ever get the truth from our Damn Media, Religous Leaders, or our Damn Politicians ? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ync_EVtR5Ag https://www.who.int/news-room/fact-sheets/detail/the-top-10-causes-of-death Diabetes kills one and a half million people each year, but it is not a great problem in our world. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease claimed 3.0 million lives in 2016, while lung cancer (along with trachea and bronchus cancers) caused 1.7 million deaths. Diabetes killed 1.6 million people in 2016, up from less than 1 million in 2000. Deaths due to dementias more than doubled between 2000 and 2016, making it the 5th leading cause of global deaths in 2016 compared to 14th in 2000. Lower respiratory infections remained the most deadly communicable disease, causing 3.0 million deaths worldwide in 2016. The death rate from diarrhoeal diseases decreased by almost 1 million between 2000 and 2016, but still caused 1.4 million deaths in 2016. Similarly, the number of tuberculosis deaths decreased during the same period, but is still among the top 10 causes with a death toll of 1.3 million. HIV/AIDS is no longer among the world’s top 10 causes of death, having killed 1.0 million people in 2016 compared with 1.5 million in 2000. More people die from Prescription Drugs than from vehicle accidents and guns and crime each year in the United States. https://www.crchealth.com/find-a-treatment-center/opiate-addiction-treatment-centers/additional-resources/prescription-drugs-outpace-car-accidents-leading-death/ Medical Errors, Prescription Drugs, Alcohol, and Drugs kill people, not Marrijuana, guns and crime, or even Ebola. Lock it down end all air flights and all ships in or out. Everyone that goes in is to only carry food or medical products. No one comes out. Isolate the Virus where it occurs. It is a virus that takes human lives - You either Contain it or you let it spread. The Crazy Socialist Liberal Democrat cry babies. The sky is falling. The sky is falling. Wag the Dog. http://www.who.int/csr/disease/ebola/infographic/en/ " Enjoy a vacation in a nation with an Ebola Ephidmic ! ", World Health Organization. Just how many people have been killed by Ebola ? From 1976 to today - Confirmed number of deaths? It is so hard to get any actual numbers, are the Scientists and Medical Community intenionally hiding the data? The World Health Organization, our Media, our Politicians, our FDA, and AMA, what a bunch of Assholes and Liars. If WHO allows Ebola to escape the countries it is in, Ebola deaths this year may get closer to the number of deaths cause by semi automatic weapons and every type of rifle in the United States in a year - 200. But not the number of deaths caused by legal prescription drugs each year - 56,000 in North America. In one year more Americans die by suicide than have been killed by Ebola since we discovered the Disease in 1976. Ebola has been returning every year to parts of Africa for as long as man can remember, maybe 1000 years. Far less have been killed by Ebola in the last 1000 years than are killed by the Flu, Sleeping Sickness, Malaria, or Tobacco and Nicotine or killed by Prescription Drugs alone in one year in the United States. Smoke and mirrors and wag the dog. Not many. Ebola is used as a psycological weapon. Quarantine and Treat in place. http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/africa/4386805.stm Flights from the areas with the Virus are still being allowed ? http://www.businessinsider.com/american-nurse-west-africa-quarantined-tent-2014-10 If you allow people to travel from the nations with the virus, it will be world wide. - As the Chinese Government, our Government, and the rest of the Governments of the world allowed the new Weapons Grade Corona Virus to Spread in November 2019, December 2019, Janurary 2020, and Feburary 2020. https://courses.lumenlearning.com/microbiology/chapter/isolation-culture-and-identification-of-viruses/ Probably our government has not had long enough to decide what to do if a deadly virus is spreading across our world. 40 years isn't time enough to do anything in Washington, DC. http://www.bbc.com/news/magazine-28262541 As a scientific experiment our CDC sees how many people can contract a virus. Quarantine and Treat in place. Do not put victims on a plane and ship them to other nations across the ocean. http://www.nbcdfw.com/news/local/CDC-Ebola-21-Day-Monitoring-Africa-280061332.html CNN talking abut this yet ? At least Obama or some other stupid liberal is not in office now, to fly the victims of a communable deadly disease to the United States. I guess he never saw the movie Contagion, 12 Monkeys, Outbreak, or The Andromeda Strain. You treat victims in place, you don't ship the live virus all over the world, especially in human hosts. https://www.nytimes.com/2017/05/18/world/africa/ebola-outbreak-congo-virus.html http://www.who.int/emergencies/ebola-DRC-2017/en/ Our government would not lie to us unless it was to protect themselves or their party, money was involved, or they felt we didn't need to know. How does that compare to the 33,000 suicides and 57,000 prescription drug overdose deaths each year in the United States? But it is more than the 200 deaths by semiautomatic weapons and every kind of rifle each year in the United States each year. Please share this post for Educational Purposes only. The nurses at many hospitals say they don't know safety precautions against Biological Weapons. Why the hell not nations have used them since before World War 1. Our Hospitals, Biological Weapons Labs, and our police, Fire Departments, and Agencies with other people who respond to Emergencies need to fire everyone who hasn't learned Universal Precautions by now.