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Triple Canopy

Triple Canopy Read Unknown States, our latest issue, which dissects the myths, stories, and fictions that give rise to nations and nationalities. Now online: http://canopycanopycanopy.com/issues#27

Triple Canopy is a nonprofit 501(c)3 organization and a member of Common Practice New York. Triple Canopy is certified by W.A.G.E.

How, in the past hundred years, did billions of people come to not only be subjects of nations but to define themselves ...
05/12/2022
Triple Canopy – Empires in the Sky by Atossa Araxia Abrahamian & Rana Dasgupta

How, in the past hundred years, did billions of people come to not only be subjects of nations but to define themselves as Kenyan, Iraqi, German, or Ukrainian? Join us this Saturday at 5:00 p.m. EDT for an IRL and livestreamed conversation with the writers Atossa Araxia Abrahamian and Rana Dasgupta, who will consider how nations have been invented through stories, symbols, and utopian tracts, and how to reinvent them so as to prevent the future from being determined by cabals of financiers, tyrants, and tech bros.

A conversation about the decline of nations and the task of imagining an alternative that serves people and the planet.

Tomorrow, May 5, at 6:00 p.m., join us IRL at Maysles Documentary Center for The Memory of a Memory, which we’re co-pres...
05/04/2022
Triple Canopy – The Memory of a Memory by Karthik Pandian, Andros Zins-Browne, Yasmina Price & Prismatic Ground

Tomorrow, May 5, at 6:00 p.m., join us IRL at Maysles Documentary Center for The Memory of a Memory, which we’re co-presenting as part of Prismatic Ground, a festival centered on experimental documentary. The screening will feature Karthik Pandian and Andros Zins-Browne’s Three Songs without Z, an adaptation of “Four Songs without Z,” which the duo created with Zakaria Almoutlak for Triple Canopy’s twenty-seventh issue, Unknown States. The work is a portrait of Almoutlak, a sculptor and media activist from Homs, Syria, who fled the civil war in 2015.

Three Songs without Z will be presented alongside Camila Galaz’s Vecino Vecino (2021), Younes Ben Slimane’s We Knew How Beautiful They Were, These Islands (2022), Miatta Kawinzi’s SHE GATHER ME (2021), and Kamila Kuc’s What We Shared (2021). The screening of Three Songs without Z will be followed by a conversation with Pandian and the film critic and scholar Yasmina Price.

Prismatic Ground will take place virtually and in person—at Maysles Documentary Center as well as the Museum of the Moving Image and Anthology Film Archives—from May 4 to 8.

A screening of a portrait of a sculptor and activist who fled the civil war in Syria.

Tomorrow, May 4 at 264 Canal Street, we’re co-presenting an in-person and livestreamed screening with Electronic Arts In...
05/03/2022
Triple Canopy – First World Order by Ilana Harris-Babou, Yasmina Price & Electronic Arts Intermix

Tomorrow, May 4 at 264 Canal Street, we’re co-presenting an in-person and livestreamed screening with Electronic Arts Intermix (EAI), featuring works by Ilana Harris-Babou and Ulysses Jenkins. The screening will be followed by a conversation with Harris-Babou and Yasmina Price.

A screening and conversation about the use of rituals, symbols, and lore to forge identities that defy the logic of the nation.

Tonight at 6:30 p.m. EDT! Join us IRL at 264 Canal Street—or via livestream (below)—for a conversation with Lou Cornum, ...
04/28/2022
Triple Canopy – Stopping Time by Lou Cornum, Raven Chacon & Audra Simpson

Tonight at 6:30 p.m. EDT! Join us IRL at 264 Canal Street—or via livestream (below)—for a conversation with Lou Cornum, Raven Chacon, and Audra Simpson about how Indigenous people are restructuring the relationship between people and the planet.

A conversation about Indigenous models of life, art, and activism that seek to remake the world (and abolish the nation-state).

This Thursday, April 28 at 6:30 p.m. EDT at our venue in Manhattan, the writer Lou Cornum will speak with Raven Chacon, ...
04/26/2022
Triple Canopy – Stopping Time by Lou Cornum, Raven Chacon & Audra Simpson

This Thursday, April 28 at 6:30 p.m. EDT at our venue in Manhattan, the writer Lou Cornum will speak with Raven Chacon, an artist and composer, and Audra Simpson, a political anthropologist, about how Indigenous people are restructuring the relationship between people and the planet. They’ll discuss how the relationship between Indigenous people and nature is often romanticized, reflecting a desire for authenticity that manifests in progressive protests against pipelines as well as in the claims of libertarian ranchers to “ancestral rights” over the land. Drawing on experiences of art as well as activism, Cornum, Chacon, and Simpson will ask how to imagine alternative forms of governance, whether through the speculative narratives of Indigenous Futurism or the protests that halt the world in order to enable the construction of a different one.

Stopping Time is a free in-person event and will be livestreamed.

https://www.canopycanopycanopy.com/issues/27/contents/stopping-time

A conversation about Indigenous models of life, art, and activism that seek to remake the world (and abolish the nation-state).

The invention (and constant reinvention) of Brazilian identity is the story of colliding races, sagas, idioms, rites, an...
04/07/2022
Triple Canopy – Impure Speech by Katrina Dodson

The invention (and constant reinvention) of Brazilian identity is the story of colliding races, sagas, idioms, rites, and translations—and of Mário de Andrade’s frenetic modernist masterpiece Macunaíma: The Hero with No Character (1928), as Katrina Dodson writes in a sweeping essay, “Impure Speech.”

Andrade’s novel is famous for its shapeshifting, superhuman title character’s ability to capture the complexities of the Brazilian condition and the aspirations and shortcomings of the nation. Macunaíma may have “no character,” but that isn’t so much about “a lack as a multitude of attitudes, cultures, and backgrounds that are constantly morphing and converging in ways that exceed definition,” observes Dodson, whose English translation of Macunaíma will be published next year by New Directions. “Dwelling in the haunted legacy of colonization entangled with slavery and immigration, Andrade’s novel resonates with experiences across the Americas and in postcolonial nations elsewhere, but remains largely unknown beyond Brazil, in part because its deeply Brazilian context and language are fiendishly difficult to translate.”

Visit the link in our profile to read Dodson’s essay, which reflects on the relevance of the novel in the age of right-wing nationalism and to the work of Indigenous artists reckoning with the legacy of colonialism. The essay features paintings by the late Makuxi artist Jaider Esbell, whose work is on view at this year’s Venice Biennale. (In February, we published an excerpt from Dodson’s translation and presented her film series on the legacy of Brazilian modernism with BAM.)

An essay on demigod and country, the Brazilian nation as a mythic antihero born from colliding races, sagas, idioms, rites, and translations.

“Because of the fundamental challenge posed by the presence of Indigenous people to the coherence of the United States, ...
03/18/2022
Triple Canopy – Who Belongs to the Land? by Lou Cornum

“Because of the fundamental challenge posed by the presence of Indigenous people to the coherence of the United States, politicians of all persuasions and milquetoast NGOs carefully moderate our presence within the climate movement. Even those who believe we must make change in order to prevent further ecological collapse tend to subscribe to the settler stories of Indigenous people as symbolic victims rather than movers of history.”

“If the land is not given back, it will soon be the sea.” An essay on camps, blockades, and Indigenous models of remaking the world in the face of climate collapse.

Save the date! We’re honoring Mel Chin at our spring benefit. Join us on May 24 at Rule of Thirds in Brooklyn for drinks...
03/07/2022
Triple Canopy – A Benefit for Triple Canopy, Honoring Mel Chin

Save the date! We’re honoring Mel Chin at our spring benefit. Join us on May 24 at Rule of Thirds in Brooklyn for drinks, a seated dinner, and celebrations of Chin’s extraordinary work—which has expanded the bounds (and possibilities) of socially engaged art.

Visit our website to purchase tickets and read more about the event. The complete lineup of performers, speakers, and artists creating works for the occasion will be announced shortly.

Triple Canopy honors Mel Chin at the magazine’s spring benefit.

“The sense of a foreign incursion tends to coincide with the appearance of foreign restaurants, churches, flags, and wor...
03/02/2022
Triple Canopy – The Look of a Nation by April Zhu

“The sense of a foreign incursion tends to coincide with the appearance of foreign restaurants, churches, flags, and workers. But China’s foray into Kenya has had a more subtle, disorienting effect: people have gradually realized that everything around them, from clothing to infrastructure, is being replaced by foreign versions—and that applies even to the cultural objects that they had taken for granted as their own.”

An essay on Kenya’s search for a national dress and discomfort with made-in-China heritage.

"recent immigrants wander place to place. no country must let them in, no country to stay in. only three countries i exp...
03/01/2022
Triple Canopy – Moomins in Exile by Yoko Tawada with Margaret Mitsutani

"recent immigrants wander place to place. no country must let them in, no country to stay in. only three countries i experienced. no time to learn three different languages. might mix up. insufficient space in brain. so made new language. homemade language most scandinavian people understand.”

Read an excerpt from Yoko Tawada’s Scattered All Over the Earth (New Directions, 2022) in our current issue, Unknown States.

“Sauna, Sibelius, Sushi.” A tale of vanishing nations, homemade languages, and climate refugees (human and cartoon).

Cinema Novo provocateur Glauber Rocha’s Antônio das Mortes (1969) is a revolutionary allegory about a conflict between l...
02/14/2022
Antônio das Mortes

Cinema Novo provocateur Glauber Rocha’s Antônio das Mortes (1969) is a revolutionary allegory about a conflict between landowners and peasants, the battle for an old man’s soul, and Brazil’s future. Once a fearsome assassin of revolutionary and populist leaders, Antônio das Mortes (Maurício do Valle) comes out of retirement to take out a young idealist (Lorival Pariz). In a striking rural landscape, Antônio confronts the charismatic outlaw, challenging him to a duel with machetes, but he begins to chafe at the idea of carrying out the will of the Europeanized elite.

Antônio das Mortes is screening Tuesday, February 15 at 7:00 p.m. as part of Brazilian Modernism at 100, a film series programmed by Katrina Dodson and organized in collaboration with BAM. Tickets are $16 for general admission and $8 for BAM members.

Cinema Novo provocateur Glauber Rocha’s revolutionary allegory about a conflict between landowners and peasants, the battle for an old man’s soul, and Brazil’s future. Once a fearsome assassin of revolutionary and populist leaders, Antônio das Mortes (do Valle) comes out of retirement to take...

Written in a mixture of Portuguese and the Indigenous language Tupi, Mário de Andrade’s notoriously untranslatable moder...
02/08/2022
Triple Canopy – Piaimã the Giant by Mário de Andrade with Katrina Dodson

Written in a mixture of Portuguese and the Indigenous language Tupi, Mário de Andrade’s notoriously untranslatable modernist classic, Macunaíma: The Hero with No Character (1928), is a picaresque tour of Brazil that crams four centuries and a continental expanse into a single mythic plane that bends the rules of time and geography.

In a chapter excerpted from Katrina Dodson’s forthcoming translation for New Directions, the title character has lost a magic amulet called the muiraquitã, a memento from his lover, Ci, who left him to become a star in the sky. The hero journeys with his brothers to São Paulo to retrieve the talisman, which has fallen into the hands of Venceslau Pietro Pietra, an Italo-Peruvian captain of industry who is also a cannibal giant known as Piaimã.

Despite the centrality of the book to Brazilian literature and to more general debates about what (and who) defines national identity, Macunaíma remains largely unknown in the Anglophone world, in part because of its sweeping set of mythological references and dizzying use of languages and dialects from across Brazil.

The publication of the excerpted chapter, “Piaimã the Giant,” coincides with Brazilian Modernism at 100, a film series programmed by Dodson and organized in collaboration with BAM. Cinema Novo pioneer Joaquim Pedro de Andrade’s adaptation of Andrade’s novel is screening Friday, February 11 at 7:00 p.m., followed by a discussion with Dodson, filmmaker Rodrigo Séllos, and writer Ananda Lima, moderated by Triple Canopy senior editor Matthew Shen Goodman.

“Ogoró! ogoró! ogoró!” A shape-shifting demigod visits an industrializing São Paulo, bathes in enchanted water, and meets a cannibal giant.

Limite (1931) is a masterful early work of independent Latin American filmmaking and the only feature from Brazilian dir...
02/07/2022
Limite

Limite (1931) is a masterful early work of independent Latin American filmmaking and the only feature from Brazilian director and author Mário Peixoto. An extraordinary silent film filled with luscious images and glorious Brazilian scenery, Limite loosely follows two women and a man adrift at sea, conjuring their pasts to the music of Erik Satie, Claude Debussy, Igor Stravinsky, and others.

Limite is screening Sunday, February 13 at 7:00 p.m. as part of Brazilian Modernism at 100, a film series programmed by Katrina Dodson and organized in collaboration with BAM. Tickets are $16 for general admission and $8 for BAM members.

New cinematic techniques constantly unfold in this extraordinary silent film, a masterful early work of independent Latin American filmmaking and the only feature from Brazilian director and author Mário Peixoto. Lost for decades until it resurfaced in the 70s and became a major influence on genera...

In Miramar (1997), the director Júlio Bressane, a key figure in São Paulo’s radical Cinema Marginal movement during the ...
02/04/2022
Miramar + Of Murals & Mosaics

In Miramar (1997), the director Júlio Bressane, a key figure in São Paulo’s radical Cinema Marginal movement during the late 1960s, offers a loose take on the modernist writer Oswald de Andrade’s bildungsroman Sentimental Memories of João Miramar (1924). The film tells the story of a young man who takes up a 16mm camera after his parents die and determines to record anything that moves in a quest to capture the world as it is. The young cinephile sifts through the influences of Einstein, Jean Cocteau, and Hollywood in Bressane’s boundary-pushing, free-flowing film.

Of Murals and Mosaics (2010) explores Brazil’s midcentury modernist architecture of the 1950s and 60s with an inventive video collage about groundbreaking muralist Paulo Werneck’s incredible mosaics.

Miramar and Of Murals and Mosaics are screening Sunday, February 13 at 4:30 p.m. as part of Brazilian Modernism at 100, a film series programmed by Katrina Dodson and organized in collaboration with BAM. The screening will be introduced by Of Murals and Mosaics director Vivian Ostrovsky. Tickets are $16 for general admission and $8 for BAM members.

Júlio Bressane's loose take on Oswald de Andrade’s 1924 bildungsroman, Sentimental Memories of João Miramar, screens with a video collage on mid-century muralist Paulo Werneck.

In the fantasy comedy Brazilwood Man (1982), the iconic Brazilian modernist writer Oswald de Andrade is played by two ac...
02/03/2022
Brazilwood Man

In the fantasy comedy Brazilwood Man (1982), the iconic Brazilian modernist writer Oswald de Andrade is played by two actors—representing his feminine anima and his masculine side. A poet, playwright, novelist, socialist agitator, and revolutionary,Andrade was one of the organizers of Brazil’s legendary 1922 Week of Modern Art. Brazilwood Man takes its title from Andrade’s literary manifesto Pau-Brasil (Brazil Wood), a rejection of Portuguese literary and social artifice. The final film by Joaquim Pedro de Andrade (no relation to Oswald), Brazilwood Man is a series of collage-like fragments woven together by the writer’s words and matching his audacious spirit.

Brazilwood Man is screening Sunday, February 13 at 2:00 p.m. as part of Brazilian Modernism at 100, a film series programmed by Katrina Dodson and organized in collaboration with BAM. Tickets are $16 for general admission and $8 for BAM members.

The iconic Brazilian modernist writer Oswald de Andrade is played by two actors—representing his feminine anima and his masculine side—in this fantasy comedy that satirizes the passions and hypocrisies of the Brazilian modernist movement. The film weaves together quotes from Oswald’s “Brazil...

“I wanted this series to highlight questions that Brazilian artists and writers continue to ask about history and the ef...
02/03/2022
The Groundbreaking Cinematic Legacy of Brazilian Modernism

“I wanted this series to highlight questions that Brazilian artists and writers continue to ask about history and the effects of colonialism, which connect to the 1920s modernist movement, when artists were trying to expand their ideas of how to represent Brazil and what it meant to be Brazilian by looking beyond the dominant European or North American aesthetics and incorporating rural folk traditions, Indigenous cultures, and African influences,” Dodson told Hyperallergic.

On the bicentennial of the nation's independence, the Brooklyn Academy of Music will show six films traversing six decades of Brazilian cinema.

Searching for Makunaíma (2020) follows Brazil’s most famous fictional character, the eponymous hero of Mário de Andrade’...
02/02/2022
Searching for Makunaíma

Searching for Makunaíma (2020) follows Brazil’s most famous fictional character, the eponymous hero of Mário de Andrade’s modernist novel Macunaíma (1928), back to his origin as the mythic figure Makunaíma, as he is known to Indigenous people in the northern Amazon. Winner of Best Film Award at the Brasília Film Festival 2020, Rodrigo Séllos’s documentary traces Andrade’s hero across Brazil’s sweeping landscapes and over hundreds of years, letting his story unfold through interviews in Portuguese, German, Spanish, and the indigenous languages Macuxi and Taurepang.

Searching for Makunaíma is screening Saturday, February 12 at 7:00 p.m. as part of Brazilian Modernism at 100, a film series organized in collaboration with BAM. The screening will be followed by a Q&A with the director, moderated by series programmer Katrina Dodson. Tickets are $16 for general admission and $8 for BAM members.

Follow Brazil’s most famous fictional character, the hero of Mário de Andrade’s modernist novel Macunaíma, back to his origins as Makunaíma, the mythic ancestor of Indigenous people in the northern Amazon. Winner of the Best Film Award at the 2020 Brasília Film Festival, Séllos’ documenta...

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Tomorrow, May 4th at 6:30pm, join #WarholGrantee Triple Canopy for a screening of work by the artist Ilana Harris-Babou alongside videos by Ulysses Jenkins from the collection of Electronic Arts Intermix (EAI), which is co-organizing the event. The screening will be followed by a conversation between Harris-Babou and the film critic and scholar Yasmina Price. EAI has made the videos—along with a selection of related works by Anthony Ramos and Philip Mallory Jones that will not be shown at the event—available to the public for free for a limited time. This is event is available in person or via livestream. Visit their website for more information.
Artist Ilana Harris Babou '09 is screening her newest video, Leaf of Life, on Wednesday, May 4th at 6:30pm, with Triple Canopy and Electronic Arts Intermix (EAI). After the screening, she will be in conversation with the writer and researcher Yasmina Price. You can RSVP at the link.
Starting tonight, #warholgrantee Triple Canopy has collaborated with Brooklyn Academy of Music (BAM) to present a film series curated by translator and writer Katrina Dodson entitled "Brazilian Modernism at 100", that commemorates the bicentennial of Brazil’s independence and the one hundredth anniversary of the legendary 1922 Modern Art Week, which inaugurated a new, uniquely Brazilian sensibility. "Brazilian Modernism at 100" coincides with Triple Canopy’s forthcoming publication of an excerpt from Dodson’s new translation of Macunaíma (New Directions, 2023) as part of Unknown States, an issue on the fictions that make up nations and nationalities.
🔸Miasma, Plants, Export Paintings | A Screening with Bo Wang🔸⁣⁣ ⁣⁣ Join Triple Canopy and AAA-A this Sunday 1/30 from 1:00-2:30pm EST for virtual screening of recent works by the artist and filmmaker Bo Wang. ⁣⁣ In his films, Wang considers the spatial reorderings and epistemological reclassifications accompanying the West’s imperial incursions—as well as the immense profits garnered, particularly through the o***m trade. With an eye to the reverberations of these encounters in the present, Wang asks how people understand themselves and others through the circulation of goods, the filming of fictions, and the invention of systems to contain and categorize the wares, tales, and peoples of foreign nations.⁣ ⁣⁣ Wang will be joined in conversation by Triple Canopy senior editor Matthew Shen Goodman following the screening. Sign up now here: https://us02web.zoom.us/webinar/register/8716418309775/WN_C71Ii2UvT8i99fSLaLNcCw ⁣⁣ ⁣ Images: 1. Video Still, Bo Wang, “Miasma, Plants, Export Paintings" (2017). Courtesy of the Artist. 2. Video Still, Bo Wang, “Reporting on the 70th Anniversary of Empress of China Reached Canton, 1853”. Courtesy of the Artist.
In episode 5 of Triple Canopy's podcast Medium Rotation, "Set It Off" artist Jeremy Toussaint-Baptiste guides you to tune your ears to the frequencies at and below the threshold of human hearing 🎧 Medium Rotation features artists, writers, musicians, and scholars probing the conditions and countering the received ideas of our time (and other times), along with Triple Canopy editors. Each season is animated by the concerns of an issue of the magazine. The first season, Omniaudience, asks how we understand ourselves and others through listening—and what the obstacles to listening reveal about our society. LISTEN NOW ↓ https://bit.ly/3q3quDV
EAI has relocated! Please note our new address: Electronic Arts Intermix (EAI) 264 Canal Street #3W New York, NY 10012 We have departing after many happy years in Chelsea and a rewarding residence with Dia Art Foundation – a period that saw the blossoming of our public programs. Over the last two decades, we have hosted an incredible range of events, connecting attentive audiences with artists and their moving-image works. It is the engagement and collective participation nurtured at 535 West 22nd street that we will be bringing with us to our new space. The pandemic created a strong network of peer organizations in NYC, and one exciting outcome was an opportunity to share a space at 264 Canal with Triple Canopy, the highly-regarded and influential magazine and publishing platform, which has been operating in the space since 2016. The neighborhood immediately situates EAI in a vibrant and dynamic community, both within the arts and the city itself. We are also delighted to partner with a small arts organization that, like EAI, is committed to nurturing exploration and resisting easy classification. Alternative means of distributing and providing access to information is at the core of both of our missions, and we can support each other to that end. There are many rich potentials for programmatic collaborations, drawing from an incredibly diverse and international roster of scholars, writers, designers, and artists. The beautiful shared space, designed by Leong Leong, is built out to comfortably host classes, events, staff, and visitors. EAI is thrilled to bring its singular collection of over five decades of video and media art to this gathering place. We look forward to welcome you to future events when it feels safe to gather! https://mailchi.mp/eai/electronic-arts-intermix-eai-is-moving
"I’m thinking about models of acting and being activated that have nothing to do with the stage, or with scenery, or with props, or with anything more or less than the moving body itself." STEFFANI JEMISON, this year's Light Work UVP commissioned artist, considers the practice of mime and mimicry in relation to language, expression, empathy, and violence in ON SIMILITUDE, which she created for Triple Canopy this past summer. #SteffaniJemison will be in conversation with her collaborator Alexis Page in a public talk hosted by Light Work THIS THURSDAY, APRIL 15 on ZOOM. Register here: https://www.lightwork.org/.../my-body-is-opaque-special.../
"I’m thinking about models of acting and being activated that have nothing to do with the stage, or with scenery, or with props, or with anything more or less than the moving body itself." STEFFANI JEMISON, this year's Light Work Urban Video Project commissioned artist, considers the practice of mime and mimicry in relation to language, expression, empathy, and violence in ON SIMILITUDE, which she created for Triple Canopy this past summer. Register for #SteffaniJemison's talk THURSDAY on ZOOM: https://www.lightwork.org/.../my-body-is-opaque-special.../
MIDNIGHT SUN is the third episode in Frank Heath's ON THE BEACH series, an ongoing project inspired by Nevil Shute’s eponymous 1957 postapocalyptic novel and commissioned by the curatorial platform Triple Canopy. In connection to our upcoming exhibition, the film is presented as part of a two-part video program that responds to questions surrounding the environment, access, and mobility.
Beowulf Triple canopy,
This week in essays, Harmony Holiday shares a hybrid essay that meditates on the origins, uses, and power of Black silence at Triple Canopy, Naomi Jackson writes on her own experience in a health care system where unfair levels of self-advocacy are required of Black women just to give birth safely for Harper's Magazine, and more.
BLACK LIVES MATTER: Hyperallergic features the theatres, museums, and art institutions that have opened their doors to #JusticeForGeorgeFloyd and #BlackLivesMatter protestors, including The Public Theater, Studio Theatre, Woolly Mammoth Theatre Company, Brooklyn Museum, MoMA PS1, The Invisible Dog Art Center, Asian American Writer's Workshop, and Triple Canopy.