Rockefeller University Press

Rockefeller University Press We publish The Journal of Cell Biology, The Journal of Experimental Medicine, and The Journal of General Physiology. The Rockefeller University Press (RUP) is committed to quality and integrity in scientific publishing.

Our goal is to publish excellent science using the latest technologies. We carry out rigorous peer review, applying the highest standards of novelty, mechanistic insight, data integrity, and general interest. In the internet age, the ability to distribute information is no longer restricted to publishers, and everyone is overloaded with information. Thus, the current value of a scientific publishe

Our goal is to publish excellent science using the latest technologies. We carry out rigorous peer review, applying the highest standards of novelty, mechanistic insight, data integrity, and general interest. In the internet age, the ability to distribute information is no longer restricted to publishers, and everyone is overloaded with information. Thus, the current value of a scientific publishe

A new therapeutic approach prevents the growth of metastatic tumors in mice by forcing cancer cells into a dormant state...
11/23/2021
By putting cancer cells to sleep, new drug could prevent tumor metastasis

A new therapeutic approach prevents the growth of metastatic tumors in mice by forcing cancer cells into a dormant state in which they are unable to proliferate. The study, published today in the Journal of Experimental Medicine (JEM), could lead to new treatments that prevent the recurrence or spread of various cancer types, including breast cancer and head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC).

Read Press Release: https://bit.ly/3l22vSZ
Read original JEM study: https://bit.ly/3nI72vk

A new therapeutic approach prevents the growth of metastatic tumors in mice by forcing cancer cells into a dormant state in which they are unable to proliferate. The study, published November 23 in the Journal of Experimental Medicine (JEM), could lead to new treatments that prevent the recurrence o...

We are pleased to announce the completion of our first phase of a content syndication pilot partnership with ResearchGat...
11/23/2021
OA content from RUP now available on ResearchGate

We are pleased to announce the completion of our first phase of a content syndication pilot partnership with ResearchGate. RG Users can now find full-text Immediate Open Access articles and a subset of five years of archival content published in the Journal of Cell Biology (JCB), Journal of Experimental Medicine (JEM), and Journal of General Physiology (JGP) on the network—about 2,800 articles in total. JCB, JEM, and JGP authors with RG profiles will see their titles added to publication pages automatically and have insight into usage statistics. https://bit.ly/3nHtzbV

Browse articles from Journal of Cell Biology (JCB), Journal of Experimental Medicine (JEM), and Journal of General Physiology (JGP)

OA Switchboard makes it easier for institutions to manage read-and-publish deals with multiple publishers. A “back offic...
11/11/2021
OA Switchboard Reporting Made Easy video animation

OA Switchboard makes it easier for institutions to manage read-and-publish deals with multiple publishers. A “back office” service, OA Switchboard enables funders, institutions, and publishers to send and receive a standardized messaging between all parties via API, User Interface, or e-mail to report on deal compliance and share version-of-record article metadata, among other functions. Rockefeller University Press currently uses the OA Switchboard to report to its read-and-publish partners and share article metadata. We encourage more institutions, funders, and publishers to join OA Switchboard, and to contact OA Switchboard Executive Director Yvonne Campfens for more information. Learn more about OA Switchboard in this three-minute video. https://bit.ly/3oodwP0

Learn what the OA Switchboard is, how it can benefit your organisation, and how 'reporting made easy' works in just 3 minutes!

Researchers at Yale School of Medicine have discovered that an RNA molecule that stimulates the body’s early antiviral d...
11/10/2021
Yale researchers develop RNA-based therapy that clears SARS-CoV-2 from mice

Researchers at Yale School of Medicine have discovered that an RNA molecule that stimulates the body’s early antiviral defense system can protect mice from a range of emerging SARS-CoV-2 variants. The study, published today in the Journal of Experimental Medicine (JEM), could lead to new treatments for COVID-19 in immunocompromised patients, as well as providing an inexpensive therapeutic option for developing countries that currently lack access to vaccines.
Press Release: https://bit.ly/3n1H9q4
Original JEM study: https://bit.ly/3wwnlhP

Researchers at Yale School of Medicine have discovered that an RNA molecule that stimulates the body’s early antiviral defense system can protect mice from a range of emerging SARS-CoV-2 variants. The study, published today in the Journal of Experimental Medicine (JEM), could lead to new treatment...

The Journal of Experimental Medicine presents a special collection on Cancer Immunotherapy to accompany Society for Immu...
11/10/2021
JEM Cancer Immunotherapy 2021 | Journal of Experimental Medicine | Rockefeller University Press

The Journal of Experimental Medicine presents a special collection on Cancer Immunotherapy to accompany Society for Immunotherapy of Cancer's annual meeting #SITC21. This special collection curated by the JEM editorial team includes articles on the roles and implications of innate immunity, adaptive immunity, and cytokines in cancer immunology and immunotherapy research 👇

This special collection curated by the JEM editorial team includes articles on the roles and implications of innate immunity, adaptive immunity, and cytokines in cancer immunology and immunotherapy research. Articles featured in the collection were publ...

The Journal of General Physiology (JGP) presents a special collection of articles to accompany the Neuroscience 2021 vir...
11/04/2021
Neuroscience Collection 2021 | Journal of General Physiology | Rockefeller University Press

The Journal of General Physiology (JGP) presents a special collection of articles to accompany the Neuroscience 2021 virtual meeting #SfN21. These studies cover subjects from the role of ion channels in neuronal excitability and photoreceptor signal transmission to how poisonous animals prevent autointoxication. The collection has been curated to showcase the diversity of topics and the quality of research published in JGP.

We hope you enjoy reading the collection and welcome your comments 👇

JGP is pleased to present this special collection of recent neuroscience articles. These studies cover subjects from the role of ion channels in neuronal excitability and photoreceptor signal transmission to how poisonous animals prevent autointoxicatio...

The Journal of Experimental Medicine (JEM) presents a special collection of articles to accompany the Neuroscience 2021 ...
11/04/2021
Neuroscience Collection 2021 | Journal of Experimental Medicine | Rockefeller University Press

The Journal of Experimental Medicine (JEM) presents a special collection of articles to accompany the Neuroscience 2021 virtual meeting #SfN21. The collection includes articles on neurodegeneration in Alzheimer's disease, neuroinvasion of SARS-CoV-2, peripheral neuropathy, stroke, and acute spinal cord injury, as well as the role of innate immunity, adaptive immunity, and microglia in neuroinflammation. The collection also features review articles from our recent Special Focus on Neuro-Immune Interactions.

We hope you will enjoy reading this collection and encourage your feedback 👇

This special collection curated by the JEM editorial team includes articles on neurodegeneration in Alzheimer's disease, neuroinvasion of SARS-CoV-2, peripheral neuropathy, stroke, and acute spinal cord injury, as well as the role of innate immunity, ad...

The Journal of Cell Biology (JCB) presents a special collection of articles to accompany the Neuroscience 2021 virtual m...
11/04/2021
Cellular Neurobiology 2021 | Journal of Cell Biology | Rockefeller University Press

The Journal of Cell Biology (JCB) presents a special collection of articles to accompany the Neuroscience 2021 virtual meeting #SfN21. The collection explores the cell biological mechanisms of stem cell polarity and neural induction, vesicular and autophagosomal motility and fusion, mitochondrial anchoring, the interplay between neuronal remodeling and myelination, and the regulation of glial metabolism. It also includes recent Reviews on the cell biology of Parkinson's Disease, synapse formation, and the role of lipid droplets in the nervous system.

We hope that you enjoy our editors' selections and welcome your feedback 👇

In this special collection of recent cutting-edge neuroscience research published in JCB, we explore the cell biological mechanisms of stem cell polarity and neural induction, vesicular and autophagosomal motility and fusion, mitochondrial anchoring, th...

On the Journal of General Physiology (JGP)'s November cover: an endogenous voltage-sensor activity probe, or EVAP, is ab...
11/01/2021

On the Journal of General Physiology (JGP)'s November cover: an endogenous voltage-sensor activity probe, or EVAP, is able to selectively image the location and activation status of native K+ channels. EVAPs are comprised of a fluorescently labeled tarantula toxin (magenta) that binds voltage sensors of the potassium channel Kv2.1 (green, right) or Kv2.2 (center), but not Kv4.2 (left) when they are expressed at the surface membrane (blue). Thapa et al. present a method to label Kv2 potassium channels in live tissue and image them using two-photon microscopy, enabling the inference of conformational changes in situ (https://bit.ly/3blDRak).
Read JGP November Issue: https://bit.ly/3jDjDO7

On the Journal of General Physiology (JGP)'s November cover: an endogenous voltage-sensor activity probe, or EVAP, is able to selectively image the location and activation status of native K+ channels. EVAPs are comprised of a fluorescently labeled tarantula toxin (magenta) that binds voltage sensors of the potassium channel Kv2.1 (green, right) or Kv2.2 (center), but not Kv4.2 (left) when they are expressed at the surface membrane (blue). Thapa et al. present a method to label Kv2 potassium channels in live tissue and image them using two-photon microscopy, enabling the inference of conformational changes in situ (https://bit.ly/3blDRak).
Read JGP November Issue: https://bit.ly/3jDjDO7

The Journal of Experimental Medicine (JEM)'s November cover shows fluorescent co-staining of retinal sections from 18-mo...
11/01/2021

The Journal of Experimental Medicine (JEM)'s November cover shows fluorescent co-staining of retinal sections from 18-mo-old Cyp2u1−/− mice, stained for Arrestin (green), PNA (red), and DAPI (blue). Pujol et al. show the importance of mitochondrial metabolism in SPG56, providing new insight into a complicated disease (https://bit.ly/3vPIRgY).
Read JEM’s November Issue: https://bit.ly/3nzX3qL

The Journal of Experimental Medicine (JEM)'s November cover shows fluorescent co-staining of retinal sections from 18-mo-old Cyp2u1−/− mice, stained for Arrestin (green), PNA (red), and DAPI (blue). Pujol et al. show the importance of mitochondrial metabolism in SPG56, providing new insight into a complicated disease (https://bit.ly/3vPIRgY).
Read JEM’s November Issue: https://bit.ly/3nzX3qL

The Journal of Cell Biology (JCB)'s November cover shows a montage of several distinct pictures of human hematopoietic s...
11/01/2021

The Journal of Cell Biology (JCB)'s November cover shows a montage of several distinct pictures of human hematopoietic stem cells (actin is shown in white, nuclei in yellow/red) purified from cord blood and bound to human osteoblasts that are spread in the bottom of a microwell (blue/green shows actin in the top-left cell and microtubules in the bottom-right cell). Bessy, Candelas et al. show that hematopoietic stem cells polarize upon interaction with specific stromal cells (https://bit.ly/3FZbxcc).

Read JCB’s November Issue: https://bit.ly/3EgfKGE

The Journal of Cell Biology (JCB)'s November cover shows a montage of several distinct pictures of human hematopoietic stem cells (actin is shown in white, nuclei in yellow/red) purified from cord blood and bound to human osteoblasts that are spread in the bottom of a microwell (blue/green shows actin in the top-left cell and microtubules in the bottom-right cell). Bessy, Candelas et al. show that hematopoietic stem cells polarize upon interaction with specific stromal cells (https://bit.ly/3FZbxcc).

Read JCB’s November Issue: https://bit.ly/3EgfKGE

Journal of Experimental Medicine (JEM) is now presenting opportunities to engage in Continuing Medical Education (#CME) ...
10/25/2021
Journal-Based CME Activities with Journal of Experimental Medicine (JEM) - MSK CME - Continuing Education (CE)

Journal of Experimental Medicine (JEM) is now presenting opportunities to engage in Continuing Medical Education (#CME) in collaboration with Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center. Each Journal-Based CME activity consists of a full-text article that is free to read, a multiple-choice question test, and an evaluation/self-assessment. Those who participate in CME activities with JEM will be tested on their comprehension of the key concepts in the selected articles, with the objective of enriching their clinical practice and patient care through better understanding of scientific advances and new techniques in the fields covered by JEM. We are pleased to present these continuing medical education activities to all at no charge. Learn more at the Course Overview page on the MSKCC CME website: https://bit.ly/3DXzxdU

MSK CME, Journal-Based CME Activities with Journal of Experimental Medicine (JEM), 8/1/2021 10:00:00 AM - 8/1/2024 10:00:00 AM, The Journal of Experimental Medicine (JEM) publishes peer-reviewed papers within the field of medical biology, providing novel conceptual insights into immunology, cance...

"A vaccine designed to produce immunity against the most stable portion of coronaviruses has been found to neutralize vi...
10/21/2021
Potential Universal Coronavirus Vaccine Provides Broad Protection In Mice

"A vaccine designed to produce immunity against the most stable portion of coronaviruses has been found to neutralize viruses in mice." IFLScience reports on a recent JEM study (https://bit.ly/2YFxETY) by the Kurosaki team at Osaka University.
https://www.iflscience.com/health-and-medicine/potential-universal-coronavirus-vaccine-provides-broad-protection-in-mice/

A vaccine designed to produce immunity against the most stable portion of coronaviruses has been found to neutralize viruses in mice. If the work can be tr

"Importantly, this agreement guarantees all students, graduate students, and doctoral and postdoctoral researchers affil...
10/21/2021
VIVA and Rockefeller University Press Establish Read-and-Publish Agreement

"Importantly, this agreement guarantees all students, graduate students, and doctoral and postdoctoral researchers affiliated with VIVA, The Virtual Library of Virginia member institutions have access to all articles published in JCB, JEM, and JGP, and thanks to VIVA’s support, the ability to publish cost-free in the journals.”- The Rockefeller University Press Executive Director Susan King.
Learn how researchers in Virginia can benefit:

https://rupress.org

The Journal of Experimental medicine (JEM) presents a special collection of articles to accompany the International Cyto...
10/13/2021
Cytokines Collection 2021

The Journal of Experimental medicine (JEM) presents a special collection of articles to accompany the International Cytokine and Interferon Society's Annual Meeting #Cytokines2021. The collection encompasses original research articles and reviews on the roles of cytokine signaling, including the interferon and interleukin pathways, in innate immunity and host defense. Topics covered include inflammation, infectious diseases (including COVID-19), tumor immunology, and immunotherapy. Read the collection:

https://rupress.org

Researchers in Japan have developed a vaccination strategy in mice that promotes the production of antibodies that can n...
10/08/2021
Researchers demonstrate vaccination approach in mice that could prevent future coronavirus outbreaks

Researchers in Japan have developed a vaccination strategy in mice that promotes the production of antibodies that can neutralize not only SARS-CoV-2 but a broad range of other coronaviruses as well. If successfully translated to humans, the approach, published today in the Journal of Experimental Medicine, could lead to the development of a next-generation vaccine capable of preventing future coronavirus pandemics.
Read Press Release: https://bit.ly/2YyQJr4
Read original study: https://bit.ly/2YFxETY

Researchers in Japan have developed a vaccination strategy in mice that promotes the production of antibodies that can neutralize not only SARS-CoV-2 but a broad range of other coronaviruses as well. If successfully translated to humans, the approach, to be published October 8 in the Journal of Expe...

We are thrilled to announce a content syndication agreement with ResearchGate, the professional network for researchers....
10/07/2021

We are thrilled to announce a content syndication agreement with ResearchGate, the professional network for researchers. Under the agreement, all content published as immediate open access (OA) in Journal of Cell Biology (JCB), Journal of Experimental Medicine (JEM), and Journal of General Physiology (JGP) will be accessible on ResearchGate. The collaboration aims to make it easier for researchers to discover and access OA content from these journals, help authors increase the visibility of their work, and connect with readers. Learn more: https://bit.ly/3uNkfFe

We are thrilled to announce a content syndication agreement with ResearchGate, the professional network for researchers. Under the agreement, all content published as immediate open access (OA) in Journal of Cell Biology (JCB), Journal of Experimental Medicine (JEM), and Journal of General Physiology (JGP) will be accessible on ResearchGate. The collaboration aims to make it easier for researchers to discover and access OA content from these journals, help authors increase the visibility of their work, and connect with readers. Learn more: https://bit.ly/3uNkfFe

Address

950 3rd Ave
New York, NY
10022

General information

The Rockefeller University Press (RUP) is committed to quality and integrity in scientific publishing. Our goal is to publish excellent science using the latest technologies. We carry out rigorous peer review, applying the highest standards of novelty, mechanistic insight, data integrity, and general interest.

Telephone

(212) 327-7938

Products

RUP publishes The Journal of Cell Biology, The Journal of Experimental Medicine, and The Journal of General Physiology.

Visit the RUP Store for information about books, videos, subscriptions, and posters: http://www.rupress.org/site/subscriptions/store.xhtml

Alerts

Be the first to know and let us send you an email when Rockefeller University Press posts news and promotions. Your email address will not be used for any other purpose, and you can unsubscribe at any time.

Contact The Business

Send a message to Rockefeller University Press:

Videos

Category

Nearby media companies


Other Publishers in New York

Show All

Comments

Thanks to our partnership with Rockefeller University Press , researchers can now access 2,800 open access articles from Journal of Cell Biology, Journal of Experimental Medicine, and Journal of General Physiology on ResearchGate. The future of academic publishing is open! https://bit.ly/3xoxIop #OpenAccess #ResearchGate #partnership
Les rhumes infantiles aident-ils le corps à réagir à la COVID? Un mécanisme connu sous le nom de «péché originel antigénique» protège certaines personnes de la grippe; on ne sait toujours pas si cela aide les réactions immunitaires aux coronavirus. Certaines personnes sont plus douées pour combattre la grippe saisonnière lorsque la souche du virus de la grippe est similaire à la première qu’elles ont rencontrée dans l’enfance – un phénomène appelé de manière évocatrice «péché originel antigénique», , également connu sous le nom «d'effet Hoskins». Maintenant, il y a de plus en plus de preuves que les réponses immunitaires des gens à covid-19 pourraient être façonnées de la même manière par des infections antérieures par des coronavirus du rhume. L’effet pourrait avoir des implications pour la conception des futurs vaccins contre la COVID-19. Cependant, on ne sait toujours pas dans quelle mesure il affecte les personnes atteintes de la COVID-19 – et s’il offre une protection accrue ou, en fait, entrave la réponse immunitaire. « Le débat est assez polarisé en ce moment », explique Craig Thompson, virologue à l’Université d’Oxford, au Royaume-Uni. L'effet Hoskins – également appelée empreinte immunitaire – a été caractérisée pour la première fois en 1960 par l’épidémiologiste américain Thomas Francis Jr, qui a remarqué que le système immunitaire semblait être programmé en permanence pour produire des anticorps contre la première souche d’un virus de la grippe qu’il a rencontré(1). Les cellules immunitaires se réactivent lorsque le corps est infecté par un virus de la grippe qui partage des régions, ou « épitopes », avec cette première souche. Pour le SRAS-CoV-2, il existe de plus en plus de preuves que l’exposition à d’autres coronavirus – y compris ceux qui causent le rhume et d’autres maladies respiratoires – joue un rôle dans les réponses immunitaires des personnes. « Tout comme la grippe, la plupart d’entre nous sont infectés par ces coronavirus courants à l’âge de cinq ou six ans », explique Scott Hensley, microbiologiste à l’Université de Pennsylvanie à Philadelphie. Son groupe a découvert que des échantillons de sérum sanguin prélevés sur des personnes avant la pandémie contenaient des anticorps contre un coronavirus du rhume appelé OC43 qui pourrait se lier à la protéine de pointe du SRAS-Cov-2(2). En utilisant des échantillons prélevés avant et après l’infection par le SRAS-CoV-2, Hensley et ses collègues ont pu montrer que la capture du SARS-CoV-2 augmentait la production d’anticorps se liant à l’OC43. Leur étude, publiée en avril, a révélé que ces anticorps se luxaient à la sous-unité S2 de la protéine de pointe du SARS-CoV-2 – qui a une structure similaire à celle de l’OC43. Mais les anticorps OC43 ne se sont pas liés à la région S1 du pic du SRAS-CoV-2 et ont été incapables d’empêcher le virus de pénétrer dans les cellules. Effets de l’impression Dans certains cas, l’impression est connue pour avoir un effet positif sur l’immunité. Hensley et ses collègues ont étudié les effets de l’empreinte pendant la pandémie de grippe H1N1 de 2009 et ont constaté que l’exposition à certaines souches de grippe historiques offrait une protection contre l’infection par le H1N1.(3). « Il y avait des épitopes dans ce virus qui ont été conservés avec les souches de grippe saisonnière passées », explique Hensley. « Le rappel des réponses d’anticorps contre ces épitopes a été bénéfique. » Mais la SV présente également des inconvénients potentiels. Parfois, les anticorps produits à la suite de l’impression ne correspondent pas très bien au virus à l’origine d’une infection, mais leur production supprime l’activation des cellules B naïves qui produiraient autrement des anticorps plus protecteurs. « Vous obtenez une réponse qui peut être biaisée vers les antigènes conservés par rapport aux nouveaux antigènes », explique Adolfo García-Sastre, directeur du Global Health and Emerging Pathogens Institute à l’École de médecine Icahn du mont Sinaï à New York. Cela peut diminuer la capacité du système immunitaire à combattre la nouvelle infection. García-Sastre a examiné les réponses immunitaires précoces des personnes hospitalisées pour COVID-19 en Espagne et a observé une augmentation des niveaux d’anticorps contre OC43 et un autre bêtacoronavirus, appelé HKU1, qui partageait des épitopes avec le SRAS-CoV-2(4). « Nous avons cherché une corrélation entre les personnes qui montent des [niveaux] d’anticorps plus élevés contre ces épitopes conservés par rapport à une immunité moins protectrice contre le SRAS-COV-2, et il y avait une légère corrélation », explique García-Sastre. Des signes d’impact négatif sur la SV chez les personnes atteintes de COVID-19 ont également été observés par Thompson et ses collègues, dans une prépublication publiée plus tôt cette année(5). L’analyse était basée sur des échantillons prélevés en 2020 auprès de personnes au Royaume-Uni présentant des infections asymptomatiques et de personnes admises à l’hôpital pour une GRAVE COVID-19, dont la moitié est décédée par la suite. Les chercheurs ont constaté que les personnes décédées produisaient moins d’anticorps contre la protéine de pointe du SRAS-CoV-2 que les personnes qui avaient survécu, mais produisaient la même quantité d’anticorps contre une autre protéine présente dans le virus – la protéine nucléocapside. Thompson dit que ces résultats indiquent que les souvenirs imprimés de la protéine de pointe d’un autre coronavirus pourraient empêcher une réponse immunitaire plus efficace chez ceux qui n’ont pas survécu. «C’est une empreinte digitale de l’effet Hoskins», dit-il. Mais il ajoute qu’il est trop tôt pour conclure définitivement. Il est difficile de dire à partir de ces premiers résultats si la SV est bénéfique ou préjudiciable à la réponse immunitaire contre le SRAS-CoV-2, et les résultats des études préliminaires sont ouverts à l’interprétation. Hensley avertit que la simple mesure des niveaux d’anticorps ne fournit pas une image complète d’une réponse immunitaire complexe. Il pense également que la présence d’anticorps OC43 chez les personnes atteintes de COVID-19 pourrait indiquer qu’une infection récente à OC43 aide le système immunitaire à combattre le virus. En août, une étude portant sur des échantillons de travailleurs de la santé a montré que les personnes ayant des taux d’anticorps OC43 plus élevés, ce qui indique une exposition récente à OC43, se sont rétablies plus rapidement d’une infection par le SRAS-CoV-2(6) que ceux qui ont des niveaux inférieurs. D’autres recherches ont montré des effets protecteurs similaires. Dans une étude publiée en décembre 2020, George Kassiotis, immunologiste au Francis Crick Institute de Londres, a également constaté que les anticorps OC43 préexistants présentaient une réactivité au SRAS-Cov-2(7). À l’époque, il n’était pas sûr des implications, mais après avoir examiné les études publiées depuis, dit-il, « la plupart des preuves indiquent une contribution globale positive, pas négative ». García-Sastre suggère que même s’ils ne sont pas en mesure d’empêcher le SARS-CoV-2 de pénétrer dans les cellules, les anticorps OC43 pourraient déclencher le système immunitaire pour tuer les cellules infectées. Mises à jour sur les vaccins Une question clé est de savoir si ces observations peuvent aider à éclairer les futures stratégies de vaccination contre la COVID-19. Pour l’instant, les vaccins basés sur la version originale du coronavirus – signalés pour la première fois à Wuhan, en Chine, fin 2019 – protègent contre toutes les variantes connues, explique Kassiotis. L’empreinte réduit parfois l’efficacité des vaccins contre la grippe, selon Sarah Cobey, biologiste de l’évolution et chercheuse sur la grippe à l’Université de Chicago dans l’Illinois. Le vaccin contre la grippe est mis à jour chaque année pour protéger contre les souches qui, selon les chercheurs, sont les plus susceptibles d’être répandues. Le système immunitaire de certaines personnes ne voit toujours pas la mise à jour, dit Cobey, et cible toujours les parties du virus qui leur sont familières. « Il semble qu’ils ne soient pas vraiment en mesure de répondre à la chose pour laquelle nous avons soigneusement mis à jour le vaccin. » Il est possible que les futurs vaccins contre la COVID-19 adaptés aux nouvelles variantes connaissent des problèmes similaires. Hensley ne pense pas que ce soit probable, cependant. Dans une étude publiée en prépublication le mois dernier, lui et ses collègues ont rapporté que les gens ne produisent pas autant d’anticorps OC43 après avoir reçu un vaccin à ARN messager que lorsqu’ils sont infectés par le SRAS-CoV-2 lui-même(8). Cela pourrait être dû au fait que les vaccins à ARNm établissent une réponse immunitaire si efficace qu’ils peuvent contourner tout effet d’empreinte immunitaire. « Peut-être que dans le contexte des vaccins à ARNm, il n’y aura pas vraiment autant de biais en faveur des épitopes conservés. C’est l’espoir », dit Hensley. Thompson dit que le problème pourrait également être contourné dans les vaccins COVID-19 mis à jour en supprimant les épitopes partagés: « Vous pourriez facilement couper le domaine S2 ... ou fabriquer un vaccin ciblant uniquement le domaine de liaison aux récepteurs de la souche circulante la plus récente », dit-il. « Mais c’est vraiment hypothétique. » « Il y a probablement une interaction très compliquée entre l’infection saisonnière à coronavirus et l’issue de la maladie lors de l’infection par le SRAS-CoV-2 », explique Hensley. « Je ne pense pas que quoi que ce soit devrait être présenté comme un fait complet à ce stade. » doi: https://doi.org/10.1038/d41586-021-03087-0 Références : 1. Francis, T. Jr Proc. Am. Phil. Soc. 104, 572-578 (1960). : - JSTOR : https://www.jstor.org/stable/985534 2. Anderson, E.M. et al. Cell 184, 1858-1864 (2021). : - National Library of Medicine (NLM) : https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/33631096/ - Cell Press : https://www.cell.com/cell/fulltext/S0092-8674(21)00160-4?_returnURL=https%3A%2F%2Flinkinghub.elsevier.com%2Fretrieve%2Fpii%2FS0092867421001604%3Fshowall%3Dtrue - ScienceDirect : https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0092867421001604 3. Li, Y. et al. J. Exp. Med. 210, 1493–500 (2013). : Rockefeller University Press : https://rupress.org/jem/article/210/8/1493/41410/Immune-history-shapes-specificity-of-pandemic-H1N1 4. Aydillo, T. et al. Nature Commun. 12, 3781 (2021). : - National Library of Medicine (NLM) : https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/34145263/ - Nature : https://www.nature.com/articles/s41467-021-23977-1 5. McNaughton, A. L. et coll. Préimpression à medRxiv https://doi.org/10.1101/2021.05.04.2125657 (2021). (?plus disponible) 6. Gouma, S. et al. JCI Insight 6, e150449 (2021). : - Journal of Clinical Investigation : https://insight.jci.org/articles/view/150449 - Science : https://www.science.org/doi/full/10.1126/sciimmunol.abi6950 7. Ng, K. W. et al. Science 370, 1339-1343 (2020). : - National Library of Medicine (NLM) : https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/33159009/ - Science : https://www.science.org/doi/10.1126/science.abe1107 8. Anderson, E.M. et coll. Préimpression à medRxiv https://doi.org/10.1101/2021.09.30.21264363 (2021). - #Medrxiv : https://www.medrxiv.org/content/10.1101/2021.09.30.21264363v1 Publié le 18 Novembre 2021 par Rachel Brésil sur Nature Lien : https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-021-03087-0?utm_source=fbk_nat&utm_medium=social&utm_campaign=nature