Clicky

Rockefeller University Press

Rockefeller University Press We publish The Journal of Cell Biology, The Journal of Experimental Medicine, and The Journal of General Physiology. The Rockefeller University Press (RUP) is committed to quality and integrity in scientific publishing.

Our goal is to publish excellent science using the latest technologies. We carry out rigorous peer review, applying the highest standards of novelty, mechanistic insight, data integrity, and general interest. In the internet age, the ability to distribute information is no longer restricted to publishers, and everyone is overloaded with information. Thus, the current value of a scientific publishe

Our goal is to publish excellent science using the latest technologies. We carry out rigorous peer review, applying the highest standards of novelty, mechanistic insight, data integrity, and general interest. In the internet age, the ability to distribute information is no longer restricted to publishers, and everyone is overloaded with information. Thus, the current value of a scientific publishe

The Journal of Experimental Medicine (JEM) presents a special collection of recent JEM articles to accompany Keystone Sy...
03/24/2022
HIV Latency and Beyond | Journal of Experimental Medicine | Rockefeller University Press

The Journal of Experimental Medicine (JEM) presents a special collection of recent JEM articles to accompany Keystone Symposia "Next Generation HIV Vaccines and Therapies." The collection includes studies investigating the immune determinants of HIV-1 latency, analyses of neutralizing antibodies, and novel systems to investigate antiviral immunotherapies. We hope you enjoy reading the collection and welcome your feedback!

This special collection curated by the JEM editorial team includes studies investigating the immune determinants of HIV-1 latency, analyses of neutralizing antibodies and novel systems to investigate antiviral immunotherapies.

📢  COMING SOON in APRIL: JGP Call For Papers on the topic Ion Channels in Context: Structure and Function in Native Cell...
03/22/2022
Call for Papers: Ion Channels in Context | Journal of General Physiology | Rockefeller University Press

📢 COMING SOON in APRIL: JGP Call For Papers on the topic Ion Channels in Context: Structure and Function in Native Cells and Macromolecular Complexes, to be published throughout the year and highlighted in a special collection.

The review process will be overseen by JGP Associate Editors Jeanne Nerbonne and Crina Nimigean. They will be joined by subject experts Cathy Proenza and Matt Trudeau, organizers of the Society of General Physiologists' 75th Annual Symposium, which will take place September 7–11, 2022 in Woods Hole, Massachusetts.
Sign up for reminders 👇

Call for Papers: Ion Channels in Context | Journal of General Physiology | Rockefeller University Press

The Journal of Experimental Medicine (JEM) presents a special collection of clinical studies that focus on patients with...
03/15/2022
2022 Clinical Collection on Cancer | Journal of Experimental Medicine | Rockefeller University Press

The Journal of Experimental Medicine (JEM) presents a special collection of clinical studies that focus on patients with solid tumors or hematologic malignancies. These studies revolutionize our understanding of the origins and development of cancer, the influence of microbiota and the immune system, and new approaches to cancer treatment.

We hope you appreciate the collection and encourage your feedback! 👉

Here, we present a special collection of clinical studies that focus on patients with solid tumors or hematologic malignancies. These studies revolutionize our understanding of the origins and development of cancer, the influence of microbiota and the i...

Researchers at UCSF have discovered that cells carrying the most common mutation found in human cancer accumulate large ...
03/09/2022
Cancer cells’ iron addiction may enable specific drug targeting, study suggests

Researchers at UCSF have discovered that cells carrying the most common mutation found in human cancer accumulate large amounts of ferrous iron and that this “ferroaddiction” can be exploited to specifically deliver powerful anticancer drugs without harming normal, healthy cells. The therapeutic strategy, described in a study published today in the Journal of Experimental Medicine (JEM), could be used to treat a wide variety of cancers driven by mutations in the KRAS gene.
Read press release: https://bit.ly/3MDUmjN
Read original JEM study: https://bit.ly/34t17DD

Researchers at the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF), have discovered that cells carrying the most common mutation found in human cancer accumulate large amounts of ferrous iron and that this “ferroaddiction” can be exploited to specifically deliver powerful anticancer drugs without...

JGP's March cover shows an artistic reconstruction of a hippocampal pyramidal neuron transfected with biosensors for Ptd...
03/07/2022

JGP's March cover shows an artistic reconstruction of a hippocampal pyramidal neuron transfected with biosensors for PtdIns (yellow), PtdIns(4)P (cyan), and PtdIns(4,5)P2 (magenta). Images were taken from different experiments and transformed to fit one cell. The kinetic analysis by de la Cruz et al. (https://bit.ly/3s0pYHX) shows that neurons have a large PtdIns(4)P pool and synthesize PtdIns(4,5)P2 quickly.

Read JGP March Issue: https://bit.ly/3C5PK0W

JEM's March cover shows an artistic rendering using whole-mount images of the blood vessels that irrigate the small inte...
03/07/2022

JEM's March cover shows an artistic rendering using whole-mount images of the blood vessels that irrigate the small intestinal villi of a 10-d-old mouse. Blood vessels are immunostained with podocalyxin. Sinem Karaman and colleagues show that VEGFR1 & VEGFR3 can support vessel maintenance in the absence of VEGFR2 in an organ-specific manner in postnatal and adult mice. https://bit.ly/3rAoS4f
Read JEM March Issue: https://bit.ly/35MgpDN

On the cover of JCB's March Issue: Confocal projection of a fixed Drosophila embryo expressing endogenously YFP-tagged R...
03/07/2022

On the cover of JCB's March Issue: Confocal projection of a fixed Drosophila embryo expressing endogenously YFP-tagged Rab7 as marker for late endosomes (yellow), and stained for actin (phalloidin-ATTO647, white), the tracheal lumen (Chitin-binding protein-Alexa546, magenta), and nuclei (DAPI, blue). Late endosomes organize actin at the growing tip of tracheal terminal cells to regulate their morphogenesis. From Ríos-Barrera and Leptin (https://bit.ly/3FLbSxH).
Read JCB’s March Issue: https://bit.ly/3swCgYF

The Journal of Experimental Medicine (JEM) presents a special collection of recent research articles on the intersection...
03/03/2022
JEM Stroke Immunology Collection 2022 | Journal of Experimental Medicine | Rockefeller University Press

The Journal of Experimental Medicine (JEM) presents a special collection of recent research articles on the intersection of vascular biology and immunology covering a range of topics including neuroinflammation, innate immune subsets contribution to AAA and COVID-19 severity, immunotherapy, and vascular inflammation. We hope you enjoy reading the collection and encourage your feedback!

JEM Stroke Immunology Collection 2022 | Journal of Experimental Medicine | Rockefeller University Press

The Journal of Experimental Medicine (JEM) is pleased to present the second article for the Continuing Medical Education...
03/02/2022
Journal of Experimental Medicine (JEM) Journal-Based CME 2 - MSK CME - Continuing Education (CE)

The Journal of Experimental Medicine (JEM) is pleased to present the second article for the Continuing Medical Education (CME) program in collaboration with Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center.
CME course is now available here: https://bit.ly/3tkVaRF

Read "Epitope Convergence of Broadly HIV-1 Neutralizing IgA and IgG Antibody Lineages in a Viremic Controller" from Valérie Lorin, Hugo Mouquet et al. https://bit.ly/3K8e58Y

Accreditation:
This activity has been planned and implemented in accordance with the accreditation requirements and policies of the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) through the joint providership of Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, the Journal of Experimental Medicine (JEM) and Rockefeller University Press. Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

AMA Credit Designation Statement:
Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center designates this enduring material for a maximum of 1.00 AMA PRA Category 1 Credits™. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

MSK CME, Journal of Experimental Medicine (JEM) Journal-Based CME 2, 3/1/2022 10:00:00 AM - 12/1/2024 10:00:00 AM, The Journal of Experimental Medicine (JEM) publishes peer-reviewed papers within the field of medical biology, providing novel conceptual insights into immunology, cancer biology, ne...

The Journal of General Physiology (JGP) presents a special collection of recent biophysical research articles to accompa...
02/16/2022
Biophysics 2022 | Journal of General Physiology | Rockefeller University Press

The Journal of General Physiology (JGP) presents a special collection of recent biophysical research articles to accompany the Biophysical Society's 66th Annual Meeting (BPS 2022). The collection covers a wide range of biophysical topics from the mechanisms of ion channel gating in the nervous system as well as cardiac and skeletal muscle to mechanosensation and the structure and regulation of proteins in the sarcomere. We hope you enjoy reading the collection, and welcome your feedback!

02/15/2022
Researchers Identify Novel PARP-like Enzyme in Mitochondria | School of Medicine

For the first time, researchers at Boston University have identified an ADP-ribosyltransferase enzyme that is active in the mitochondria and characterized its activity. https://www.bumc.bu.edu/busm/2022/02/15/researchers-identify-novel-parp-like-enzyme-in-mitochondria/

See original JCB paper here 👉 https://bit.ly/3oN6dBy

Researchers Identify Novel PARP-like Enzyme in Mitochondria For the first time, BUSM researchers have identified an ADP-ribosyltransferase enzyme that is active in the mitochondria (the organelle that generate most of the chemical energy needed to power biochemical reactions in cells) and characteri...

How do you know if you should flip your journal to #OpenAccess, and then how do you make it happen? Join Society for Sch...
02/11/2022
Event Display_NP_Donate

How do you know if you should flip your journal to #OpenAccess, and then how do you make it happen? Join Society for Scholarly Publishing (SSP)'s webinar on February 24, 11AM (EST) – Our Executive Director Susan King will be speaking.
Register to the webinar here: https://customer.sspnet.org/ssp/Events/ssp/EventDisplayNPGF.aspx?EventKey=WEB220216 #OA

How do you know if you should flip your journal to OA, and then how do you make it happen? Our panel will discuss the key metrics that support the decision to flip as well as the process required to make the transition a success.

On JGP's February cover, Boukens and colleagues show that changes in ventricular repolarization in ball pythons occur du...
02/07/2022

On JGP's February cover, Boukens and colleagues show that changes in ventricular repolarization in ball pythons occur during increasing body temperatures. This, however, is caused by increased tone of the sympathetic nervous system, indicating that repolarization in pythons and mammals is modulated by evolutionary conserved mechanisms involving catecholaminergic stimulation (https://bit.ly/3oWPzA0).

Read JGP February Issue: https://bit.ly/3giQwNW

JEM's February cover shows a spleen section immunostained for CD4 (dark blue), IgD (magenta), and GL7 (light blue) from ...
02/07/2022

JEM's February cover shows a spleen section immunostained for CD4 (dark blue), IgD (magenta), and GL7 (light blue) from mice that recovered from Plasmodium yoelii nonlethal infection on day 35 after infection. Lee et al. identify unexpected role of TBK1 as a crucial B cell intrinsic factor for germinal center formation (https://bit.ly/3dU0wvV).

Read JEM’s February Issue: https://bit.ly/3GmWesH

On the cover of JCB February Issue: Airyscan confocal imaging of fission yeast cells shows colocalization of the conserv...
02/07/2022

On the cover of JCB February Issue: Airyscan confocal imaging of fission yeast cells shows colocalization of the conserved GTPase Arf6-mNG (cyan) and the cell cycle regulator Cdr2-mCherry (magenta) at plasma membrane nodes. Opalko et al. show that membrane-bound Arf6 tethers Cdr2 at these nodes to promote cell size–dependent entry into mitosis (https://bit.ly/3FUUuaI).

Read JCB’s February Issue: https://bit.ly/3L3v6CC

PIK3CA-related overgrowth spectrum (PROS) is a group of rare, incurable disorders caused by mutations in the PIK3CA gene...
01/26/2022
Cancer drug shows promise in treating infants with rare disease that causes tissue overgrowth

PIK3CA-related overgrowth spectrum (PROS) is a group of rare, incurable disorders caused by mutations in the PIK3CA gene that result in the malformation and overgrowth of various parts of the body. A new report published today in the Journal of Experimental Medicine (JEM) describes the successful treatment of two young infants with PROS using the breast cancer drug alpelisib.

Press Release: https://bit.ly/3u2oajg
Original JEM study: https://bit.ly/33TyTS7

PIK3CA-related overgrowth spectrum (PROS) is a group of rare, incurable disorders caused by mutations in the PIK3CA gene that result in the malformation and overgrowth of various parts of the body. A new report to be published January 26 in the Journal of Experimental Medicine (JEM) describes the su...

The Journal of Experimental Medicine (JEM) presents a special collection of recent immunology research articles to coinc...
01/19/2022
Immunology Update Winter 2022 | Journal of Experimental Medicine | Rockefeller University Press

The Journal of Experimental Medicine (JEM) presents a special collection of recent immunology research articles to coincide with the 60th Midwinter Conference of Immunologists at Asilomar. The articles cover a wide range of topics including neuroinflammation, T and B lymphocyte activation, immune cell residency and differentiation, inflammation, host-parasite interaction and mucosal immunology in the intestine and skin.

We hope you enjoy reading the collection and encourage your feedback!

We are pleased to present a special collection of recent immunology research articles covering a wide range of topics including neuroinflammation, T and B lymphocyte activation, immune cell residency and differentiation, inflammation, host-parasite inte...

JGP's January cover shows structures of human-ASIC1a in open (blue) superimposed onto resting (tan) conformation obtaine...
01/03/2022

JGP's January cover shows structures of human-ASIC1a in open (blue) superimposed onto resting (tan) conformation obtained by fitting existing structures of chicken-ASIC1 together with computational modeling. Gating repositions functionally essential residues in the lower pore and defines the GAS belt as the narrowest segment of the pore, establishing its central role in ion selectivity.
From Chen et al (https://bit.ly/3Ca13Ud).

Read JGP's January Issue: https://bit.ly/3mqWWhB

Address

950 3rd Ave
New York, NY
10022

General information

The Rockefeller University Press (RUP) is committed to quality and integrity in scientific publishing. Our goal is to publish excellent science using the latest technologies. We carry out rigorous peer review, applying the highest standards of novelty, mechanistic insight, data integrity, and general interest.

Telephone

(212) 327-7938

Products

RUP publishes The Journal of Cell Biology, The Journal of Experimental Medicine, and The Journal of General Physiology.

Visit the RUP Store for information about books, videos, subscriptions, and posters: http://www.rupress.org/site/subscriptions/store.xhtml

Alerts

Be the first to know and let us send you an email when Rockefeller University Press posts news and promotions. Your email address will not be used for any other purpose, and you can unsubscribe at any time.

Contact The Business

Send a message to Rockefeller University Press:

Videos

Category

Nearby media companies


Comments

Our content partnerships with open access publishers like Rockefeller University Press help researchers have a smoother discovery process and give authors more insights into the impact of their work. Learn how: https://bit.ly/3qkbXCR #OpenAccess #ResearchGate
When we first announced our content partnerships with open access publishers like Rockefeller University Press , many of our members asked how this would help them. If the content is open access anyway, what difference would it make? https://bit.ly/3qkbXCR #OpenAccess #ResearchGate #partnership
Thanks to our partnership with Rockefeller University Press, researchers can now access 2,800 open access articles from Journal of Cell Biology, Journal of Experimental Medicine, and Journal of General Physiology on ResearchGate. Read more about it: https://bit.ly/3xoxIop #OpenAccess #ResearchGate #partnership
Thanks to our partnership with Rockefeller University Press , researchers can now access 2,800 open access articles from Journal of Cell Biology, Journal of Experimental Medicine, and Journal of General Physiology on ResearchGate. The future of academic publishing is open! https://bit.ly/3xoxIop #OpenAccess #ResearchGate #partnership
Les rhumes infantiles aident-ils le corps à réagir à la COVID? Un mécanisme connu sous le nom de «péché originel antigénique» protège certaines personnes de la grippe; on ne sait toujours pas si cela aide les réactions immunitaires aux coronavirus. Certaines personnes sont plus douées pour combattre la grippe saisonnière lorsque la souche du virus de la grippe est similaire à la première qu’elles ont rencontrée dans l’enfance – un phénomène appelé de manière évocatrice «péché originel antigénique», , également connu sous le nom «d'effet Hoskins». Maintenant, il y a de plus en plus de preuves que les réponses immunitaires des gens à covid-19 pourraient être façonnées de la même manière par des infections antérieures par des coronavirus du rhume. L’effet pourrait avoir des implications pour la conception des futurs vaccins contre la COVID-19. Cependant, on ne sait toujours pas dans quelle mesure il affecte les personnes atteintes de la COVID-19 – et s’il offre une protection accrue ou, en fait, entrave la réponse immunitaire. « Le débat est assez polarisé en ce moment », explique Craig Thompson, virologue à l’Université d’Oxford, au Royaume-Uni. L'effet Hoskins – également appelée empreinte immunitaire – a été caractérisée pour la première fois en 1960 par l’épidémiologiste américain Thomas Francis Jr, qui a remarqué que le système immunitaire semblait être programmé en permanence pour produire des anticorps contre la première souche d’un virus de la grippe qu’il a rencontré(1). Les cellules immunitaires se réactivent lorsque le corps est infecté par un virus de la grippe qui partage des régions, ou « épitopes », avec cette première souche. Pour le SRAS-CoV-2, il existe de plus en plus de preuves que l’exposition à d’autres coronavirus – y compris ceux qui causent le rhume et d’autres maladies respiratoires – joue un rôle dans les réponses immunitaires des personnes. « Tout comme la grippe, la plupart d’entre nous sont infectés par ces coronavirus courants à l’âge de cinq ou six ans », explique Scott Hensley, microbiologiste à l’Université de Pennsylvanie à Philadelphie. Son groupe a découvert que des échantillons de sérum sanguin prélevés sur des personnes avant la pandémie contenaient des anticorps contre un coronavirus du rhume appelé OC43 qui pourrait se lier à la protéine de pointe du SRAS-Cov-2(2). En utilisant des échantillons prélevés avant et après l’infection par le SRAS-CoV-2, Hensley et ses collègues ont pu montrer que la capture du SARS-CoV-2 augmentait la production d’anticorps se liant à l’OC43. Leur étude, publiée en avril, a révélé que ces anticorps se luxaient à la sous-unité S2 de la protéine de pointe du SARS-CoV-2 – qui a une structure similaire à celle de l’OC43. Mais les anticorps OC43 ne se sont pas liés à la région S1 du pic du SRAS-CoV-2 et ont été incapables d’empêcher le virus de pénétrer dans les cellules. Effets de l’impression Dans certains cas, l’impression est connue pour avoir un effet positif sur l’immunité. Hensley et ses collègues ont étudié les effets de l’empreinte pendant la pandémie de grippe H1N1 de 2009 et ont constaté que l’exposition à certaines souches de grippe historiques offrait une protection contre l’infection par le H1N1.(3). « Il y avait des épitopes dans ce virus qui ont été conservés avec les souches de grippe saisonnière passées », explique Hensley. « Le rappel des réponses d’anticorps contre ces épitopes a été bénéfique. » Mais la SV présente également des inconvénients potentiels. Parfois, les anticorps produits à la suite de l’impression ne correspondent pas très bien au virus à l’origine d’une infection, mais leur production supprime l’activation des cellules B naïves qui produiraient autrement des anticorps plus protecteurs. « Vous obtenez une réponse qui peut être biaisée vers les antigènes conservés par rapport aux nouveaux antigènes », explique Adolfo García-Sastre, directeur du Global Health and Emerging Pathogens Institute à l’École de médecine Icahn du mont Sinaï à New York. Cela peut diminuer la capacité du système immunitaire à combattre la nouvelle infection. García-Sastre a examiné les réponses immunitaires précoces des personnes hospitalisées pour COVID-19 en Espagne et a observé une augmentation des niveaux d’anticorps contre OC43 et un autre bêtacoronavirus, appelé HKU1, qui partageait des épitopes avec le SRAS-CoV-2(4). « Nous avons cherché une corrélation entre les personnes qui montent des [niveaux] d’anticorps plus élevés contre ces épitopes conservés par rapport à une immunité moins protectrice contre le SRAS-COV-2, et il y avait une légère corrélation », explique García-Sastre. Des signes d’impact négatif sur la SV chez les personnes atteintes de COVID-19 ont également été observés par Thompson et ses collègues, dans une prépublication publiée plus tôt cette année(5). L’analyse était basée sur des échantillons prélevés en 2020 auprès de personnes au Royaume-Uni présentant des infections asymptomatiques et de personnes admises à l’hôpital pour une GRAVE COVID-19, dont la moitié est décédée par la suite. Les chercheurs ont constaté que les personnes décédées produisaient moins d’anticorps contre la protéine de pointe du SRAS-CoV-2 que les personnes qui avaient survécu, mais produisaient la même quantité d’anticorps contre une autre protéine présente dans le virus – la protéine nucléocapside. Thompson dit que ces résultats indiquent que les souvenirs imprimés de la protéine de pointe d’un autre coronavirus pourraient empêcher une réponse immunitaire plus efficace chez ceux qui n’ont pas survécu. «C’est une empreinte digitale de l’effet Hoskins», dit-il. Mais il ajoute qu’il est trop tôt pour conclure définitivement. Il est difficile de dire à partir de ces premiers résultats si la SV est bénéfique ou préjudiciable à la réponse immunitaire contre le SRAS-CoV-2, et les résultats des études préliminaires sont ouverts à l’interprétation. Hensley avertit que la simple mesure des niveaux d’anticorps ne fournit pas une image complète d’une réponse immunitaire complexe. Il pense également que la présence d’anticorps OC43 chez les personnes atteintes de COVID-19 pourrait indiquer qu’une infection récente à OC43 aide le système immunitaire à combattre le virus. En août, une étude portant sur des échantillons de travailleurs de la santé a montré que les personnes ayant des taux d’anticorps OC43 plus élevés, ce qui indique une exposition récente à OC43, se sont rétablies plus rapidement d’une infection par le SRAS-CoV-2(6) que ceux qui ont des niveaux inférieurs. D’autres recherches ont montré des effets protecteurs similaires. Dans une étude publiée en décembre 2020, George Kassiotis, immunologiste au Francis Crick Institute de Londres, a également constaté que les anticorps OC43 préexistants présentaient une réactivité au SRAS-Cov-2(7). À l’époque, il n’était pas sûr des implications, mais après avoir examiné les études publiées depuis, dit-il, « la plupart des preuves indiquent une contribution globale positive, pas négative ». García-Sastre suggère que même s’ils ne sont pas en mesure d’empêcher le SARS-CoV-2 de pénétrer dans les cellules, les anticorps OC43 pourraient déclencher le système immunitaire pour tuer les cellules infectées. Mises à jour sur les vaccins Une question clé est de savoir si ces observations peuvent aider à éclairer les futures stratégies de vaccination contre la COVID-19. Pour l’instant, les vaccins basés sur la version originale du coronavirus – signalés pour la première fois à Wuhan, en Chine, fin 2019 – protègent contre toutes les variantes connues, explique Kassiotis. L’empreinte réduit parfois l’efficacité des vaccins contre la grippe, selon Sarah Cobey, biologiste de l’évolution et chercheuse sur la grippe à l’Université de Chicago dans l’Illinois. Le vaccin contre la grippe est mis à jour chaque année pour protéger contre les souches qui, selon les chercheurs, sont les plus susceptibles d’être répandues. Le système immunitaire de certaines personnes ne voit toujours pas la mise à jour, dit Cobey, et cible toujours les parties du virus qui leur sont familières. « Il semble qu’ils ne soient pas vraiment en mesure de répondre à la chose pour laquelle nous avons soigneusement mis à jour le vaccin. » Il est possible que les futurs vaccins contre la COVID-19 adaptés aux nouvelles variantes connaissent des problèmes similaires. Hensley ne pense pas que ce soit probable, cependant. Dans une étude publiée en prépublication le mois dernier, lui et ses collègues ont rapporté que les gens ne produisent pas autant d’anticorps OC43 après avoir reçu un vaccin à ARN messager que lorsqu’ils sont infectés par le SRAS-CoV-2 lui-même(8). Cela pourrait être dû au fait que les vaccins à ARNm établissent une réponse immunitaire si efficace qu’ils peuvent contourner tout effet d’empreinte immunitaire. « Peut-être que dans le contexte des vaccins à ARNm, il n’y aura pas vraiment autant de biais en faveur des épitopes conservés. C’est l’espoir », dit Hensley. Thompson dit que le problème pourrait également être contourné dans les vaccins COVID-19 mis à jour en supprimant les épitopes partagés: « Vous pourriez facilement couper le domaine S2 ... ou fabriquer un vaccin ciblant uniquement le domaine de liaison aux récepteurs de la souche circulante la plus récente », dit-il. « Mais c’est vraiment hypothétique. » « Il y a probablement une interaction très compliquée entre l’infection saisonnière à coronavirus et l’issue de la maladie lors de l’infection par le SRAS-CoV-2 », explique Hensley. « Je ne pense pas que quoi que ce soit devrait être présenté comme un fait complet à ce stade. » doi: https://doi.org/10.1038/d41586-021-03087-0 Références : 1. Francis, T. Jr Proc. Am. Phil. Soc. 104, 572-578 (1960). : - JSTOR : https://www.jstor.org/stable/985534 2. Anderson, E.M. et al. Cell 184, 1858-1864 (2021). : - National Library of Medicine (NLM) : https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/33631096/ - Cell Press : https://www.cell.com/cell/fulltext/S0092-8674(21)00160-4?_returnURL=https%3A%2F%2Flinkinghub.elsevier.com%2Fretrieve%2Fpii%2FS0092867421001604%3Fshowall%3Dtrue - ScienceDirect : https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0092867421001604 3. Li, Y. et al. J. Exp. Med. 210, 1493–500 (2013). : Rockefeller University Press : https://rupress.org/jem/article/210/8/1493/41410/Immune-history-shapes-specificity-of-pandemic-H1N1 4. Aydillo, T. et al. Nature Commun. 12, 3781 (2021). : - National Library of Medicine (NLM) : https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/34145263/ - Nature : https://www.nature.com/articles/s41467-021-23977-1 5. McNaughton, A. L. et coll. Préimpression à medRxiv https://doi.org/10.1101/2021.05.04.2125657 (2021). (?plus disponible) 6. Gouma, S. et al. JCI Insight 6, e150449 (2021). : - Journal of Clinical Investigation : https://insight.jci.org/articles/view/150449 - Science : https://www.science.org/doi/full/10.1126/sciimmunol.abi6950 7. Ng, K. W. et al. Science 370, 1339-1343 (2020). : - National Library of Medicine (NLM) : https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/33159009/ - Science : https://www.science.org/doi/10.1126/science.abe1107 8. Anderson, E.M. et coll. Préimpression à medRxiv https://doi.org/10.1101/2021.09.30.21264363 (2021). - #Medrxiv : https://www.medrxiv.org/content/10.1101/2021.09.30.21264363v1 Publié le 18 Novembre 2021 par Rachel Brésil sur Nature Lien : https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-021-03087-0?utm_source=fbk_nat&utm_medium=social&utm_campaign=nature