Hilton Media Management HMM LLC

Hilton Media Management  HMM LLC Production and Post-Production Services www.HiltonMM.com

Film and Broadcast Services www.HiltonMM.com

06/05/2017

Our current feature project list:
SOJOURN
LAW DOGS
ATTACK ON ASHVILLE
NIGHT FALL
CAPITAL OFFENSE
THE CONTRACTORS
NEW HMPSHIRE DAZE

It's our last week of KICKSTARTER - We've got 4 Videos up, lots of photos and we're asking for your support and assistan...
06/24/2013
SUBCONSCIOUS feature film

It's our last week of KICKSTARTER - We've got 4 Videos up, lots of photos and we're asking for your support and assistance in making our goal. This is a good project for a great cause. Help us make a movie to support Veterans! ( and have some fun in the process) The film is by a Veteran, with Veteran cast and crew! It's our last week of KICKSTARTER - We've got 4 Videos up, lots of photos and we're asking for your support and assistance in making our goal. This is a good project for a great cause. Help us make a movie to support Veterans! ( and have some fun in the process) The film is by a Veteran, with Veteran cast and crew!
http://www.kickstarter.com/projects/2103655780/subconscious-feature-film
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In 2014 Peter and his team investigate a WWII submarine that holds a dark secret which could alter the course of history itself.

New updates to our KICKSTARTER project!   Remember we need YOUR help to make this film, please donate today - every doll...
06/08/2013
SUBCONSCIOUS feature film

New updates to our KICKSTARTER project! Remember we need YOUR help to make this film, please donate today - every dollar helps!

SUBCONSCIOUS is UP and LAUNCHED. Feel free to tell EVERYONE and then EVERYONE’s FRIENDS! join the crew of SUBCONSCIOUS...
06/01/2013
SUBCONSCIOUS feature film

SUBCONSCIOUS is UP and LAUNCHED. Feel free to tell EVERYONE and then EVERYONE’s FRIENDS! join the crew of SUBCONSCIOUS today!

HERE's the official link!

http://www.kickstarter.com/projects/2103655780/subconscious-feature-film

Subconscious is a Veteran created project, with Veterans on the crew, Veterans in the cast, Veteran family members, - Dedicated to US, UK, and Aussie Veterans and we’re donating to non-profit veterans ogranizations and non-profit veteran memorials.... And we’re filming on board a United States National Historic Location the USS Lionfish, The USS Massachusetts, and the USS Joseph P Kennedy.

"American Horror" on a Submarine. SciFi Thriller... Peter and his team time-travel back to WW II in search of his missing Grandfather.

Going LIVE TOMORROW at 1PM east coast time! Join our team - lets make a great movie with Veterans and for Veterans and Y...
05/31/2013
Subconscious

Going LIVE TOMORROW at 1PM east coast time! Join our team - lets make a great movie with Veterans and for Veterans and YOU !

05/25/2013
Subconscious

Subconscious

SUBCONSCIOUS SUPPORTS OUR VETS this memorial day and all the other 364 days of the year. We're a Veteran run, and Veteran filled project ! And we're donating 25% of our profits directly to US and UK veterans organizations and non-profit military memorial groups!

03/29/2013

THe NY credit program was extended for five additional years (through calendar year 2019)

Effective from 2015-2019, the allocation for the Post Tax incentive increases from $7million per year to $25 million per year.
$5million per year has been allocated for an additional 10% credit on below the line labor in specific upstate counties.
For productions that filmed in NYS-effective immediately, all qualifying post production costs are credit-eligible. (no more 75% threshold on post spend if production was here)
For productions that DID NOT film in NYS, the VFX and Animation threshold has been lowered to the lesser of 20% or $3million. EFFECTIVE IMMEDIATELY.

03/12/2013

here's another simply trick to polish your stick mounted camera pan and "up" your production value. Set up your shot , set up your camera just like you would for a traditional camera pan. Then Instead of using your HAND to move the camera (and all the not so smooth motion that ensues) take a very large rubber band, place it on the end of the tripod head handle. pull the rubber band instead of touching the handle with your hand. As you pull the rubber band, it will begin to stretch, and move the camera very smoothly as you continue to pull on the rubber band. The rubber band acts as a shock absorber and allow the camera to gently pan. Be aware that due to the extra "pull" required, you will need to tighten up the pressure on the head's pan so that it requires a bit more "pull" to move.

Hey Producers - Ever want that wicked cool camera move and you've only got $10K or $20K in your budget... Here are a cou...
03/12/2013
Jib Arms, Jib Systems - Full Compass

Hey Producers - Ever want that wicked cool camera move and you've only got $10K or $20K in your budget... Here are a couple ideas.... producing
Have you ever watched an amazing camera move in a big action film and first wondered how they did it, and then wished you could get a shot like that? Here's some thoughts for you. Utilizing the traditional "sticks" and hand held always works for stuff and is always on the table. But what about a couple other fun ways to "up" the production value of your project with slick, fun, or simply a shot that you really want because its the "right" shot... JIB: Lets start with a jib. This little baby is a wonderful cheap way of getting a lot of shots done, quickly, easily and with some really nice "upped" production feel. I own a 6 foot jib that mounts on a set of "sticks" that we can set up , drop on and start shooting in a matter of minutes. It allows me to track around in a 12 foot area all the way around in a circle, and up and down from the floor to about 8 feet off the ground ( including tripod height ). Managing the jib and "driving" the camera like a handheld is a simple way to do this. What you get is the feel of a number of more expensive items. The Jib arm allows you to steady the camera and creates a very nice smooth "steady cam" look, it allows you to give the apparence of a nice tracked shot, and of course a traditional Jib shot. The best part is you can buy a 6 foot jib arm for around $1000 or rent one for a couple hundred. It goes up from there. The largest Jib i've used is around 24 feet. They can go much bigger, but for the indie world stick to around 6' to 24'. Using a jib can really add to the look of a film and give you the camera moves that would otherwise be out of reach physically or financially. If you've ever used a dolly and track, especially cheap dolly and track... you'll immediately see the value of a jib. Extremely faster set up, easier to move, 90% of the tracking shots can be replaced with a jib and a little practice. Its a great tool for a low budget film to add that ever elusive production value. Here are a couple links to jib arms:
http://www.fullcompass.com/category/Jib-Arms-Jib-Systems.html
http://jimmyjib.com/jjlite.html

WIRE CAM: here's another fun toy, and this one you can build at home for under $100. It's a wire cam. Basically a wire cam is simply a wire or cord stretched between to points with a small dolly platform (just big enough for your camera) hanging from the cord. The dolly rides on a couple of wheels down the wire. These can be built with simple PVC pipes or constructed with metal... The wire can be simple clothesline cord or a metal wire.. You can build these as simple as you want or as complex... But heres the fun part. Once the camera is on the wire cam and balanced you can "drive" the camera holding it , or you can push it and liet it roll on it's own. You can set up one end of the wire a bit higher than the other and let gravity drive the camera. You can shoot down the length of the wire in the direction of camera movement, or you can track backwards. You can also shoot sideways and, again, get those time consuming dolly shots... One of the tricks of using a wire cam is to have a few "extension" pieces for the dolly to allow you to lift the wire 1 foot or 10 feet above the camera. Just be careful of having proper counter weights to balance and smooth the camera and make sure your wire system can handle the weight. If you are using a heavy camera or a lot of weight you may want to consider using 2 wires and a dolly that mounts and rides on both. Again. you can make this as complex or as simple as you want or need and you'll get some really fun shots cheap, once again "upping" your production value. Here are a couple links to get you started with Wire Cams...
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6y9WXRpxjC8
http://filmmakeriq.com/2008/12/how-to-make-a-diy-cable-cam-for-cheap/ http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=v4umhOolZPU

Audio, Video and Lighting equipment for all your AV needs. Our catalog has over 20,000 products from over 500 manufacturers.

03/05/2013

So you want to be a Producer.... Do you really know the skill set?
I was asked by a young budding Film Maker what she needed to do to be a Producer. So here's what I suggested...

You need the following tool set to be a good producer:
FIRST and FOREMOST: You need to be a Project Manager. A Project Manager is someone who is responsible for planning, execution, completing, and delivering a Project... on BUDGET and on TIME. It's ALL your fault and ALL your responsibility.
Along with this you need to be good at Financial Planning and Financial management. You need to be able to work up REAL and DO-ABLE budgets. You need to be able to pull together Cost benefit analysis and ROI (Return on Investment) documents.
You need to be an author and Librarian... You need to be able to create business plans, summaries, Producer packages, deal memos, write letters, memos, and generally manage documents.
You need to be a Researcher, on just about any topic, from finding out the cost and return of films like your project, to what color was the dress, what years was the car, who batted 3rd in the 1957 world series, what actor was the best box office draw for the part you are trying to fill, who's the agent for 3 other actors, where can I find a sound stage, what the best camera package for my project, how come the sound didn't sync in post and what do I do to fix it.....
You need to be a GREAT listener. You'll be listening to Investors, your crew, your actors, other producers, other managers, agents, everyone... AND EVERYONE has some nugget of wisdom or information that will be valuable to you.

You need to be MOM, DAD, the DRILL SERGEANT, the PRIEST, the SHRINK, and just about every other support entity to your cast and crew during your project's life cycle.
You need to be able to think 3 steps ahead and know when something in your project is heading for trouble and steer the ship around it, or be able to triage the problem without losing your cool.
You have to be the Captain of the ship..YOU ALWAYS HAVE THE ANSWER, YOU NEVER EVER EVER - DON'T KNOW".....If you Don't know, then you have to be able to find out and in the meantime pretend to have the answer. You need to be the ROCK that everyone else hangs on to when things get dicey.
You have to have thick skin... because everything that goes wrong is your fault and your problem.
You have to be a Pitchman, Salesman, a gospel waving revival preacher.... so you can sell your project to other producers, your crew, your cast, the investors, the produce placement folk, the composers, the editors, the distributors, the networks, the... well... basically everyone...

You need to know every positions and every positions job and how to do it. so you don't get bullsh*tted and lied to. You have to be able to know the right size crew for the project size you are pulling together.
You have to understand the LAW and be able to deal with lawyers, and contracts.

You have to be a Hostage Negotiator. You're going to have your film help hostage by a lot of people at some point or another... The Unions, SAG, pissed off next door neighbors of your set, the local cops, the fire department, the pissed off crew, and crazy actor, pay issues, food issues, an extra hour of shooting tonight and you've already gone 12 hours... you name it.. there's always something that needs negotiating.
You also need to understand the entire process path and project lifecycle of a film/broadcast project.
You have to be able to READ a Script. And reading a script is not "reading" a script, it's READING a script... you have to be able to completely understand the scenes, break down every aspect in your head instantly... What Kind of location, How big a crew, how many cast, what actor type, how long will it take to set up the location, what pros are needed, how much lighting and how long will it take to setup, where will you find the location, how far away is this location form the next one and what will it cost to move the company in time and money, how will people get there, where will the trucks park, how are you feeding the crew... what's the cost of the stunts involved, and the insurance issues. What can go wrong with this scene? AND, you have to do that for EVERY scene in the script... envisioning the breakdowns as you read.
You have to be able to take all of this and develop a budget, pull a team together, soft-sell the writer into changes, reign in or motivate the Director, and generally keep things moving.
You have to understand all the technology so that you are picking the right cameras, lighting package, post production work flow, when something should be shot practical or done in post. How to shoot around that dangerous stunt in roder to stay in budget and make the director happy.
You have to be able to make friends and contacts all the time. You'll need 'em... trust me...
You need to be able to sort out what needs to be done, what can be done and what shouldn't be done to get a project completed on budget and on time and not mess it up.
You need to understand the post-production work flow and process, so you know when and where to save a buck, spend a buck and how to stretch your post budget to make your $20K film look like $500K, your $500K film look like $1M and your $1M film look like a $5M film.

You have to balance ART and BUSINESS and somehow, through all of this, make your project make money.

cheers
geo

http://georgiahilton.com/blog-and-info/My film production and post production blog. Everything from development to distr...
02/23/2013
Georgia Hilton Bog | Georgia Hilton

http://georgiahilton.com/blog-and-info/

My film production and post production blog. Everything from development to distribution.

New York based Post Production Services for Independent Filmmakers, Corporate video, features, broadcast, including picture, audio, After Effects, coaching,and visual FX, using FinalCut, AVID, ProTools, and Cinema4D. 24/7 service,

01/31/2013

New York state increased the Empire State film post-production tax credit from 10 percent to 30 percent (for post-production facilities in New York City or Dutchess, Nassau, Orange, Putnam, Rockland, Suffolk and Westchester counties) and 35 percent (for post-production facilities in other counties) of the post-production costs paid in the production of a qualified film at such a post-production facility. Qualified film production companies that are ineligible for the Empire State film production credit may qualify for the post-production credit.

To qualify for the post-production credit, (1) the taxpayer must be a qualified film production company, and (2) post-production costs paid or incurred in the post-production of the qualified film at a New York state post-production facility must be at least 75 percent of the total post-production costs paid or incurred in the post-production of the qualified film at any post-production facility.

A qualified film production company is a corporation, partnership, limited partnership or other entity or individual that is principally engaged in the production of a qualified film and controls the qualified film during production.

A qualified film is a feature-length film, television film, television pilot or each episode of a television series, regardless of the medium by means of which the film, pilot or episode is created or conveyed, but does not include a documentary film, news or current affairs program, interview or talk program, “how-to” (i.e., instructional) film or program, film or program consisting primarily of stock footage, sporting event or sporting program, game show, award ceremony, film or program intended primarily for industrial, corporate or institutional end-users, fundraising film or program, daytime drama (i.e., daytime “soap opera”), commercials, music videos or “reality” program, or a production that contains sexually explicit conduct.

Post-production costs are costs for production of original content for a qualified film employing traditional, emerging and new workflow techniques used in post-production for picture, sound and music editorial, rerecording and mixing, visual effects, graphic design, original scoring, animation, and music composition, excluding the editing of previously produced content for a qualified film.

HILTON MEDIA MANAGEMENT is located in New York City and welcomes MADE IN NEW YORK projects, as well as, other from outside New York.

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