Poets & Writers

Poets & Writers Supporting creative writers since 1970!
Founded in 1970, Poets & Writers is respected and trusted as the primary source of information, support, and guidance for poets, fiction writers, and creative nonfiction writers. Our work is rooted in the belief that literature is vital to sustaining a vibrant culture. We focus on nurturing literature’s source: creative writers. Our mission is to foster the professional development of poets and writers, to promote communication throughout the literary community, and to help create an environment in which literature can be appreciated by the widest possible public. We advance our mission through our flagship publication, Poets & Writers Magazine; pw.org, a website that provides trustworthy advice, information, and a lively online community for writers; the Readings/Workshops Program, which pays writers fees for giving readings and leading workshops throughout New York and California, as well as in eight cities outside those states; and awards for writers including the $50,000 Jackson Poetry Prize, the Maureen Egen Writers Exchange Award, and the Amy Award. Learn more at pw.org.
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What are the basic building blocks of a successful marketing campaign? How can authors leverage their publisher’s effort...
05/10/2020
Inside Publishing: The Book Marketer

What are the basic building blocks of a successful marketing campaign? How can authors leverage their publisher’s efforts to promote and market their books? Top marketers from across the industry weigh in:

In the latest installment of a yearlong series on publishing professionals, four book marketers explain how they use advertising, social media, and other platforms to boost awareness about their titles.

#FromTheArchive: “Poetry is performance.” In our #WritersRecommend series, Jericho Brown recalls footage of The Supremes...
05/10/2020
Jericho Brown

#FromTheArchive: “Poetry is performance.” In our #WritersRecommend series, Jericho Brown recalls footage of The Supremes on The Ed Sullivan Show and recommends “watching this to learn writing with focus...and grace.”

“One of the seventeen times the Supremes appeared on The Ed Sullivan Show, they sang ‘You Can’t Hurry Love’ wearing earrings that weighed close to what Diana Ross weighed at the time. At some point in the song, one of Ross’s earrings dangles and falls. What does she do? She keeps singing l...

“They held the funeral at night after the work was done, and though they were tired they danced and though they had sorr...
05/09/2020
Conjure Women by Afia Atakora

“They held the funeral at night after the work was done, and though they were tired they danced and though they had sorrow they sang.” Afia Atakora’s reading from Conjure Women (Random House) gives us chills! #PageOneAudio:

Afia Atakora reads from her novel, Conjure Women, published in April 2020 by Random House.

Poetry Prompt: Compose a poem in the form and style of a postcard note. Keep the length brief, and give the recipient a ...
05/09/2020
Postcard Poem

Poetry Prompt: Compose a poem in the form and style of a postcard note. Keep the length brief, and give the recipient a sense of the place you’re visiting or the space you’re occupying, whether imagined or real. For more writing prompts, visit the Time Is Now! #PWWritingPrompts #FromTheArchive

Compose a poem in the form and style of a postcard note. Keep the length brief, and give the recipient a sense of the place you’re visiting or the space you’re occupying. The location from which you write can be imagined or real. Alternatively, buy a postcard, and try to write a poem based on th...

“Looking down from the window / into the bare augur sycamore tree / in the park across the street / the surprise is how ...
05/09/2020
Poets House Presents: Ed Roberson

“Looking down from the window / into the bare augur sycamore tree / in the park across the street / the surprise is how full / of red-winged blackbirds it is…” In this Poets House Presents video, Ed Roberson shares new and unpublished poems still in drafts written during the coronavirus pandemic from his home in Chicago. Roberson is the recipient of the 2020 Jackson Poetry Prize, awarded annually by Poets & Writers to an American poet of exceptional talent.

Find details about every creative writing competition—including poetry contests, short story competitions, essay contests, awards for novels, grants for translators, and more—that we’ve published in the Grants & Awards section of Poets & Writers Magazine during the past year. We carefully revi...

Tomorrow 9:30 AM PST: Join our senior web editor Jessica Kashiwabara, Christina Chiu, Gerald Maa, and Jafreen Uddin for ...
05/08/2020
Poets & Writers

Tomorrow 9:30 AM PST: Join our senior web editor Jessica Kashiwabara, Christina Chiu, Gerald Maa, and Jafreen Uddin for a panel about Asian American literature and publishing. Register at the link below!

Time for our Friday jobs roundup: browse listings from Reedsy, Mass Poetry, Northwestern University Press, and others at...
05/08/2020

Time for our Friday jobs roundup: browse listings from Reedsy, Mass Poetry, Northwestern University Press, and others at pw.org/joblistings #JobsForWriters

#EventsCoordinator #FreelanceEditor #PressDirector

The Time Is Now! This week's writing prompts for poetry, fiction, and creative nonfiction feature indoor and outdoor act...
05/08/2020
The Time Is Now

The Time Is Now! This week's writing prompts for poetry, fiction, and creative nonfiction feature indoor and outdoor activities, a quibbling narrator, and beauty as an exception. And this week's Best Book recommendation is a nonfiction collection of essays, reviews, criticism, and reflections on literature, writers and writing, and twentieth-century culture. If you need more, browse through the complete archive of over 1,300 writing prompts and 400 of the best books on writing.

Weekly writing prompts in poetry, fiction, and creative nonfiction for poets and fiction writers.

“If Ottessa Moshfegh and Phoebe Waller-Bridge painted the town red together, this could be the fictive product of their ...
05/08/2020
GalleyCrush: Hysteria

“If Ottessa Moshfegh and Phoebe Waller-Bridge painted the town red together, this could be the fictive product of their evening out," writes Courtney Maum. This week's #GalleyCrush is Jessica Gross's Hysteria 👀, forthcoming from Unnamed Press on August 18:

Jessica Gross’s Hysteria, forthcoming from Unnamed Press on August 18, 2020.

Highlights from #DailyNews: Rick Barot is the recipient of the Poetry Society of America's 2020 Shelley Memorial Award; ...
05/08/2020
Rick Barot Wins Shelley Memorial Award, BookExpo and BookCon Announce Online Offerings, and More

Highlights from #DailyNews: Rick Barot is the recipient of the Poetry Society of America's 2020 Shelley Memorial Award; TC Tolbert reflects on new poems and the trauma of the pandemic at Poetry Foundation & Poetry Magazine; and Kiki Petrosino discusses silence, poetic form, and spirituality in a new Q&A at pw.org. Catch up on these stories and more news for writers:

Kiki Petrosino discusses silence, poetic form, and spirituality; the #SaveIndieBookstores campaign closes out with more than $1.2 million in donations; Ellen O’Connell Whittet considers the relationship between writing and dance; and other stories.

In our latest issue, Sara Nović spoke with several artists about their experience at the Deaf Artist Residency program (...
05/08/2020
Residency Supports Deaf Writers

In our latest issue, Sara Nović spoke with several artists about their experience at the Deaf Artist Residency program (DAR) at the Anderson Center in Minnesota. “The common language experience is something that so many people take for granted,” said poet Lilah Katcher. “Not so for us.”

The Anderson Center in Minnesota offers the nation’s only residency designed to give Deaf artists time to work alongside one another.

Clip of the Day: “What are these memoirs? What are these journals? They’re always a list of cool stuff.” In this Saturda...
05/08/2020
Aidy Bryant’s Childhood Journals

Clip of the Day: “What are these memoirs? What are these journals? They’re always a list of cool stuff.” In this Saturday Night Live video, actor and writer Aidy Bryant rediscovers journals from her childhood revealing her innermost thoughts and love for such things as turtles and Rosie O’Donnell.

Find details about every creative writing competition—including poetry contests, short story competitions, essay contests, awards for novels, grants for translators, and more—that we’ve published in the Grants & Awards section of Poets & Writers Magazine during the past year. We carefully revi...

We’re keeping a running index of community resources as we all grapple with how to proceed in our professional and perso...
05/07/2020
Resources for Writers in the Time of Coronavirus

We’re keeping a running index of community resources as we all grapple with how to proceed in our professional and personal lives under coronavirus:

A growing list of grants and emergency funds for writers as well as resources for booksellers, tools for working from home, and more.

"There’s a point at which the poem ends but the question still remains, and so, what do you do? You offer the poem up. Y...
05/07/2020
Between Worlds: A Q&A With Poet Kiki Petrosino

"There’s a point at which the poem ends but the question still remains, and so, what do you do? You offer the poem up. You offer the book up and you make an appeal to some kind of other worldly force that knows more than you do about the situation." Kiki Petrosino, whose latest collection, White Blood, is out this week from Sarabande, discusses archival silence, poetic form, spirituality, and more:

The author of White Blood: A Lyric of Virginia discusses definitions of poetry, ancestral silence, and unpacking American history’s “white blood.”

“I do most of my writing longhand, in lined notebooks. One unquestionable benefit to this approach is that you can take ...
05/07/2020
Christopher Beha

“I do most of my writing longhand, in lined notebooks. One unquestionable benefit to this approach is that you can take a notebook anywhere, leaving laptop and phone behind, and when you get there your only options will be to write or to stare at a wall.” —Christopher Beha, author of The Index of Self-Destructive Acts (Tin House Books, 2020), in this week’s #WritersRecommend

“I do most of my writing longhand, in lined notebooks. One unquestionable benefit to this approach is that you can take a notebook anywhere, leaving laptop and phone behind, and when you get there your only options will be to write or to stare at a wall. I usually enjoy writing once I’m underway...

For this week’s creative nonfiction prompt, write a personal essay that examines a moment or particular object that you ...
05/07/2020
On Beauty

For this week’s creative nonfiction prompt, write a personal essay that examines a moment or particular object that you found beautiful during a difficult time. What was this beauty in despite of? How did this beauty change your perspective on your situation? For more on this prompt, and other poetry and fiction prompts, visit The Time Is Now!

“However it is encountered, beauty is always an exception, always in despite of. This is why it moves us,” writes John Berger in “The White Bird,” his 1985 essay on aesthetics. Write a personal essay that examines a moment or particular object that you found beautiful during a difficult time...

Highlights from #DailyNews: Ed Roberson wins the 2020 Jackson Poetry Prize from Poets & Writers; PEN World Voices Festiv...
05/07/2020
Ed Roberson Wins Jackson Poetry Prize, PEN World Voices Festival Launches Online, and More

Highlights from #DailyNews: Ed Roberson wins the 2020 Jackson Poetry Prize from Poets & Writers; PEN World Voices Festival launches online; Tara Khandelwal and Michelle D’costa of Bound launch new literary podcast spotlighting Indian writers. Catch up on these stories and more news for writers:

Lambda Literary announces the winners of the Judith A. Markowitz Award; a new literary podcast celebrates Indian writers; Central Avenue Publishing plans coronavirus anthology; and other stories.

Congratulations to Ed Roberson, the recipient of the 2020 Jackson Poetry Prize! The prize is awarded annually by Poets &...
05/07/2020

Congratulations to Ed Roberson, the recipient of the 2020 Jackson Poetry Prize! The prize is awarded annually by Poets & Writers to an American poet of exceptional talent. Endowed by Susan and John Jackson, the prize carries a monetary award of $70,000 and aims to provide what poets need: time and encouragement to write.

The judges hailed Roberson as “a scholar and jazz-like innovator.” Read the full citation: at.pw.org/JP20

#poetry #poetryprize #edroberson #jacksonpoetryprize #jacksonprize #poetsandwriters

“I knew I would be given the freedom to create a female character that could say bold and blunt and nasty things, the pe...
05/07/2020
Literary MagNet: Souvankham Thammavongsa

“I knew I would be given the freedom to create a female character that could say bold and blunt and nasty things, the permission to cuss and be funny, be complicated,” says writer Souvankham Thammavongsa about the Toronto-based literary magazine The Puritan. Learn more about this publication, plus four others, at the link below:

The author on the journals that published stories from her collection How to Pronounce Knife.

Clip of the Day: For the Literary Hub’s Rekindled series, ZYZZYVA magazine editor Oscar Villalon interviews illustrator ...
05/07/2020
Rekindled: Oscar Villalon and Lisa Brown

Clip of the Day: For the Literary Hub’s Rekindled series, ZYZZYVA magazine editor Oscar Villalon interviews illustrator and cartoonist Lisa Brown about her book Long Story Short: 100 Classic Books in Three Panels (Algonquin Books, 2020), which distills well-known works of literature—including Atonement, Beloved, Madame Bovary, Twilight, and The Unbearable Lightness of Being—to three-panel comic strips.

Find details about every creative writing competition—including poetry contests, short story competitions, essay contests, awards for novels, grants for translators, and more—that we’ve published in the Grants & Awards section of Poets & Writers Magazine during the past year. We carefully revi...

Poets! The deadline for the Southern Humanities Review's Auburn Witness Poetry Prize is this Friday. Established in the ...
05/06/2020
Deadline Approaches for Auburn Witness Poetry Prize

Poets! The deadline for the Southern Humanities Review's Auburn Witness Poetry Prize is this Friday. Established in the memory of Jake Adam York, the prize includes $1,000, publication, and travel expenses to give a reading at Auburn University in October. Entry fee: $15.

The deadline is just around the corner for this year’s Auburn Witness Poetry Prize. Named for the late poet Jake Adam York and sponsored by Southern Humanities Review, the prize is given annually for a “poem of witness.” The winner of the prize will receive $1,000 and publication in Southern H...

"My daily ritual for the past forty days has been the same: coffee, Tolstoy, tweet. Repeat. This is the one hour in my d...
05/06/2020
Postcard From the Pandemic: Tolstoy Under Quarantine

"My daily ritual for the past forty days has been the same: coffee, Tolstoy, tweet. Repeat. This is the one hour in my day when I don’t worry." Wayne Scott has found relief from the stresses of the pandemic by participating in #TolstoyTogether, a virtual book club hosted by Yiyun Li and A Public Space.

Reading Tolstoy’s War and Peace as part of a virtual book club hosted by Yiyun Li and A Public Space has become a comforting ritual during the pandemic.

"When composing your cover letter...say something about what you perceive to be the conversation the editors are having,...
05/06/2020
Adam McGee of Boston Review

"When composing your cover letter...say something about what you perceive to be the conversation the editors are having, and how your work advances it," writes Adam McGee of Boston Review. Our latest Agents & Editors Recommend is up:

In response to the question, “What are you looking for?” every editor has at some point told an aspirant, “Surprise me!” We’re not trying to be dismissive—it’s just a harder question than people realize.

For this week’s fiction prompt, write a new version of an old story, or perhaps one you never finished, while imagining ...
05/06/2020
Narrative Truth

For this week’s fiction prompt, write a new version of an old story, or perhaps one you never finished, while imagining that the narrator has objections about how they are portrayed. Adjust the voice to be true to your narrator’s new needs. For more on this prompt, and other poetry and creative nonfiction prompts, visit The Time Is Now!

“You know who I imagine? The narrator. I imagine the narrator as an actual reader, reading what I’ve written and commenting to me about the voice and point of view,” writes Lorrie Moore in a New Yorker interview by Deborah Treisman, about the reader she imagines when writing. “You have to be...

Highlights from #DailyNews: Jacqueline Rose revisits Albert Camus's The Plague for the London Review of Books; Dwight Ga...
05/06/2020
Lessons From Albert Camus, Booksellers in California Prepare for Limited Reopening, and More

Highlights from #DailyNews: Jacqueline Rose revisits Albert Camus's The Plague for the London Review of Books; Dwight Garner considers breakfast foods in literature at The New York Times; and Publishers Weekly checks in with California booksellers as state social distancing protocols are due to change on Friday. Catch up on these stories and more news for writers:

Kristen Millares Young discusses the art of character development; Miranda Popkey describes her revision process; Jenny Odell on time and attention under coronavirus; and other stories.

“Above, at the station’s mouth, a preacherwove Spanish while beyond him on the ground a whiskered mansnored through the ...
05/06/2020
After Rubén by Francisco Aragón

“Above, at the station’s mouth, a preacher
wove Spanish while beyond him
on the ground a whiskered man
snored through the morning”

Follow the link below to listen to Francisco Aragón read from After Rubén, out yesterday from Red Hen Press! #PageOneAudio

Francisco Aragón reads from his poetry collection After Rubén, published in May 2020 by Red Hen Press.

Clip of the Day: “A washing line strung from our house to theirs, / those neighbourly neighbours, settlers / from a lost...
05/06/2020
Miniatures by Simon Armitage

Clip of the Day: “A washing line strung from our house to theirs, / those neighbourly neighbours, settlers / from a lost age and a childless planet.” From his attic, Simon Armitage reads his poem “Miniatures” from his latest collection, Magnetic Field: The Marsden Poems (Faber & Faber, 2020).

Find details about every creative writing competition—including poetry contests, short story competitions, essay contests, awards for novels, grants for translators, and more—that we’ve published in the Grants & Awards section of Poets & Writers Magazine during the past year. We carefully revi...

It's #GivingTuesdayNow, a day of global giving & unity created to respond to the coronavirus pandemic. We're determined ...
05/05/2020

It's #GivingTuesdayNow, a day of global giving & unity created to respond to the coronavirus pandemic. We're determined to continue supporting writers at this critical time.

Writers like Robert Savino depend on us for magazine content, free resources on pw.org, and opportunities to connect with others in the broader literary world. Become a Friend to support this work: http://at.pw.org/GivingTuesNow

#PW50Years #GivingTuesdayNow

For this week’s poetry prompt, write a pair of poems; one that focuses on an indoor activity, and one on an outdoor acti...
05/05/2020
Indoor/Outdoor

For this week’s poetry prompt, write a pair of poems; one that focuses on an indoor activity, and one on an outdoor activity. How has your notion of those designations been transformed since the pandemic? Are there new designations you’ve created? For more on this prompt, and other fiction and creative nonfiction prompts, visit The Time Is Now!

What comes to mind when you think of indoor activities versus outdoor activities? As the weeks of the coronavirus pandemic lockdown wear on, many have found it necessary to reconsider the traditional boundaries of these divisions. A recent New York Times article featured Michael Ortiz, a “financia...

"I scroll through Facebook and see certain friends doing amazing things and what I feel, often, is envy. I can admit to ...
05/05/2020
Postcard From the Pandemic: A Solid Little Feeling

"I scroll through Facebook and see certain friends doing amazing things and what I feel, often, is envy. I can admit to this. I can accept that sometimes, in weak moments, I’m a small enough person that seeing the excellent creative work my friends are doing during quarantine makes me feel a little envious, a little dull in comparison, a little blobby." Nathan Hill, the author of The Nix, struggles with the pressure to be productive during the pandemic and finds relief in celebrating the small victories:

The author of The Nix struggles with the pressure to be productive during the pandemic and finds relief in celebrating the small victories.

Highlights from #DailyNews: The New York Review of Books writers shares dispatches from around the world; the winners of...
05/05/2020
2020 Pulitzer Prizes, National Book Foundation Innovations in Reading Prize, and More

Highlights from #DailyNews: The New York Review of Books writers shares dispatches from around the world; the winners of this year's Pulitzer Prizes were announced yesterday; the National Book Foundation awarded its 2020 Innovations in Reading Prize to literacy nonprofit DIBS For Kids. Catch up on these stories and more news for writers:

Natalia Hero examines the long aftermath of sexual assault; Percival Everett’s latest novel is publishing in three different versions; Vogue reports on how the coronavirus is affecting the literary community; and other stories.

"Write what you do not know, which I think is particularly helpful because—not to sound too much like Socrates—I’m not r...
05/05/2020
Ten Questions for John Elizabeth Stintzi

"Write what you do not know, which I think is particularly helpful because—not to sound too much like Socrates—I’m not really convinced that anyone knows anything." Happy #pubday to John Elizabeth Stintzi, whose debut novel, Vanishing Monuments, is out now from Arsenal Pulp Press. Catch their answers to #TenQuestions below:

“Write what you do not know, which I think is particularly helpful because—not to sound too much like Socrates—I’m not really convinced that anyone knows anything.” —John Elizabeth Stintzi, author of Vanishing Monuments

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CO VET Written By: Orlon Braem and Co Vet PART ONE This composition is in two parts. Part One was written by me, Orlon Braem, and Part Two was submitted by Co Vet, a nineteen year old whom I’ve never met. It seems Co Vet had wished to visit our city recently, but was denied entrance herein by our mayor George Jennifer who apparently had done a background investigation concerning him. And my involvement in these matters began when the mayor turned his findings about Co Vet over to me, and asked me to write what’s turned out to be, I fear, a somewhat staid Part One of this disclosure. Thus, the following is what I’ve learned concerning Co Vet and his desire to come to our city. He turned nineteen recently. And apparently many people had laughed at him years ago, but aren’t laughing at him anymore. “I’ll change the world someday,” he used to boast, but few knew he’d affect that change before he left his teens. And at birth he’d been given a name his parents felt would symbolize his later accomplishments. There had been an established trend for males in his family, i.e. they’d all become military men. Hence, it was thought that his first name Co would align him with his familial predecessors, while the second moniker Vet would of course represent his state of being after his time in the military had ended. Yet, Co Vet had always had a mind of his own. And he felt his future lay in matters concerned with the health of mankind. Thus, one day he told his parents that he was leaving their military dream for him behind, and that he was going viral instead. Nevertheless, today Co Vet finds himself in anticipation of his next (twentieth) birthday, rather than in celebration of this his final year as a teen. But don’t get him wrong, he’s not proud of what he’s done thus far; still, he can’t overcome the symbolism and/or foreshadowing which exists within the fact that the world around him entered a decade of twenties without waiting for him to reach that same milestone. And, just a few days before his nineteenth birthday, he contacted our city’s mayor George Jennifer, and asked permission to celebrate his birthday in our city. “Why do you want to come here?” asked the mayor. “Well, I’ve been spreading myself pretty thin over the last few months, and one place I still haven’t visited is your city,” replied Co Vet. “Well, frankly, people like you aren’t welcome here,” replied Mayor Jennifer. “But I tell you what I’ll do for you. Send me, via whatever means you wish, some words of advice and/or knowledge, and if I find them to be worthy, I’ll have my friend Orlon Braem edit them, and send them off to his readership. But that’s all I can do for you.” “That’s fair enough,” replied Co Vet. “Expect my words in a few days.” And indeed Co Vet did send his words to our mayor who then turned them over to me for my perusal. And in fact Mayor Jennifer told me he hadn’t even read Co Vet’s words, although he’d told him he would. Instead, the mayor told me he wanted me to handle those words completely on my own. So, that’s what I’ve done. And in the next paragraph you’ll begin to read them, unedited except for two spelling mistakes. And as a personal aside, judging from his words, maybe Co Vet should pursue literature as his life’s calling rather than either medicine or the military. Part Two I think I can truthfully say, without being egotistical, that there are a lot of things that could and should be said about me. But perhaps the most important are these questions: First, how and why did my reign of terror upon mankind actually begin? And second, what will the world as a whole do if it discovers I was not accidentally loosed upon it? Nevertheless, whatever my truth may someday be found out to be, it’s my wish that if I ever do fade into a subdued existence, mankind will remember who it was that sent me out upon it. And I’m hoping that the next time anyone tells anyone else how grand it is to live left of center politically, they’ll remember an unfortunate Co Vet who never wanted to become a military warrior, but became, whether he wished to or not, a medical one instead. And here’s a secondary wish, which perhaps I don’t fully understand myself. I know the people of the states united are justifiably concerned about, and must take action against foreigners living illegally within their borders; but maybe, if it should be that my presence serves no other useful purpose, perhaps states people will now realize what it’s really like to work and toil on the farms, and in the factories and meat packing facilities in which their food is produced. But my journey in life thus far has actually been a sad and fairly lonely one. And I didn’t tell this to Mayor Jennifer when I asked to visit his city, but I had hoped to attend an Easter morning church service or mass there. Yet, I’ve been told by various elected officials that my presence in their midst is actually akin to them being visited by a plague upon their land! So, imagine that! I guess many feel I wasn’t sent to them from above, but from below instead! Still, regardless of their feelings about me, my thoughts often stray to what I consider to be the most basic matters concerned with life on planet Earth. And whether you’ll believe this or not, or whether you’ll wish to be told this or not, I believe that circumstances unsanitary, leftist politically, anti-religious, but hopefully not intentional, were what granted me a worldwide stage. Oh, and you know, sometimes the effects of what I’ve now infected myself with also overwhelm me. And they sometimes lead my thoughts off into areas of near insanity, as I fear you’ll now experience. Today, with a mind, body, spirit, and tragically also soul heavily burdened by all I’ve become, I’m striving for liberation. And I’m asking those of you who read this to recall the day the planners said they’d wait for us by the garden gate, where a huge stone began the stone terrace which should have extended off to the right, but didn’t. And remember also that as we left that day those self-serving manipulators told us they were certain we’d return someday from our journeys in beckoning meadows. And don’t forget that it was all so much quieter then, even though no freedom from problems could be found in any earthly realm - even then! And yes, I think it can be said that we were guided then by some sort of automatic pilot. And we paid both heartfelt and lip service to directional alterations. We believed in the Master, and existed within, but nonetheless investigated changes and time advancements. And it always seemed as though we were, as a poet once said, “Waiting for summer’s return, yet fearing it would appear enshrouded in wickedness.” And we knew that many believed wayfarers could never return home again. Still, we did come back. But those who said they’d wait at the gate were long gone then. And the large stone which began the terrace had been rolled away. And at that time a massive pestilence was terrorizing the land. Yet, there was still, for some reason, a Roman centurion guarding the area there. And as we approached him he said to us, “Your friend left here after being behind the stone for three days. But why he was brought here, or why he left from here, is unknown to me. Still, I know now I’ll always think about him whenever the Christian holiday of Easter approaches.” But then, sometime after that encounter, day and night time dreams began to visit our minds like the wild winds that blow outside of Eden. And those dreams often brought images to us of what some call reality. And one day, in what must have been the real world, a call was received by me from the communalists. And those champions of the communistic lifestyle then asked me “What about all the contradictions that exist in relation to the question of all that an individual might have done in his or her lifetime?” And I answered: “Because many mortals have never learned how to properly tread upon life’s straight and narrow path, numerous pitfalls and plagues have surfaced along that roadway. And it’s easy to offer questions, answers, and excuses in defense of oneself, and it’s also not difficult to blame either individuals or groups for all that’s amiss, yet, the bottom line remains: Did my life upon planet Earth help mankind and serve the eternal Master, or didn’t it?” And you know, I’ve often wondered if anyone could ever grab hold of a revolving wheel and spin it backward to its first revolution. We were born. We grew somewhat older. And then one day we were what society calls a man or woman. But we trusted others older than ourselves during those years. We had to. Our minds weren’t sufficiently developed yet then to know much more than the basic rights and wrongs. Still, usually we proceeded successfully, although from time to time there were problems. Sometimes some of the things we learned were corrupt. And other times certain of us were simply, for one reason or another, unable to graduate out of the human condition which features vast numbers of people as perpetual students of life’s highway. But I’ve always believed that every mortal can eventually find what I term “clarity of existence” if he or she wishes to. Sometimes though, some need the council and prodding of those who’ve already found it. Oh, and yes, I’d also personally like to help those who are in search of modern day clarity, but for some reason, most people try to avoid me. And in closing, I’d ask you who read this to not be fooled by political leftists who are now trying to use my presence to their advantage. Had they had the responsibility of handling me, they’d have done a far worse job. And if anyone should know that for certain, it’s me – right?
WHY I BELIEVE IN GOD:---MY MOTHER'S UNDYING LOVE -- By me (James M. Becher) As we celebrate on this great day The wonder that is Mom; Did you ever stop to ask yourself From whence her love has come? I've never seen the red sea part Or gathered manna from above, Nor watched a dead man's life re-start But, I've known the miracle of a mother's undying love. She gave me everything she had, And wished to give me more. She gave herself to meet my needs And never once got sore. She tried to teach to me the right And lead me in His way; And prayed for me with heartfelt tears The times I went astray. O' now I know my God is real. Christ lives within my heart. But it was my mother's faithful love Which gave this faith it's start. So tell me that there is no God. I'll ask you very plain: From what other source 'tis possible My mother's dear love came? Let every day be Mother's day And honor her with love; For surely she's a special gift Sent down from God above.