Memoiria Publishing NYC

Memoiria Publishing NYC At Memoiria Publishing NYC, we help clients write their life stories so they can be appreciated now and preserved for future generations.

Check out my Wavemakers column on local artist Geoff Rawling.
03/18/2019
Geoff Rawling, Local Artist | The Wave | Rockaway Beach, NY

Check out my Wavemakers column on local artist Geoff Rawling.

Geoff Rawling's Rockaway artwork is so prolific, there's a good chance you've taken it for granted. Beach 116th Street is a gallery of his work: the beach scene painted near the bus stop, the sign over Rockaway Beach Surf Shop, paintings at Pickles and Pies. And you've likely dined in the shadow of....

‪A full obit in one sentence, from #NYTimes coverage of #MarsRover. "It travelled more than the distance of a marathon...
02/15/2019

‪A full obit in one sentence, from #NYTimes coverage of #MarsRover. "It travelled more than the distance of a marathon when less than half a mile would have counted as success." If this were your story, would be your version of that sentence? ‬

Peggy Page was 45 years old when she discovered her love of theater. Today, she is inspiring the next generation of acto...
02/08/2019
Wavemakers | The Wave | Rockaway Beach, NY

Peggy Page was 45 years old when she discovered her love of theater. Today, she is inspiring the next generation of actors and singers through Rockaway Theatre Company's Young People's Theatre Workshop. I wrote about her journey for Wavemakers, my column in The Rockaway Wave.

(Editor's Note: We are so excited to bring the accomplished Cynthia Ramnarace to our pages as a featured columnist. Her column, aptly named "Wavemakers," will feature profiles of Rockaway folks who are doing their best to make our peninsula a better place. – MH) For three weekends straight, during...

Here's what I'd recommend as step one: Find the oldest living person in your family, and start asking questions. Even th...
02/04/2019
Why You Should Dig Up Your Family’s History — and How to Do It

Here's what I'd recommend as step one: Find the oldest living person in your family, and start asking questions. Even the most basic ones -- what is your full name? Where were you born? Who were your parents? -- can yield important details and sometimes, surprises.

Learning your history is forced reckoning, asking you to consider whose stories you carry with you and which ones you want to carry forward.

Dan's son gave him a memoir project for his 75th birthday. I worked with Dan to develop an outline for the book, select ...
01/24/2019

Dan's son gave him a memoir project for his 75th birthday. I worked with Dan to develop an outline for the book, select photos, and coached him through the writing process.After many rounds of rewriting, edits and extensive design work, Dan received his published memoir. His response made my day:

"it is beautiful and quality beyond my expectation. I and Barbara can’t tell you how happy we are with the result. We love the layout, the quality of cover and paper stock, everything.

"Cynthia, this has been a very rewarding experience for me and a legacy for my family."

It's a blessing when you're reminded of why you love your work. It's a blessing to do work that makes an impact.

Truth: I love reading obituaries. They are the perfect short story-- a chronicle of life's joy and sadness, and a glimps...
08/05/2018
CELESTINE ARNDT's Obituary on The Washington Post

Truth: I love reading obituaries. They are the perfect short story-- a chronicle of life's joy and sadness, and a glimpse into what defines success and how people overcome challenges. The best ones are full of rich detail and maybe even a little funny too. Check out this one and think-- how do you want to be remembered?

"She was not without flaws. Her sense of adventure was occasionally unencumbered by prudence or common sense. Her taste in sofa upholstery lapsed in the early 1970's. But she was also extraordinarily thoughtful, gracious, kind-hearted, and warm."

https://m.legacy.com/obituaries/washingtonpost/obituary.aspx?n=celestine-arndt&pid=189735330&preview=false&referrer=0

Read the Obituary and view the Guest Book, leave condolences or send flowers. | ARNDT Celestine Favrot Arndt 1940 - 2018 Celestine Favrot Arndt died at her home in Encino, California, on Saturday, July 21, 2018, surrounded by her beloved family. She was 77. Ms. Arndt was born

07/12/2018
BuzzFeed FYI

Recording our stories is so important, because we cannot forget what others have endured, and there is so much wisdom and inspiration in their ability to endure and overcome.

The power to live and forgive

12/12/2017
A Man for Others

During the summer of 2016, I had the honor of helping Andrew Israel write his memoir. The resulting book, A Man for Others, is a history of his life, as well as a love letter to his family. I am so grateful to the Israel family for allowing me to share this special time with them, and for the opportunity to publish this book. Teresa O'Brien Israel has asked that I make copies are available for purchase: http://www.blurb.com/bookstore/invited/7232632/6c118250fd74e739e9cd966684e861fb307ca7e4

In the weeks before he passed away, Andrew J. Israel shared his memories, his hopes and dreams for his children, and his immense love for his family in this memoir by Memoiria Publishing NYC.

12/09/2017

I'm very excited: I'm starting a new memoir project today! The client is 95, grew up in Prague, and was a refugee after the war. We have a lot of ground to cover, but I'm excited by the challenge.

Here is something I know for certain -- Everyone Has a Story! And everyone's story deserves to be told. That's why I fou...
10/24/2017
Write My Book | United States | Memoiria Publishing NYC

Here is something I know for certain -- Everyone Has a Story! And everyone's story deserves to be told. That's why I founded Memoiria: Everyone has a story, but writing them down doesn't come easy to everyone. Maybe you're too busy, or don't know where to start. Maybe you love to talk but really hate to write. Or you love to write, but need someone to help keep you on task. I'm here to help.
I spent the first half of my career as a journalist and writer, and have talked with hundreds of people about their greatest achievements, their saddest moments, and their most worthwhile accomplishments. Let me help you document your story, so it can be appreciated now and cherished for generations.
Learn more at www.memoiria.com, or email [email protected].

10/24/2017

I just sent Memoiria's latest book to the printer: "A Man for Others" by Andrew J. Israel. I can't wait to see the actual published book! Details to come on how you can order a copy.

I ran into one of my clients this weekend. He told me he sent his memoir to his mom to read, and she loved it so much sh...
10/16/2017

I ran into one of my clients this weekend. He told me he sent his memoir to his mom to read, and she loved it so much she won't return it. That story just bowled me over! I'm so honored to do this work.

In memoir, the dramatic points in a person's life often focus on victory over adversity. But equally important, as well ...
10/13/2017
I Have a Message for You

In memoir, the dramatic points in a person's life often focus on victory over adversity. But equally important, as well as inspiring and poignant, are the moments of pure serendipity, when the seemingly impossible just happens -- without warning, without explanation. And yet, they are pivotal. This is one of those stories. https://www.nytimes.com/video/opinion/100000005474329/i-have-a-message-for-you.html

To escape Auschwitz, she left her father to die. Decades later, she got a message from him.

I am so very excited to be going to press on my latest Memoiria memoir project. The book is for Andrew Israel, who passe...
09/17/2017

I am so very excited to be going to press on my latest Memoiria memoir project. The book is for Andrew Israel, who passed away last year at the age of 49. I worked with him while he was in hospice care. His book is part biography, part love letter to his family, and includes his hopes and dreams for his three children. I am so honored and blessed to be able to do this work.

WTRN #7 Your Newborn MomentMy son, Miles, turned 10 this week. Ten! He is my youngest, and I'm a bit surprised that it h...
06/05/2017

WTRN #7 Your Newborn Moment

My son, Miles, turned 10 this week. Ten! He is my youngest, and I'm a bit surprised that it has been that long since I had a newborn in my arms.

I clearly remember the day I gave birth to him -- an induced labor with no painkillers, which was pure insanity on my part and nothing I would every recommend to anyone. But I wanted to feel everything, and power my own body, even if it meant passing through the gates of hell to do it.

By the time I was ready to push, I was nearly delirious with pain and euphoria that this would soon be over. By the second push, he had crowned. I was a mad woman, ripping off my blood pressure cuff, delighting in blessed release that comes when you can finally start working against the pain. I pushed again, and halfway through the contraction my doctor told me: "Stop! Whatever you do, do not push."

The doctor did not tell me why. I breathed. I waited. When the next contraction came, without thinking I pushed. “No! stop!” yelled the doctor and nurse. The cord had been wrapped twice around Miles’ neck. I waited, the room quiet except for the beeping of machines and filling of my blood pressure cuff. "I felt my son leave my body, but he did not cry. I stopped breathing. The quiet felt like a new kind of pain. But then, it happened. My son cried, and it was beauty.

His warm, wriggly body was placed on my stomach. When his sister was born, my first child, this moment petrified me. Instead of being overwhelmed with love, I was just overwhelmed. A baby? Someone is giving ME a baby? Will I know what to do? Will I screw it up? She was so precious and fragile, and I was in shock.

But with Miles, it was different. I was experienced now, and that gave me the confidence to allow me to revel in pure, limitless joy. Here he was, finally. He was mine, and I had the gift of getting to know him and watch him become who he is meant to be.

This week, as he blew out his birthday candles, I felt that same joy wash over me. He has grown into a smart, thoughtful, funny and curious young man. He loves outer space and math and baseball. I watch him in wonder, curious as to where these interests will take him.

For #writethisrightnow, tell the story of the first time you met a beloved child in your life. What did you feel? What were your worries? Your hopes? What do you want to tell that child today?

#writethisrightnow No. 7
www.memoiria.com

Mother’s Day will soon be here, so for #writethisrightnow I challenge you to recall the parenting wisdom you’ve rece...
05/08/2017

Mother’s Day will soon be here, so for #writethisrightnow I challenge you to recall the parenting wisdom you’ve received from your own mother.

My mother is the master of the parenting one liners. Her words of wisdom are short and easy for a sleep-deprived brain to remember. But even more so, I think they’re memorable because they are true.

When my daughter, Mira, was born, I had never felt so ill-equipped or unprepared for a task. I was also a bit resentful. Mira was colicky, and the crying began reliably at 4 pm and continued until hours of rocking, singing and sometimes driving finally resulted in a sleeping baby. But the reprieve never lasted long. A couple of hours later, the floorboards again creaked from all of our middle-of-the-night pacing.

This was not what motherhood was supposed to look like, I thought. I was exhausted and out of patience. Where was all the cooing and gazing into each other’s eyes, those moments promised to me by diaper commercials and my friends who had babies that actually slept?

I had been a colicky newborn myself, and expected that my own mother would have the magical answer that would end those torturous, scream-filled nights. Instead, she said this:

“When you’re going through it, it feels like forever. But when you look back on it, it feels like the blink of an eye.”

It was not the answer I wanted. But 12 years later, I know she’s right—about colic, about the terrible 2s, and, hopefully, the trying teen years.

I complained to her when my daughter stopped sleeping through the night at the precise moment her newborn brother came home from the hospital; about how my son refused to eat anything but cottage cheese; about how hard it was to juggle work with a sick child.

Her response? Again, my mother offered no solutions. Instead, she helped me learn to trust myself.

“You’ll figure it out,” she said. And I did.

There are other gems:
“Take lots of pictures, because you won’t remember anything.” —
Truth

In response to the crying and the whining and the tantrums: “The problem is she doesn’t want to be a baby. She’ll grow out of it.”

I guess what my mother was telling me each time was – Learn to wait. Trust yourself. And enjoy the moment, because as hard as the baby years seem, once they are gone you’ll miss them.

Sometimes I do miss having a child I can hold in my arms and rock to sleep. But other times, I am so happy in the moment that I want to hit the pause button. I realize another one of my mother’s adages is quickly becoming true:

“As soon as they hit the teen years, it all goes by so fast.”

What are your mother’s words of wisdom? Write them down so you can pass them on. And if you have the opportunity, take a moment to say, “thanks, Mom.”

Speaking of which: “Thanks, Mom!” (This picture is of my mother and my daughter.)

#writethisrightnow No. 6

05/01/2017

Today is May Day, also known as International Workers’ Day. For #writethisrightnow, let’s talk about the working life. How did you get to where you are in your career? Here is my story.

I am a writer, and I write people’s life stories. I came to this work first through a love of writing itself—as a shy, chubby kid with glasses and braces, who was often teased and bullied, putting pencil to paper let me express myself in a way that was safe and satisfying. My fifth-grade teacher at P.S. 169 in Sunset Park, Brooklyn, Mr. Moss, gave us free writing time every day. We could pick any place in the gymnasium (our school so overcrowded, that’s where our classroom was) and write.

I always chose to sit on the windowsill of the huge, gated windows. I can still remember how absolutely happy this made me, how all the stress and frustration I felt melted away when I could be alone with my thoughts. Mr. Moss encouraged me to keep writing, to get better. A thought settled into my brain: This might be the thing that I am good at.

I kept writing, always excelling in English class. I kept reading, and by high school my obsession was newspapers. It was the 1980s, the years of Bernie Goetz, the subway vigilante, and the Central Park jogger, who was believed to be gang-raped by a gang of “wilding” teenagers. One day I decided to count how many female bylines I could find in the New York Daily News. I can’t remember how many I found, but I remember being appalled at how small it was.

This, I decided, was a discrepancy I could take on. I went to college and majored in journalism.

As a reporter, I’ve covered most of the major beats: politics, education, crime. But the reporting I loved most happened when I could sit at someone’s kitchen table and listen as they told me about a life-changing experience.

There are stories that stick with me: The couple that had two children die of a rare genetic disorder, and then had the courage to get pregnant again. A young woman who survived meningitis, but lost all four limbs in her battle with the disease. A mother of three small children whose husband died suddenly of a brain aneurysm, and the complete stranger who heard her story and decided to raise thousands of dollars to help her find a way forward.

Here I am, now, running a business that is focused on those kitchen-table conversations, where I get to help people record their greatest and most life-changing moments. A story written down is a story remembered, and I feel blessed to do the work I do.

For #writethisrightnow, tell the story of your career. What inspired you to take up the work you do? Did you have any obstacles in the journey to realizing your goals? Did you start out thinking you wanted one career, but wind up doing something completely different?

Feel free to share your story below!

If you would like to receive these writing prompts via email, please hit the "Send Message" button at the top of the page or email [email protected].

04/30/2017

The key, I think, is listening. If you talk with someone and are willing to accept their story, not internalize it or judge yourself by it, you can see a person's journey as a pure reflection of individual experience. That's what I try to capture.

Forget the flowers. And come on--Mom has enough nightgowns! How about give her a gift that will be a family heirloom to ...
04/28/2017

Forget the flowers. And come on--Mom has enough nightgowns! How about give her a gift that will be a family heirloom to be treasured for generations to come?

A customized, one-of-a-kind memoir from Memoiria Publishing NYC.

What you get:

-- A beautifully designed, hard-cover book based on my interviews with the mom in your life, and photographs of her choosing.
-- A gift certificate that includes information on getting started and details about the Memoiria process.
-- The envy of your siblings, who wish they had come up with such a great gift. Or...
-- The gratitude of your siblings, who appreciate your coming up with such a great gift idea that you can all give her together!

Packages are priced to your vision and budget. As part of this promotion, I will include an extra copy of the published book, so there is one for you, and one for mom.

Need more info? Visit www.memoiria.com or email me at [email protected].

Hurry! This offer ends May 6.

p.s. Yes, that picture is of me and my mom!

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