Visual Notes Radio Station Project & Worldwide Network

Visual Notes Radio Station Project & Worldwide Network THE NEW RADIO VISUAL NOTES BY FELIX FUNK MEDINA IS THE RESULT OF OVER 3 DECADES OF PHOTOGRAPHING ARTISTS & PERFORMERS OF ALL DISCIPLINES SPECIALLY MUSIC

RADIO MAN ,BACK ON THE AIR FELIX MEDINA STARTED , AROUND 1975 AT AGE 13 .GOING TO LIVE MUSIC CONCERTS AND HANGING OUT WITH THE MUSICIANS.MARKED FOR LIFE, DEVELOPING AN ADDICTION WHICH SIDE EFFECTS ARE AS WELL AS THE ADDICTION. IN 1980 I STARTED TO PRODUCE RADIO SHOWS ABOUT ROCK AND ROLL ,NEW AGE MUSIC,REGGAE,BLUES,JAZZ FUNK AND SIMILAR . IN ABOUT 1990 ONE DECADE LATER SWITCH TO AFROCARIBEAN RYTHMS ,SON CUBANO ,SALSA AND LATIN JAZZ.LAST INTERVIEWS IN 2006 TO CHOCOLATE ARMENTEROS AND SEPTETO HABANERO DE CUBA DURING TEATRO LIBRE JAZZ FESTIVAL IN BOGOTA COLOMBIA. IN LATE 90'S HE IS THE COLABORATOR OF AND COFOUNDER OF AN INTERNATIONAL JAZZ FESTIVAL IN COLOMBIA.IN 2000 MOVED OUT TO NEW YORK AND START THE EXTEND SUPPORT TO MUSICIANS THAT LIVE AND PERFORM IN THE CITY.ALL THESE YEARS ARE FULL OF PHOTOGRAPHS THAT WILL MAKE HISTORY ,PERHAPS ALREADY MAKING HISTORY.

Visual Notes Photo  by   Felix Funk Medina  February 11th  2018 Eliades Ochoa performs with Sammy Figueroa @ GroundUp Fe...
06/26/2020

Visual Notes Photo by Felix Funk Medina
February 11th 2018
Eliades Ochoa performs with Sammy Figueroa @ GroundUp Festival in Miami Beach .Eliades is part of Buenavista Social Club .

Eliades Ochoa Bustamante (born 22 June 1946) is a Cuban guitarist and singer from Loma de la Avispa, Songo La Maya in the east of the country near Santiago de Cuba.[1]

He began playing the guitar when he was six and in 1978 he was invited to join Cuarteto Patria, a group founded in 1939, as its leader. Although he looks like a guajiro, and he still wears his trademark cowboy hat, his roots are in the son, and he only agreed to take on the role of leader if he was allowed to introduce new elements to the repertoire. He plays the guitar, tres and also a variant of the guitar, with two additional strings. His involvement with the Buena Vista Social Club and the Wim Wenders film of the same name (1999), has led him to worldwide fame.

In 2010 he recorded an album with a number of Cuban and Malian musicians, including Toumani Diabaté, titled AfroCubism.[2]

Visual Notes Photo by @Felix Funk MedinaWith  Drummer Tony Allen in BAM Brooklyn New York.June 27th 2010 -Afrobeat Found...
06/26/2020

Visual Notes Photo by @Felix Funk Medina
With Drummer Tony Allen in BAM Brooklyn New York.
June 27th 2010 -Afrobeat Founder and Fela Kuty band member

Tony Allen, Drummer Who Created the Beat of Afrobeat, Dies at 79
With the Nigerian bandleader Fela and later on his own, he merged West African styles with American jazz and funk, reaching listeners worldwide.

The drummer Tony Allen in performance in Winterthur, Switzerland, in 2015. The composer and producer Brian Eno called Mr. Allen “perhaps the greatest drummer who ever lived.”
The drummer Tony Allen in performance in Winterthur, Switzerland, in 2015. The composer and producer Brian Eno called Mr. Allen “perhaps the greatest drummer who ever lived.”Credit...Ennio Leanza/EPA, via Shutterstock
Jon Pareles
By Jon Pareles
May 2, 2020

Tony Allen, the drummer who created the steadfast, subtle beat of the Nigerian protest funk known as Afrobeat, died on Thursday in Paris. He was 79.

His manager, Eric Trosset, said the cause was an abdominal aortic aneurysm.

From 1964 to 1978, Mr. Allen worked with the bandleader Fela Ransome-Kuti, who became known worldwide simply as Fela. He was the musical director for Fela’s band Africa 70, which forged music that was both politically committed and danceable, merging West African styles with American jazz and funk.

Mr. Allen made more than three dozen albums with Fela and the band, including the indelible “Zombie” and “Gentleman,” as well as solo albums on which Mr. Allen led Africa 70. The music of Fela and Africa 70 reached listeners and emulators all over the world. On Twitter, Peter Gabriel wrote, “As a musician & aspiring drummer, it was thrilling to get lost in their new, smart, sexy & political music full of killer grooves.”

The songs that defined Afrobeat, with Mr. Allen’s drumming at their core, move at a deliberate, unhurried tempo, geared for marathon six-hour sets and dancing until dawn. On albums, many of Fela’s 1970s Afrobeat songs stretched the length of an LP side.

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While Fela (who died in 1997) composed the parts for the band’s other instruments, Mr. Allen created his own drum parts. His playing was open-ended and improvisatory rather than bluntly repetitive; complex patterns drove a shifting dialogue with every element of the band. “You listen to it flowing like a river,” Mr. Allen explained in a 2016 interview with The Guardian.

After he left Africa 70 in 1979, Mr. Allen went on to an international solo career, leading his own bands and collaborating with rock, jazz, reggae, R&B and electronic musicians. The composer and producer Brian Eno, a fan since the 1970s, once called Mr. Allen “perhaps the greatest drummer who ever lived.”

Tony Oladipo Allen was born on Aug. 12, 1940, in Lagos, then the capital of Nigeria. He was the eldest of six children of James Alabi Allen, a Nigerian auto mechanic, and Prudencia Anna (Mettle) Allen, whose family was from Ghana.

As a teenager he learned electronics and worked as a radio technician — skills that would come in handy in his early days as a touring musician, when he repaired the band’s amplifiers. He didn’t start playing drums until he was 18.

He had grown up listening to West African music, but he also immersed himself in jazz, studying the drumming of Gene Krupa, Art Blakey, Max Roach, Elvin Jones, Philly Joe Jones, Tony Williams and others. “These guys were telling a story by playing different rhythms, and they were doing it with independent coordination,” he said in the 2013 book “Tony Allen: An Autobiography of the Master Drummer of Afrobeat,” which he wrote with Michael Veal. “That’s the way the drums should be played, man.”

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As he taught himself to play, Mr. Allen became particularly interested in the pedal-operated pair of cymbals known as the hi-hat, which he felt other African drummers neglected. The whoosh, rustle and ping of his hi-hats animated Mr. Allen’s drumming with an additional layer of polyrhythm.

“I’m creating different patterns with my four limbs,” Mr. Allen told The Guardian in 2014. “They are all playing something different, which means you need to split your mind into four elements with the one central idea running through.”

Martin Perna, the founder of the Brooklyn-based Afrobeat band Antibalas, which performed with Mr. Allen in the 2000s, said Mr. Allen “was the embodiment of rhythm.” He added, “What’s so magical is with all that variation, he’s somehow more hypnotic than a pattern that doesn’t change.”

Mr. Allen soon found work in Lagos highlife bands and groups that played whatever was popular. In 1964 he auditioned for Fela Ransome-Kuti, who was putting together a jazz band, beginning a 15-year musical alliance that survived chronic disputes over getting paid.

That first band’s pure jazz drew only small audiences, and Fela soon decided to combine jazz with African pop; as Fela Ransome-Kuti and His Koola Lobitos, the band played what it called “highlife jazz.”

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The group toured Nigeria and neighboring Ghana. In the late 1960s a Ghanaian promoter, Raymond Aziz, came up with a new name for their musical hybrid: Afrobeat.

During a lengthy stay in Los Angeles in 1969 when the band was on tour in the United States, Fela grew politicized by the Black Power movement. When the band returned to Nigeria, Fela renamed it first Nigeria 70 and then Africa 70. His new songs were more streamlined and merged James Brown-style funk with Mr. Allen’s rolling, crackling rhythms.

ImageMr. Allen in performance in Amsterdam in 1988. His music reached listeners worldwide.
Mr. Allen in performance in Amsterdam in 1988. His music reached listeners worldwide.Credit...Frans Schellekens/Redferns
“I had developed the drumming concept for Afrobeat from many things that I heard while I was growing up,” Mr. Allen said in his autobiography. “It was a fusion of beats and patterns. There was highlife, there was local Yoruba music like apala and sakara, there was jazz, and there was Western popular music like funk and R&B.”

Fela’s new songs also carried messages, at first couched in proverbs and then increasingly direct, that condemned corruption and taunted Nigeria’s military dictatorship. Although Fela and Africa 70 recorded extensively and performed regularly at his club, the Shrine, Fela was repeatedly arrested and beaten.

Africa 70 persisted, and Mr. Allen stayed on as bandleader until September 1978, when, after years of feeling musically fulfilled but financially exploited, he quit.

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Mr. Allen was backed by Africa 70 on his 1979 album, “No Accommodation for Lagos,” but he struggled to start his own band in Nigeria. Eventually, after recording in London, he settled in Paris in 1985.

In 1987 he married Sylvie Nicollet. She survives him, as do their three sons and four children from an earlier relationship in Nigeria, along with grandchildren and great-grandchildren. He lived in Courbevoie, a suburb of Paris.

Mr. Allen was frustrated with the first recordings he made in France, on which trendy-minded producers smothered his drumming with electronics. But in the 1990s he forged the blend of Afrobeat and dub electronics that he wanted on “Black Voices,” which featured guest appearances by singers from Parliament-Funkadelic. He found more compatible collaborators in the next decades.

A longtime fan, Damon Albarn of Blur and Gorillaz, appeared on Mr. Allen’s 2002 album, “Home Cooking,” starting a long affiliation. Mr. Allen joined Mr. Albarn in the band the Good, the Bad and the Queen and in a project with Flea, the Red Hot Chili Peppers’ bassist, called Rocket Juice & the Moon. He also made small-group jazz albums and recorded with the reggae guitarist Ernest Ranglin and the techno producer Jeff Mills. This year he completed “Rejoice,” an album featuring the South African trumpeter Hugh Masekela, who died in 2018, that was begun at sessions in 2010. On Saturday, Gorillaz released a new song with Mr. Allen and the grime rapper Skepta, “How Far?”

“I still challenge myself every time with my playing,” Mr. Allen wrote in his autobiography. “I still want to play something impossible, something that I never played before. That’s what I’m after.”

Jerry González (June 5, 1949 – October 1, 2018)[1] was an American bandleader, trumpeter and percussionist of Puerto Ric...
03/10/2019

Jerry González (June 5, 1949 – October 1, 2018)[1] was an American bandleader, trumpeter and percussionist of Puerto Rican descent. Together with his brother, bassist Andy González, he played an important role in the development of Latin jazz during the late 20th century. During the 1970s, both played alongside Eddie Palmieri and in Manny Oquendo's Conjunto Libre, and from 1980 to 2018 they directed The Fort Apache Band. From 2000 to 2018, Jerry González resided in Madrid, where he fronted Los Piratas del Flamenco and El Comando de la Clave. In October 2018, he died of a heart attack after a fire in his home in Madrid

Early life and career

The original members of The Fort Apache Band.
Jerry González was born in 1949 in Manhattan, on 158th Street and 3rd Avenue, and moved to the Edenwald Houses in the Eastchester section of the Bronx at the age of 4.[3] He was raised in a strong musical atmosphere, with the strains of Latin, Afro-Cuban and jazz music always in his ear, establishing his musical appreciation and molding his future work as an artist. His father, Jerry González, Sr., was a master of ceremonies and lead singer for bands during the Palladium era and sang with musicians like Claudio Ferrer. In junior high school he began playing trumpet and congas and jamming with local bands. After deciding this was his calling, González completed his formal studies at New York College of Music and New York University. He started his professional career playing with Lewellyn Mathews in the 1964 New York World's Fair. In 1970 he started playing congas with Dizzy Gillespie. With Gillespie's support and encouragement, González was able to fuse the African-based rhythms onto jazz elements without compromising the essence of either.

The next year, González joined Eddie Palmieri's band until 1974, when he moved on to work with Conjunto Libre, the band led by timbalero Manny Oquendo and Jerry's brother, bassist Andy González. He and his brother Andy were the founders of the Conjunto Anabacoa and later of the charismatic Grupo Folklórico y Experimental Nuevayorquino with whom he recorded two LP albums: Concepts of Unity (1974) and Lo Dice Todo (1975). The band members were Jerry and Andy González, Frankie Rodríguez, Milton Cardona, Gene Golden, Carlos Mestre, Nelson González, Manny Oquendo, Oscar Hernandez, José Rodríguez, Gonzalo Fernández, Alfredo "Chocolate" Armenteros, Willy García, Heny Álvarez, Virgilio Martí, Marcelino Guerra, Rubén Blades, Orlando "Puntilla" Rios and Julito Collazo.

He played with Tito Puente's ensemble (1984 to 1999), McCoy Tyner's band (1984 to 1990), and Jaco Pastorius's band (1984 to 1987)

The Fort Apache Band
In 1979, González published his first album as a leader: Ya yo me curé. Soon he formed his best-known group, The Fort Apache Band, which included his brother Andy and Kenny Kirkland, Sonny Fortune, Nicky Marrero, Milton Cardona, Papo Vázquez, Wilfredo Velez and the late Jorge Dalto. The ensembles' first two albums were recorded live at European jazz festivals, The River is Deep in 1982 in Berlin and Obatalá in 1988 in Zurich. These were followed by their hit album, Rumba Para Monk, in 1988, earning them recognition from the French Academie du Jazz with the Jazz Record of the Year award. This was the record that caught the ears of the jazz community, and is still considered a stellar project. After that, the 15 member band was compressed into a sextet: Larry Willis (piano), Andy González (bass), Steve Berrios (drums) and Carter Jefferson (saxophone) and Joe Ford (saxophone).

González and the band subsequently released Earthdance (Sunnyside,1990) and Moliendo Café (Sunnyside, 1991). These albums again demonstrated the band's ability to play Latin inspired jazz with genuine sensitivity and virtuosity. After Moliendo Café, Carter Jefferson died and was replaced by John Stubblefield. They then released Crossroads in 1994 and Pensativo in 1995, each of which earned them Grammy nominations. The ensemble was awarded The Beyond Group of the Year by both Down Beat Magazine reader's and critic's polls in 1995 and 1996.

González and group continued their creations on the 1996 album Fire Dance, recorded live at Blues Alley, and featuring interpretations of Thelonious Monk songs Let's Call This and Ugly Beauty, as well as original compositions. Their efforts were celebrated by winning a score of awards, including Best Jazz Group in Playboy Magazines Readers Poll for 1997. In 1998 they swept the Latin Jazz category at the New York Jazz Awards, winning both the Industry and Journalist Polls. In 1999 the group scored big with the critics and readers polls for Beyond Group of The Year in Down Beat Magazine.

Jerry González & the Fort Apache Band offered a tribute to Art Blakey and the Jazz Messengers on their 2005 release Rumba Buhaina. That was their first record as a quintet, without John Stubblefield, who died in 2005.

In 2008, the Heineken Festival paid tribute to Jerry González and his brother Andy, the first Puerto Ricans to be honored by the Heineken Festival. In October 2011, the Grammy awarded Arturo O'Farrill's Afro Latin Jazz Orchestra paid tribute to Jerry and Andy at the Symphony Space Theater.

His years in Spain
González's popularity rose after his contribution to the documentary film Calle 54, directed by the Oscar-awarded Fernando Trueba, where the main names of Latin jazz participated: Tito Puente, Paquito D’Rivera, Gato Barbieri, Chucho Valdés, Dave Valentin, and Israel "Cachao" López. This was not the only collaboration of González in films, as he participated in Crossover Dreams (León Ichaso, 1985) with Rubén Blades and Virgilio Martí, Piñero (León Ichaso, 2001), and episodes of Sesame Street. After the premiere of Calle 54 in 2000, González relocated to Madrid. The trumpeter went there for just one day during the tour with Calle 54 and ended up living there. He immersed himself in the flamenco scene and started to develop a new concept with the genre that would blossom in the future.

His hiatus in Madrid resulted in the production of Los Piratas del Flamenco (2004) a band and album that included the flamenco guitarist Niño Josele, the percussionist Israel Suárez "Piraña" and the singer Diego El Cigala. A novel approach is evident, as it was done without bass, without drums or piano, a radically new sound, a fusion of jazz and flamenco but with a twist. The album was nominated to the Grammy Awards as best Latin jazz album and won the Critics Award in New York as best Latin-jazz album of the year. He has also played with other flamenco musicians such as Enrique Morente, Paco de Lucía, Javier Limón and Jorge Pardo, copla musicians like Martirio and pop musicians living in Spain like the Argentinean Andrés Calamaro.

González's latest albums have been A primera vista (duet with Federico Lechner, 2002), Music for Big Band (Youkali/Universal, 2006) and Avísale a mi contrario que aquí estoy yo (Cigala Music, 2010), recorded with El Comando de la Clave, Jerry's quartet in Spain, which includes the Cubans Alain Pérez (bass), Javier Massó "Caramelo" (piano) and Kiki Ferrer (drums). It was nominated as best Jazz album to the Spanish Music Awards. The American edition of this album was called Jerry González y el Comando de la Clave (Sunnyside, 2011) was nominated to the Latin Grammy Awards as Best Latin Jazz Album and was voted Best Latin Jazz Album of the Year 2011 by jazz critics Ted Panken (Down Beat magazine) and Doug Ramsey.

In 2010, he was given the "Latino of the Year Award" in the 100 Latinos Awards-Madrid.

His next releases were an album with the Spanish contrabass player Javier Colina, a duet album with the flamenco guitarist Niño Josele and a Fort Apache album recorded live at the Blue Note in 2012 for the label Half Note Records.

Collaborations
In the long run of his career, González performed and recorded with musicians such as Jaco Pastorius, Tito Puente, McCoy Tyner, Dizzy Gillespie, Chet Baker, Eddie Palmieri, Cachao López, Woody Shaw, Tony Williams, Larry Young, Freddie Hubbard, Brooklyn Philharmonic, Archie Shepp, Paco de Lucía, George Benson, Chico O'Farrill, The Beach Boys, Papo Vázquez, Ray Barretto, Bobby Paunetto, Chocolate Armenteros, Hilton Ruíz, Chico Freeman, Don Moye, José "Chombo" Silva, Rashied Ali, Paquito D'Rivera, Kenny Vance, Diego El Cigala, Enrique Morente, Santi Debriano and Steve Turre.

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