Columbia Daily Spectator

Columbia Daily Spectator News, sports, and entertainment coverage for the Morningside Heights community in New York City since 1877.
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The Columbia Spectator, founded in 1877, delivers news and information daily to thousands of readers around Columbia, Morningside Heights, and West Harlem. We are the second-oldest college daily paper in the country and have been financially independent from the University since 1962. The newspaper is published five days a week during the academic year and our blog network, Spectrum, offers updates on news, arts, commentary, and photos from around campus and New York City. The organization is run by undergraduates from Barnard, Columbia College, General Studies, and SEAS, with a staff totaling over 200 students. Spectator has opportunities for a wide range of interests, including reporting, writing, editing, photography, design, multimedia, and finance. Along with the daily paper and blogs, Spectator Publishing Company Inc. includes The Eye, a weekly arts and features magazine; and the business division, which manages Spectator's financial standing. If you're interested in joining or have any general questions, please contact us at [email protected]. Follow us on Twitter @ColumbiaSpec

Operating as usual

After 116 years of performing at games and other events on campus, the Columbia University Marching Band voted to disban...
09/15/2020
Columbia University Marching Band votes to disband after 116 years

After 116 years of performing at games and other events on campus, the Columbia University Marching Band voted to disband on Sept. 12. This came just 10 days after the statement the band’s executive board gave denouncing the CUMB’s history of racism, sexual violence, and substance abuse.

Part 1 Part 2 (coming soon) Columbia University Marching Band votes to disband after 116 years By Lizzie Karpen September 15, 2020 After a history of disagreements with University administration and students, the Columbia University Marching Band voted to disband on Saturday night. Photography by Ka...

Start off the virtual semester by mastering the art of writing emails for virtual networking and getting your way into c...
09/14/2020
Essential tips for email etiquette: Tips and tricks to write your best email

Start off the virtual semester by mastering the art of writing emails for virtual networking and getting your way into classes.

If you’re a student, I challenge you to do an exercise. Go to your email inbox from two years ago. Pick one and read it. Are you cringing at the length, content, and word choice used in your email? Doesn’t it seem like a completely different person wrote that lengthy, verbose paragraph apologizi...

Shopping period can help you decide which classes are for you. To help you build the perfect schedule, make sure to chec...
09/14/2020
Courses we loved

Shopping period can help you decide which classes are for you. To help you build the perfect schedule, make sure to check out Spectrum’s top picks of courses we swear by.

Although the first week of classes is over, you may still be looking for a course that will make fall 2020 as engaging as possible. With the shopping period fully underway, Spectrum presents our top picks for courses at Columbia and Barnard. Ariana Novo University Writing: Readings in Gender and Sex...

Joining Opinion as a columnist, Discourse and Debate, or video contributor will allow you to engage with the Columbia co...
09/13/2020

Joining Opinion as a columnist, Discourse and Debate, or video contributor will allow you to engage with the Columbia community in a way that you would not be able to otherwise. As a contributor, you will have the chance to shape our student discourse and guide the opinions of your peers.

Access the Fall 2020 contributor application here: https://forms.gle/uxe8yfGqQcdYF9uk6

Due Date: Monday (September 14th)!

Worried about making friends through clubs this semester? Read about how esports is remaining active while off campus an...
09/11/2020
With the world powered off, esports becomes a way to reboot communities off-campus

Worried about making friends through clubs this semester? Read about how esports is remaining active while off campus and using its community for social good.
https://www.columbiaspectator.com/sports/2020/05/11/with-the-world-powered-off-esports-becomes-a-way-to-reboot-communities-off-campus/

Despite the club’s inability to meet in person, Columbia eSports has continued to build a community and make change online.

As the theater department and student theater groups develop virtual shows this semester, here's how they might look to ...
09/11/2020
Livestream senior thesis productions are theater at its most intimate and inventive

As the theater department and student theater groups develop virtual shows this semester, here's how they might look to last semester's livestream senior thesis productions for inspiration.

Sprawled across YouTube, Facebook, and Zoom, the theater department's senior thesis festival showcased interdisciplinary theater at its most inventive.

As visual arts students begin a remote semester, they might struggle to make the most of online resources. See how last ...
09/11/2020
Visual arts seniors merge digital and physical art in first-ever online thesis exhibition

As visual arts students begin a remote semester, they might struggle to make the most of online resources. See how last semester, visual arts senior thesis students confronted the same challenge, and the virtual exhibition they put up was a model of how to make and share art in a digital world.

The website’s home page resembles the start of a Zoom call so that viewers can click on each participating artist’s icon and explore their work on individual pages.

Select Columbia professors and students have participated in the national Scholar Strike to raise awareness on racial vi...
09/11/2020
Professors and students participate in Scholar Strike, calling for recognition of racial violence, police brutality

Select Columbia professors and students have participated in the national Scholar Strike to raise awareness on racial violence and police brutality. Many are looking for accountability among higher-level administration.

Select Columbia professors and students have participated in the national Scholar Strike to raise awareness on racial violence and police brutality. Many are looking for accountability among higher-level administration.

Joining Opinion as a columnist, Discourse and Debate, or video contributor will allow you to engage with the Columbia co...
09/11/2020

Joining Opinion as a columnist, Discourse and Debate, or video contributor will allow you to engage with the Columbia community in a way that you would not be able to otherwise. As a contributor, you will have the chance to shape our student discourse and guide the opinions of your peers.

Access the Fall 2020 contributor application here: https://forms.gle/uxe8yfGqQcdYF9uk6

Due Date: Monday (September 14th)!

Confused about the University's relationship with the Columbia University Marching Band? Read up on the last decade of s...
09/10/2020
A decade in athletics: Marching band bans, the rise of Pilling, and Columbia Athletics’ revolution

Confused about the University's relationship with the Columbia University Marching Band? Read up on the last decade of strife between the CUMB, Columbia Athletics, the University, and the student body.

During the 2010s, Columbia Athletics was able to clinch 33 Ivy League championships and 12 national team titles. Under two athletic directors—M. Dianne Murphy, who served between 2004 and 2015, and current Athletic Director Peter Pilling—Columbia Athletics began a transformation, developing nati...

Discourse: As the general election approaches, students discuss whether or not faculty should be free to voice their pol...
09/10/2020
Discourse & Debate: For professors and Columbia staff, how political is too political?

Discourse: As the general election approaches, students discuss whether or not faculty should be free to voice their political opinions.

Discourse could not truly exist without discord, and neither could we. Cynical as it may sound, people will always disagree with each other. Only in repressed societies do we find one-party regimes, with any and all dissent unnaturally quashed. However, we need not view discord as a necessary evil b...

Historically, student engagement in local government has fallen short of community members' hopes. However, the pandemic...
09/10/2020
Columbia’s commitment to create office space for CB9 may combat lack of student engagement

Historically, student engagement in local government has fallen short of community members' hopes. However, the pandemic has forced all gatherings to become virtual, making Community Board 9 meetings more accessible to students. The next general board meeting will occur on Sept. 17. Read our past coverage on how Columbia and CB9 have hoped to increase student engagement.

Community Board 9 has sat in a cramped office space for nine years. As part of an agreement set to acquire Manhattanville land, the University promised CB9 a new space to host general meetings. Students and CB9 members say this may increase student involvement.

Lew’s appointment as the only Black woman heading an endowment investment company in the Ivy League also comes at the he...
09/09/2020
Kim Y. Lew named Chief Executive Officer of Columbia Investment Management Company

Lew’s appointment as the only Black woman heading an endowment investment company in the Ivy League also comes at the heels of activism over where and how universities should invest their billions of dollars of wealth.

Lew, who was named Chief Investment Officer of the Year in 2019, served as the vice president and CIO of the Carnegie Corporation of New York, a philanthropic fund that supports education programs in the United States.

Columbia announced an updated gender-based misconduct and new interim Title IX policy in response to federal regulation ...
09/09/2020
Columbia’s updated Gender-Based Misconduct and Title IX policies, explained

Columbia announced an updated gender-based misconduct and new interim Title IX policy in response to federal regulation changes. Here’s what you need to know.

On Aug. 14, Columbia revised its sexual misconduct policies in response to a number of changes to Title IX federal regulations that drastically rolled back protections for students. Title IX of the Educational Amendments Act of 1972 is a federal law that prohibits sexual discrimination—including s...

Theater depends on real-time, in-person connections between the actors and audience. So what happens when theater moves ...
09/09/2020
Digital drama: Acting courses draw from film and radio after move to online learning

Theater depends on real-time, in-person connections between the actors and audience. So what happens when theater moves online? As classes' rehearsals for performing arts organizations restart, read how faculty and students in the theater department searched for answers last semester.

When Columbia announced students’ departure from campus amid the COVID-19 pandemic in early March, Samuel Powell, CC ’20, was working with his classmates to create a new adaptation of Euripides’ “Medea” for the acting course entitled Performing Greek Tragedy on the Modern Stage. Prior to t...

OP-ED: As some Columbia students rejoice in the resumption of classes, members of the Morningside Heights Community Coal...
09/09/2020
Columbia must consider the impact of its reopening plan on the surrounding neighborhood

OP-ED: As some Columbia students rejoice in the resumption of classes, members of the Morningside Heights Community Coalition voiced their apprehension.

As academic institutions in Morningside Heights plan to allow students back to campus during the COVID-19 pandemic, we are concerned about the effects on the health of local residents in the surrounding Morningside Heights and West Harlem neighborhoods. On July 7, University President Lee Bollinger....

Columbia recently hired a new CEO to manage its over $10 billion endowment, which has consistently underperformed in gen...
09/09/2020
Columbia wants the best and the brightest students. To keep up with top-ranked schools, it needs the richest, too.

Columbia recently hired a new CEO to manage its over $10 billion endowment, which has consistently underperformed in generating returns in comparison to its peers. As a result, the University must depend more heavily on revenue from its students—particularly those who can pay full tuition.

Columbia wants the best and the brightest students. To keep up with top-ranked schools, it needs the richest too. By Sofia Partida Data analysis and graphics by Jessica Li and Mike Fu Story edited by Valeria Escobar and Karen Xia May 24, 2020 As COVID-19 continues to spread, the unemployment rate si...

Professors, staff, students, and administrators in universities across the nation have organized a "scholar's strike" to...
09/09/2020
Students have been “just as good as the police” at enforcing the legacy of enslavement that would finance and expand Columbia’s prestige

Professors, staff, students, and administrators in universities across the nation have organized a "scholar's strike" to protest the deaths of and violence against Black people at the hands of police in America. Read our story below on how universities have leveraged relationships with the police to accumulate wealth and shut out Black communities.

Experts have long researched the ties between modern policing and the enslavement of Black Americans by white civilian landowners. Columbia and its students have played a part in this history.

Interested in joining Columbia’s performing arts community? Here’s everything you need to know about this fall’s virtual...
09/08/2020
The show must go on(line): Your guide to the virtual audition season

Interested in joining Columbia’s performing arts community? Here’s everything you need to know about this fall’s virtual audition season.

Find your fit in the high-powered Columbia performing arts scene, featuring a cappella, dance, and everything in between.

Joining Opinion as a columnist, Discourse and Debate, or video contributor will give you a platform that allows you to d...
09/08/2020

Joining Opinion as a columnist, Discourse and Debate, or video contributor will give you a platform that allows you to direct our student discourse toward the issues that impact our community the most. By voicing your opinion, you will help guide the opinions of our thousands of weekly readers.

Access the Fall 2020 contributor application here: https://forms.gle/uxe8yfGqQcdYF9uk6

Due Date: Monday, September 14th!

Calling all first-years: Have questions about class registration? Wondering how to navigate a virtual social scene? Read...
09/07/2020
Orientation 2020

Calling all first-years: Have questions about class registration? Wondering how to navigate a virtual social scene? Read our NSOP 2020 issue here for advice on all that you need to know your first year at Columbia!

Have unanswered questions still? Contact us at [email protected] to help us help our readers.

Columbia Daily Spectator's Guide to Orientation

JOIN SPEC: Since 1887, Spectator has told stories and conducted investigations that help students understand and shape t...
09/07/2020

JOIN SPEC: Since 1887, Spectator has told stories and conducted investigations that help students understand and shape their community. Where can you find love in a concrete jungle? How did our football team clinch its first back-to-back winning seasons for the first time in 56 years? How is Columbia’s expansion into Harlem impacting local residents? What happens when a tenured professor is accused of sexual assault? Find the answer to all these questions in our coverage.

If you’re interested in learning more about what we do, or in helping us shape the Columbia community, visit joinspec.com and fill out an interest form. We’ll be posting information about our Open Houses soon, as well as more information about what we do on a daily basis.

http://www.specpublishing.com/joinhttp://www.specpublishing.com/joinspec-applynow

Joining Opinion as a columnist, Discourse and Debate, or video contributor will allow you to engage with the Columbia co...
09/03/2020

Joining Opinion as a columnist, Discourse and Debate, or video contributor will allow you to engage with the Columbia community in a way that you would not be able to otherwise. As a contributor, you will have the chance to shape our student discourse and guide the opinions of your peers.

Access the Fall 2020 contributor application here: https://forms.gle/uxe8yfGqQcdYF9uk6

Due Date: September 14th!

Now that courses are fully remote, professors have had to adjust their courses and curricula to adapt to this transition...
09/01/2020
Here’s five professors’ advice on succeeding in your classes during a remote semester

Now that courses are fully remote, professors have had to adjust their courses and curricula to adapt to this transition. Get a look into the fall 2020 semester and what professors are planning.

Whether you’ve taken classes at Columbia before this semester or not, all students are apprehensive about a full semester of remote classes. Beyond the confusion that comes with  navigating office hours, courses that used to depend on in-person attendance—namely labs and senior seminars—may n...

Nervous about remote learning this semester? These Columbia and Barnard students shared their top tricks for how to surv...
09/01/2020
Advice for another remote semester: What we learned from the spring

Nervous about remote learning this semester? These Columbia and Barnard students shared their top tricks for how to survive Zoom University.

With classes remaining remote for the fall 2020 semester and with the majority of Columbia and Barnard students staying at home, first-years’ transition from high school to college might be even more difficult than under normal circumstances. Most University upperclassmen empathize with this situa...

Student group Mobilized African Diaspora has given Columbia 48 hours to respond to a list of demands that include the fu...
09/01/2020
Mobilized African Diaspora demands Columbia confront its anti-Black history, gives administrators 48 hours to respond

Student group Mobilized African Diaspora has given Columbia 48 hours to respond to a list of demands that include the full disclosure of Columbia’s relationship to the NYPD, a budget reduction for Public Safety, and the elimination of the “Term” date of the Community Benefits Agreement.

Mobilized African Diaspora has given Columbia 48 hours to respond to a list of demands that include the full disclosure of Columbia’s relationship to the NYPD, a budget reduction for Public Safety, and the elimination of the “term” date of the Community Benefits Agreement.

Joining Opinion as a columnist, Discourse and Debate, or video contributor will give you a platform that allows you to d...
08/31/2020

Joining Opinion as a columnist, Discourse and Debate, or video contributor will give you a platform that allows you to direct our student discourse toward the issues that impact our community the most. By voicing your opinion, you will help guide the opinions of our thousands of weekly readers.

Access the Fall 2020 contributor application here: https://forms.gle/uxe8yfGqQcdYF9uk6

Due Date: September 14th!

Testing out no-testing: Citing testing disruptions from the coronavirus pandemic, Columbia announced a test-optional pol...
08/29/2020
Columbia announced a test-optional policy for 2020-2021 applicants. Is it time to scrap the test requirement for good?

Testing out no-testing: Citing testing disruptions from the coronavirus pandemic, Columbia announced a test-optional policy for first-year undergraduate applicants for the upcoming application cycle. Columbia students and faculty, as well as admissions representatives from other top-ranked colleges, question the future of the testing requirement at Columbia.

When undergraduate applicants to Columbia and Barnard begin their Common Apps this fall, they will be given the option—for the first time in recent history—to decline to submit standardized test scores with their application. In late May, the University announced a test-optional policy for first...

From the classical designs of Columbia’s original buildings to the controversial expansion into industrial Manhattanvill...
08/21/2020
Columbia’s Architecture is Not an Urban Act

From the classical designs of Columbia’s original buildings to the controversial expansion into industrial Manhattanville, Columbia’s architecture has shaped its relations with the Harlem community. Spectator explores the implications of this architecture through archival research and professional interviews.

While walking through the streets of Manhattan, Harlem resident and Columbia College first-year Zenayah Roaché comments, “It’s like a whole different world. When you go up the blocks, you enter this world much where everything is separated, so now you continue to live in this ‘story.’” Si...

Following the announcement that undergraduates’ fall 2020 semester will be conducted entirely online, University adminis...
08/15/2020
Columbia has moved all undergraduate classes online. Here’s what you should know:

Following the announcement that undergraduates’ fall 2020 semester will be conducted entirely online, University administrators have sent flurries of emails to student inboxes while questions around financial aid, housing accommodations, and academics continue to arise. Read the important takeaways from Spectrum here.

Have other questions about what’s happening with the 2020-21 academic year? Know any unannounced details about the University’s plans? Help us keep readers in the loop at [email protected]

Barnard and Columbia announced a full move to online learning for all undergraduate classes and most graduate classes Friday afternoon.  Columbia’s decision follows a surge in COVID-19 cases in over 18 states and multiple territories. Though New York City entered Phase 4 of its COVID-19 reopening...

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The Columbia Spectator, founded in 1877, delivers news and information daily to thousands of readers around Columbia, Morningside Heights, and West Harlem. We are the second-oldest college daily paper in the country and have been financially independent from the University since 1962. The organization is run by undergraduates from Barnard, Columbia College, General Studies, and SEAS, with a staff totaling over 250 students. Spectator has opportunities for a wide range of interests, including reporting, writing, editing, photography, design, multimedia, marketing, sales, and finance. Along with daily content online and weekly paper, Spectator Publishing Company Inc. includes The Eye, an arts and features magazine, and the business division, which manages Spectator's financial standing. If you have any questions, please contact us at [email protected]. To submit an op-ed, contact [email protected]. Send news tips to [email protected].

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Call COVID-19 a Buckaroo!! By John Burl Smith Today is September 5, 2020; America is just short of 60 days, before making one of the most important decisions in recent times, maybe since Civil War. The tension and terror Donald Trump will force all Americans to endure, before his threatened nightmare of a Donald Trump dictatorship ends. The imagining would be hilarious and a comedy of errors had not his performance over the last 3 and a half years yielded such disastrous and deadly consequences for Americans. Now that the political conventions are history all that is left is to weigh Trump’s performance, as an incumbent president, and rate whether his “job” leaves him wanting. So, in that regard there is only one question on the ballot, “How did Trump do in the battle against the coronavirus pandemic?” COVID-19 is the only thing or issue that Donald Trump owns completely. It is the only event or set of circumstances that occurred, developed and continues unabated, reaping havoc on Americans, since it invaded America’s shores in January 2020. COVID-19’s invasion has shown Donald Trump to be a small, weak, hard put and desperate man. The nation has watched Trump frail and rail against it, as though words would drive such a ferocious and tenacious enemy from America’s shores. Donald Trump—the war president—greatest weapon against this grizzly monster—COVID-19—has been “lies.” Back in March, his “lies” began, “Fifteen people coming in from China, in a few days it will be down to zero,” or something to that effect. While the coronavirus was ravishing and devastating New York City, completely overrunning it and filling almost everywhere with bodies, Trump said, “It is going to disappear. One day it will magically go away!!!” With that prediction failing to miraculously transpire, Trump tried another “lip-de-flip, hoping to give the impression, he was storming ashore in Normandy on D-Day, in a ferrous charge, like Gen. Eisenhower. Trump took to the rose garden as though mounting a full frontal attack on COVID-19, but rolled out only a “dog and pony show.” Not fazed by Trump’s infantile rants, COVID-19 bomb rushed Trump’s podium, disguised as news reporters and forced Trump to retreat, offering only tweets to justify his long distance reporting, like a foreign correspondent at the frontline. Against coronavirus’ full invasion, America had no home guard to stop the most deadly enemy, at its shores, it has ever encountered, whether on its own soil or abroad. This is very hard for some Americans to admit, but everyone should remember, in his hatred and determination to destroy or wipe out anything that had to do with President Barak H. Obama. Donald Trump closed down the pandemic office established by Pres. Obama and VP Joe Biden. Trump, before the coronavirus invasion, held a barn fire on the White House lawn to burn the pandemic preparedness playbook Pres. Obama left for the next president. Trump followed up, further isolating and weakening the forward warning system Pres. Obama established for the US with international health organizations and groups studying that monitored possible future pandemic outbreaks. Trump put America on an island onto itself, with his isolationist ideas about health. Donald Trump left America vulnerable, and it is suffering from his blind hatred and disregard for not only former President Obama, but science and medical knowledge as well. With the 2020 election bearing down on his weak and fear filled retreat from the “rose garden,” Trump, in the face of COVID-19, waved a white flag. Only concerned with saving his reelection chances, much like his refusal to challenge Putin’s bounty on American soldiers, Trump capitulated before firing. a single shot. America’s “war president,” desperate to save his tanking economy, allowed COVID-19 to feast on Americans, like generous servings of Peking duck. Trump defied advice and warnings from scientists and doctors—that wearing masks, keep social distance, sheltering in place and remain closed down—which would slow the coronavirus spread, Trump cried and screamed helplessly and hopelessly to “reopened open the economy!!!” Fretting over sagging poll numbers, Trump’s “hail Mary” was a vaccine by the end of the year? Now we—Americans—are faced with a decision no Americans ever dreamed and our position now is much like Pres. Abraham Lincoln’s, preparing to give his Gettysburg Address, “Four score and seven years ago our fathers brought forth on this continent, a new nation, conceived in Liberty, and dedicated to the proposition that all men are created equal. Now we are engaged in a great civil war, testing whether that nation, or any nation, so conceived and so dedicated, can long endure.” Americans today are being called upon to reaffirm Pres. Lincoln’s charge from November 19, 1863. Although Trump is claiming the protests, burning, destruction and even deaths, during Black Lives Matter protests, are threatening America’s suburbs, but the resulting—4 deaths—does not compare to the 200,000 coronavirus victims, Trump refuses to even acknowledge. Prompted by desperation, Trump is trying and create conditions, as slave owners who refuse to end slavery, and declared war 157 years ago, on “today’s America.” But, like a new recruit on the line for the first time, Donald Trump’s weak kneed response is to declare and stoke fears of a second civil war, simply to avoid fighting COVID-19, the real enemy among us. There is no greater threat facing America than COVID-19 and the demand to defeat it. Along with the question regarding Trump fitness, as president, is the addendum for each voter, “Are you willing to accept the deaths of at least a million Americans, with Trump’s election and waiting for his prediction “COVID-19 will just go away, one day it will magically disappear” to prove true? Americans have another option, other than waiting for Trump’s “lies” to come true. For Americans who love their freedom, your vote for the one and only patriot standing between Donald Trump and the scenario I’ve presented is Joe Biden. Joe may not have been your choice starting out this election cycle, but he is what America has for a vindicator in this battle against the deadliest enemy America has ever faced. To wit, COVID-19 has made the Japanese bombing of Pearl Harbor, in terms of deaths (2,335) and economic dislocation, a blip on radar, while the coronavirus’ has continually dive bombed America, killing nearly 200,000 Americans, as “the war president” golfed it up every weekend. Trump’s total addiction of his duty to protect the American people has drawn only, “I take no responsibility,” so wait for a vaccine and take your chances. Trump’s response is why Joe Biden is currently working to pull together scientists, doctors, health professional, medical technicians, educational personnel, governors and mayor, as a Coronavirus Pandemic Taskforce (CPT) to develop a creditable, reliable and accurate assessment of the real state of affairs Americans face, regarding COVID-19. Some may charge Joe Biden is engaging in a political stunt, he is not president, and Trump might win. Biden is wasting his time. But, Mr. Biden’s point is, what if he wins; then he will walk into the White House on January 20, facing the total chaos Donald Trump leaves behind. It will take Mr. Biden 6 months to separate the “lies” from what scientists and doctors actually know today. That will continue Trump’s strategy of hoping the problem will go away, rather than preparing to meet it head on. Mr. Biden believes until America gets a handle on COVID-19, nothing else will fall in place. It is the coronavirus that has destroyed America’s economy, has over 50 million Americans out of work, and Trump has forced schools to reopen, when they are not ready and children and teachers are getting sick. Getting COVID-19 under control is something on which all Americans agree, and that is where Mr. Biden is starting. Peaceful protests in a few cities across this huge nation need to be addressed true enough, but peaceful protesters have not killed one American, while COVID-19 has killed nearly 200,000 Americans. On balance, which is the greatest threat for Americans? Trump wants you to choose fear and hate. Then there is Trump’s MEGA failure, not enacting the Defense Production Act (DPA). His failure, while saying, “I take no responsibility,” has been devastating to health care workers. They spent April and June struggling to get equipment and material needed to save lives, theirs and patients, even working at the risk of their lives. The DPA allows the federal government to develop testing kits and reeve up testing, so everyone who wants a test can get tested at government’s expense, while receiving results in a day. Frontline workers need PPEs, masks, face shields, gloves, respirator and ventilators; this equipment America should produce. Moreover, these are only a few items that were obtained from foreign nations because American companies do not make them. Mr. Biden says he will remember the work and sacrifices of frontline workers, during his administration, because without their dedication and expertise, America may not have gotten up off it COVID-19 death bed, in places like New York City. But to the point about the DPA, America must manufacture such vital equipment so it never gets caught unprepared to fight such an enemy ever again. The DPA gives the President the authority to nationalize the fight against such enemies. The President can mandate action and regulations needed to instruct citizens about proper behavior, which will support the entire citizenry, as well as command their cooperation, if need be, following federal government edits and guidelines. The DPA makes the President the last word and that responsibility is a heavy burden that the woman or man in the oval office must bear with humility and resolve. So I believe, Mr. Biden would say, the majority of Americans want him, as their new President, to concentrate on the enemy that is the greatest threat and on that, I believe all thinking Americans agree. The next issue is Donald Trump himself; he is upside-down in his thinking. First of all, Trump is the incumbent, which has the posh, classy, fancy and even spiffy, if you will, backdrop of the White House from which to campaign, similar to Richard Nixon—the first law and order president—who made the Rose Garden strategy so powerful. Yet and still, the nation witnessed the President of the United States in Kenosha, Wis. prowling around in the burned out hulk of a business, with a man who is no longer the owner, only to get a photo opp. That performance and Trump’s strategy is mystifying, but it is reminiscent of his stroll across Lafayette Park, after gasing peaceful protesters for his “upside down” bible photo opp. With the prospect of 300,000 American deaths by mid-2021, if not before, Trump has spent the last month stoking fears and calling for his rightwing militia to dominate the streets. He has repeatedly sent his far-right thugs to threaten communities trying to show his power or displeasure. Identical to Ann Arbor, Michigan when he used his thugs to support “reopen,” by threatening the Governor. Trump’s actions at that point, more than anything, was gasoline on COVID-19, his MAGA events have become “super spreaders,” which fueled the coronavirus resurgence into the full blown pandemic, it has become. Now, after being chased out of the White House by coronavirus, Trump is running around the country blaming Joe Biden for the mess he made, to support his change from being “the war president” to “I am the law and order president.” Hiding out on golf courses, Trump has become the first President to be cowed by an enemy, like COVID-19, then get run out of his own town. COVID-19 has revealed to America the yellow stripe that runs down Trump’s back, because the coronavirus has nailed Trump’s hide to the barn door and is using it for target practice. COVID-19 is riding rough shared cross America, like a buckaroo, with Donald Trump for it nag!!! I close on what Joe Biden conveyed to me when I asked “Why should I join your campaign?” “Because I’m fighting for you; your name is not on the ballot, so the only chance you have of getting anything, is that I beat Donald Trump. As fellow Americans, we are fighting a man that has failed so miserably at the job of President; I have undertaken this campaign to address that challenge, not because of a desire, deep in my heart, to be President. I would love to have continued enjoying life with Jill and my grandchildren, but with a mad man like Donald Trump in the White House and on the loose, with the power of government at his disposal, and we are seeing what that means now; some threats only a few see and that challenge must be answered by those whose eyes are open. Most assuredly, America is experiencing Trump’s fallout; his impact has been like a nuclear missile hitting America. Considering all that, then throw in, I’m looking at 80 years old, and in that mindset, no 80 year old man, in his right mind, or unless, he is still trapped in his twenty-something dream he could never let go, would volunteer to take on the madness I knew was waiting, if I took on the duty of at least trying to save America from the threat, I believed Donald Trump reflected, after 2018. Besides, everyone thought he was unbeatable!!! The 2018 elections showed that young progressive democrats had decided to fight Donald Trump over America, and I realized they would need real up from the other side and I believed in the end I could unite the party, after 2016. Here’s the thing, if someone didn’t stop Donald Trump, those who truly love America and have given their all, in military service, the diplomatic crop, front line workers, federal and state government employees and including everyday citizens, would no longer enjoy and feel free in this wonder land we celebrate and renew our commitment and vow to uphold the Constitution with our vote, would lose all of that. This is the reason my name is on the ballot for November 3rd to be President of the United State of American.”