Change Over Time

Change Over Time Change Over Time is a semiannual publication dedicated to fostering research and scholarly inquiry into conservation of the built environment.

Change Over Time is a new, semiannual journal publishing original, peer-reviewed research papers and review articles on the history, theory, and praxis of conservation and the built environment. Each issue is dedicated to a particular theme as a method to promote critical discourse on contemporary conservation issues from multiple perspectives both within the field and across disciplines. Themes w

Change Over Time is a new, semiannual journal publishing original, peer-reviewed research papers and review articles on the history, theory, and praxis of conservation and the built environment. Each issue is dedicated to a particular theme as a method to promote critical discourse on contemporary conservation issues from multiple perspectives both within the field and across disciplines. Themes w

The latest issue of Change Over Time: An International Journal of Conservation and the Built Environment published by th...
06/29/2021

The latest issue of Change Over Time: An International Journal of Conservation and the Built Environment published by the University of Pennsylvania Press is now available online and in print. Issue 9.2 Sounding Heritage features a collection of scholarly articles that consider ‘sound in heritage’ from a variety of disciplinary perspectives including, (but not limited to): acoustics, affective heritage, archaeology, architecture, conservation, design, disability studies, performance studies, psychology, tourism, and urban planning. Visit Project Muse at https://muse.jhu.edu/issue/44786 for online viewing OR visit Penn Press at https://cot.pennpress.org/home/ to order the issue in print.

The latest issue of Change Over Time: An International Journal of Conservation and the Built Environment published by the University of Pennsylvania Press is now available online and in print. Issue 9.2 Sounding Heritage features a collection of scholarly articles that consider ‘sound in heritage’ from a variety of disciplinary perspectives including, (but not limited to): acoustics, affective heritage, archaeology, architecture, conservation, design, disability studies, performance studies, psychology, tourism, and urban planning. Visit Project Muse at https://muse.jhu.edu/issue/44786 for online viewing OR visit Penn Press at https://cot.pennpress.org/home/ to order the issue in print.

05/01/2021

Celebrate 10 Years with The Woodlands on June 24! Become a sponsor of the 10th Annual Benefit and celebrate one of West Philadelphia’s most active, significant, and well-loved places! woodlandsphila.org/benefit2021

01/26/2021

Who wants one?

In 2008, the Historic American Buildings Survey (HABS) celebrated our 75th anniversary. During that year, Heritage Documentation Programs, NPS marked the occasion with an exhibition held at the U.S. Department of the Interior Museum in Washington, District of Columbia and the exhibition catalog AMERICAN PLACE.

DOWNLOAD your FREE copy of "AMERICAN PLACE: The Historic American Buildings Survey at Seventy-Five Years" which tells the important story of how the architectural history of America has been recorded for (over) seventy-five years by HABS from our website athttps://www.nps.gov/hdp/habs/AmericanPlace.pdf (22.3 MB .PDF).

#HABSnps #Preservation #PreservationThroughDocumentation
#ThisPlaceMatters #ThisPlaceMattered #HistoricPreservation #HeritageDocumentation #SavingPlaces #HistoricArchitecture #ArchitectureHistory

Timeline Photos
12/17/2020

Timeline Photos

Come work with us this summer!

Want to learn HABS documentation standards and methods? Would you like to operate a laser scanner and assemble a point cloud? How about learning photogrammetry, creating measured-drawings, and improving your CAD skills?

If you answered "YES!" then you need to apply for this summer job!

Heritage Documentation Programs, NPS in partnership with Environment for the Americas and the National Park Service Youth Programs, is thrilled to announce that the Historic American Buildings Survey (HABS) has been selected to host a Latino Heritage Internship Program (LHIP) architectural student next summer!

Applications are being accepted through February 7, 2021 for the 11-week paid internship to produce field measurements and measured drawings documentation of The Liberator Simón Bolívar Memorial (park and statue) in Washington, DC.

LEARN MORE
Visit https://latinoheritageintern.org/job/architectural-intern/ for eligibility requirements, project details, Covid-19 accommodations, and to apply online.

**Be sure to choose Heritage Documentation Programs, NPS as your first choice for the internship position.

#HABSnps #LHIP2021 #HistoricPreservation #SavingPlaces #PreservationThroughDocumentation
#FindYourPark #EncuentraTuParque #AmericanLatino #HispanicHeritage #SummerInternship #LHIP

"This manuscript... is a study of the commemoration of the village Oradour sur Glane that was destroyed by German forces...
10/16/2020
Oradour-sur-Glane: French Identity Memorialized| Mark Helbling – Change Over Time

"This manuscript... is a study of the commemoration of the village Oradour sur Glane that was destroyed by German forces in World War II. To this day, the ruins themselves remain evidence of the vicious attack that took place on October 8, 1944. Part of the story of the ruins includes the decision to use them for remembrance. The other part includes the considerations as to how to maintain them enough to stop them from completely disappearing over time." http://cotjournal.com/oradour-sur-glane-french-identity-memorialized-mark-helbling/

In her study, “The Thread That Binds Together: Lidice, Oradour, Putten, and the Memory of World War II,” Madelon de Keizer offers a comparative analysis of the violence that three villages (one Czech, one French, and one Dutch) suffered at the hands of German forces and the communities’ effort...

"This article examines relevant commemorative practices and memorial architecture in Bosnia and Herzegovina (B&H) as a f...
10/08/2020
Architecture and Collective Remembrance at the Tunnel D-B Memorial Site in Sarajevo | Sabina Tanović – Change Over Time

"This article examines relevant commemorative practices and memorial architecture in Bosnia and Herzegovina (B&H) as a framework for the analysis of Sarajevo’s Tunnel D-B (popularly known as the “Tunnel of Hope” and “Tunnel of Salvation”), an official memorial site that is currently being transformed through a number of architectural interventions." http://cotjournal.com/architecture-and-collective-remembrance-at-the-tunnel-d-b-memorial-site-in-sarajevo-sabina-tanovic/

Architecture has historically been used and explored as an aide-mémoire in various ways. Its role, however, in commemorating violent death is invariably complicated. In cases of human-on-human violence, commemoration is entangled with feelings of anger, resentment, and vengefulness. Official monume...

"This article examines how some churches, in their bombed and ruinous condition, came to be reused across England in the...
10/01/2020
Bombed Churches, War Memorials, and the Changing English Urban Landscape| Peter J. Larkham – Change Over Time

"This article examines how some churches, in their bombed and ruinous condition, came to be reused across England in the post–World War II period...[providing] a useful snapshot of architectural and urban conservation theory and practices." http://cotjournal.com/bombed-churches-war-memorials-and-the-changing-english-urban-landscapepeter-j-larkham/

War memorials are produced through acts of new creation and by the destructive effects of war. This article examines how some churches, in their bombed and ruinous condition, came to be reused across England in the post–World War II period. The ways these buildings were treated throughout the war ...

"The current European migrant crisis has illustrated historic preservation's limits in incorporating sites of transience...
09/24/2020
SITES OF REFUGE IN A HISTORICALLY LAYERED LANDSCAPE: CAMPS IN CENTRAL GREECE | KOSTIS KOURELIS – Change Over Time

"The current European migrant crisis has illustrated historic preservation's limits in incorporating sites of transience. During 2016, the Greek government managed its surge of migrants by erecting 50 dispersed camps throughout the mainland. Built out of tents, trailers, squats and other ephemeral architectures, refugee and migrant settlements leave a light footprint on the landscape and are easily erased. By design, camps perform impermanence to a double audience, to the natives who do not want their guests to settle permanently and to the migrants who wish to return home or advance to more stable accommodations." http://cotjournal.com/sites-of-refuge-in-a-historically-layered-landscape-camps-in-central-greece-kostis-kourelis/

The Asia Minor Catastrophe of 1922, as it is known in Greek history, led to the displacement of 1.2 million Greeks from Turkey to Greece. “Ever since the expulsion from Eden, man has been trekking, and folk wanderings are the roots of his history,” reads a 1925 article in National Geographic o...

Take a quick look at one of the articles in Change Over Time's recent issue 9.1 Heritage of War, Conflict, and Commemora...
09/14/2020
REORIENTING PEARL HARBOR MEMORIES: From Antagonists to Allies, Prime Minister Shinzo Abe’s Reorientation of the USS Arizona Memorial| YUJIN YAGUCHI – Change Over Time

Take a quick look at one of the articles in Change Over Time's recent issue 9.1 Heritage of War, Conflict, and Commemoration! Follow the Project Muse link at the end of the post to view the full article!

http://cotjournal.com/reorienting-pearl-harbor-memories-from-antagonists-to-allies-prime-minister-shinzo-abes-reorientation-of-the-uss-arizona-memorial/

In the closing days of 2016, Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe made a visit to Honolulu, Hawai’i, to meet with US President Barack Obama, who was vacationing in his childhood state. This would be the prime minister’s ninth and final meeting with President Obama, whose term was ending in less th...

05/29/2020

CALL FOR ABSTRACTS

The journal Change Over Time: An International Journal of Conservation and the Built Environment, published by the University of Pennsylvania Press, invites submissions for: 10.2 Integrity. Abstracts of 200-300 words are due 5 June 2020. Check our Website - cotjournal.com - for more details.

05/05/2020

FREE WEBINAR hosted by Peter Hilger and Clifton Fordham of the Construction History Society of America.

Quaranta Giorni and other Tales of Construction History

Brian Bowen
Quaranta Giorni

Betsy Frederick-Rothwell
The Underground Origins of Air Conditioning

Polly Root Sturgeon, Todd Thompson, Jennifer Lanman
Building a Nation: Indiana’s Dimension Stone Legacy

Friday, May 29, 2020 / noon - 1pm Central

Register Now at:
https://umn.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_qYhNeuw3Qc-oXDLdNwidww

CALL FOR ABSTRACTSThe journal Change Over Time: An International Journal of Conservation and the Built Environment, publ...
05/05/2020
The Criteria for Selection

CALL FOR ABSTRACTS

The journal Change Over Time: An International Journal of Conservation and the Built Environment, published by the University of Pennsylvania Press, invites submissions for:
10.2 Integrity | Guest Editor: Jukka Jokilehto

Check our Website - cotjournal.com

The concept of “integrity” is central to the organizing principles and values of heritage conservation and is frequently evoked in international charters, conventions, and official recommendations. Generally speaking, integrity refers to the wholeness or intactness of a tangible object, place, or property and is a measure by which UNESCO determines the Outstanding Universal Value of a site. As a guiding principle of conservation practice, the concept of integrity has evolved from 19th century ideas of the artist’s intent, which located integrity in a moment in time (Viollet le Duc), to 21st century framings of integrity as an emergent condition as proposed by the 2005 Faro Framework Convention which suggests that integrity is neither fixed nor static but is understood through a process of interpreting, respecting, and negotiating complex, and at times, contentious values.

The elaboration of integrity has developed in tandem with the expanding scope of heritage from individual monuments to more complex assemblages that defy singular synchronic definitions of form and significance. Heritage today includes urban, cultural, and vernacular landscapes that necessitate an understanding of the inextricable relationship between the built environment, cultural context, and intangible values and thus requires both a more nuanced and versatile assessment of integrity. While UNESCO and ICOMOS offer general guidance on assessing integrity, it is clear that integrity is a relational concept. As a result, despite its primacy of place within conservation discourse and practice, the precise definition of the term remains somewhat elusive.

This issue of Change Over Time examines the core concept of “integrity” amidst evolving understandings of heritage and heritage conservation practice. It raises questions such as: How should integrity be assessed and interpreted for complex assemblages subject to multiple competing forces, as seen in cases of forced-migration, development, conflict, and climate change? What is an operating definition of integrity for archaeological sites whose conditions have dramatically changed due to damage incurred by the violent conflicts of terrorism or war, like the ancient city of Palmyra in Syria? How does integrity apply to cultural landscapes, such as coastal settlements, that are vulnerable to rising tides and extreme weather events, which not only threaten to alter the physical landscape, but may also disrupt traditional practices reliant upon delicate ecosystems? And how can the concept of integrity be understood and applied to historic urban areas such as Cairo, Delhi, and Shanghai that are experiencing rapid growth and development and attendant demographic change?

We welcome contributions from a range of contexts that both challenge operational concepts of integrity and demonstrate practical, actual, and inclusive approaches. Submissions may include, but are not limited to, case studies, theoretical explorations, and evaluations of current practices or policy programs.

Abstracts of 200-300 words are due 5 June 2020. Authors will be notified of provisional paper acceptance by early July 2020. Final manuscript submissions will be due 3 January 2021.

Submission
Articles are generally restricted to 7,500 or fewer words (the approximate equivalent to thirty pages of double-spaced, twelve-point type) and may include up to ten images. See Author Guidelines for full details at cotjournal.com, or email Managing Editor, Kecia Fong at [email protected] for further information.

*UNESCO’s criteria for selection do not define integrity, though it is noted that “the protection, management, authenticity and integrity of properties are also important considerations.” UNESCO. “The Criteria for Selection,” https://whc.unesco.org/en/criteria/

*ICOMOS defines integrity as a measure of the overall coherence and the wholeness and intactness of the property and its attributes. “Glossary,” International Council on Monuments and Sites, https://www.icomos.org/…/icomos-and-the-world-heritage-conv….

*While ICOMOS and UNESCO stress the wholeness of a property, the Advisory Council on Historic Preservation (ACHP) states that integrity is “the ability of the property to convey significance through physical features and context.”
#Integrity #COT #HistoricPreservation

The Criteria for Selection To be included on the World Heritage List, sites must be of outstanding universal value and meet at least one out of ten selection criteria. These criteria are explained in the ...

03/09/2020

CALL FOR ABSTRACTS

The journal Change Over Time: An International Journal of Conservation and the Built Environment, published by the University of Pennsylvania Press, invites submissions for:
10.2 Integrity | Guest Editor: Jukka Jokilehto

Check our Website - cotjournal.com

The concept of “integrity” is central to the organizing principles and values of heritage conservation and is frequently evoked in international charters, conventions, and official recommendations. Generally speaking, integrity refers to the wholeness or intactness of a tangible object, place, or property and is a measure by which UNESCO determines the Outstanding Universal Value of a site. As a guiding principle of conservation practice, the concept of integrity has evolved from 19th century ideas of the artist’s intent, which located integrity in a moment in time (Viollet le Duc), to 21st century framings of integrity as an emergent condition as proposed by the 2005 Faro Framework Convention which suggests that integrity is neither fixed nor static but is understood through a process of interpreting, respecting, and negotiating complex, and at times, contentious values.

The elaboration of integrity has developed in tandem with the expanding scope of heritage from individual monuments to more complex assemblages that defy singular synchronic definitions of form and significance. Heritage today includes urban, cultural, and vernacular landscapes that necessitate an understanding of the inextricable relationship between the built environment, cultural context, and intangible values and thus requires both a more nuanced and versatile assessment of integrity. While UNESCO and ICOMOS offer general guidance on assessing integrity, it is clear that integrity is a relational concept. As a result, despite its primacy of place within conservation discourse and practice, the precise definition of the term remains somewhat elusive.

This issue of Change Over Time examines the core concept of “integrity” amidst evolving understandings of heritage and heritage conservation practice. It raises questions such as: How should integrity be assessed and interpreted for complex assemblages subject to multiple competing forces, as seen in cases of forced-migration, development, conflict, and climate change? What is an operating definition of integrity for archaeological sites whose conditions have dramatically changed due to damage incurred by the violent conflicts of terrorism or war, like the ancient city of Palmyra in Syria? How does integrity apply to cultural landscapes, such as coastal settlements, that are vulnerable to rising tides and extreme weather events, which not only threaten to alter the physical landscape, but may also disrupt traditional practices reliant upon delicate ecosystems? And how can the concept of integrity be understood and applied to historic urban areas such as Cairo, Delhi, and Shanghai that are experiencing rapid growth and development and attendant demographic change?

We welcome contributions from a range of contexts that both challenge operational concepts of integrity and demonstrate practical, actual, and inclusive approaches. Submissions may include, but are not limited to, case studies, theoretical explorations, and evaluations of current practices or policy programs.

Abstracts of 200-300 words are due 5 June 2020. Authors will be notified of provisional paper acceptance by early July 2020. Final manuscript submissions will be due 3 January 2021.

Submission
Articles are generally restricted to 7,500 or fewer words (the approximate equivalent to thirty pages of double-spaced, twelve-point type) and may include up to ten images. See Author Guidelines for full details at cotjournal.com, or email Managing Editor, Kecia Fong at [email protected] for further information.

*UNESCO’s criteria for selection do not define integrity, though it is noted that “the protection, management, authenticity and integrity of properties are also important considerations.” UNESCO. “The Criteria for Selection,” https://whc.unesco.org/en/criteria/

*ICOMOS defines integrity as a measure of the overall coherence and the wholeness and intactness of the property and its attributes. “Glossary,” International Council on Monuments and Sites, https://www.icomos.org/en/2016-11-10-13-53-13/icomos-and-the-world-heritage-convention-4#integrity.

*While ICOMOS and UNESCO stress the wholeness of a property, the Advisory Council on Historic Preservation (ACHP) states that integrity is “the ability of the property to convey significance through physical features and context.”
#Integrity #COT #HistoricPreservation

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Change Over Time is a semiannual journal publishing original, peer-reviewed research papers and review articles on the history, theory, and praxis of conservation and the built environment. Each issue is dedicated to a particular theme as a method to promote critical discourse on contemporary conservation issues from multiple perspectives both within the field and across disciplines. Themes will be examined at all scales, from the global and regional to the microscopic and material. Forthcoming issues will address topics such as LGBTQ heritage, war and heritage, sounding heritage and professionalism.

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