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Early American Studies

Early American Studies Early American Studies is a quarterly journal dedicated to publishing original research on the histories and cultures of North America in the Atlantic world before 1850.

Sponsored by The McNeil Center for Early American Studies at the University of Pennsylvania, Early American Studies is a triannual publication dedicated to publishing original research on a broad range of topics. Each issue is organized with the goal of fostering research and scholarly inquiry into the histories and cultures of North America in the Atlantic world before 1850. Special emphasis is focused on topics and issues centered in the mid-Atlantic region.

Eager to welcome 2020-2021 fellow Emily Gowan back for this week's Friday seminar! Emily will present "‛Reader, Be Assur...
03/07/2022
Friday Seminars | The McNeil Center for Early American Studies

Eager to welcome 2020-2021 fellow Emily Gowan back for this week's Friday seminar! Emily will present "‛Reader, Be Assured This Narrative is No Fiction’: Harriet Jacobs, Sentimental Fiction, and the U.S. Abridgment History of 'Pamela'" on Friday 3/11 at 3 p.m. ET

Contact [email protected] for paper access and Zoom info.

https://www.mceas.org/events/friday-seminars

The McNeil Center sponsors a seminar that meets on Friday afternoons at 3:00 pm approximately twice a month between September and May, with the paper for each session circulated in advance. Over two hundred people attend at least once a year, with an average attendance of 40 to 50 at meetings held a...

The Winter 2022 issue of Early American Studies is now available on Project Muse! Check out our new cover and introducto...
02/02/2022
Project MUSE - Early American Studies: An Interdisciplinary Journal

The Winter 2022 issue of Early American Studies is now available on Project Muse! Check out our new cover and introductory letter from co-editors Rose Beiler and Judy Ridner https://muse.jhu.edu/journal/322

Early American Studies is a quarterly publication sponsored by The McNeil Center for Early American Studies at the University of Pennsylvania. Early American Studies is dedicated to publishing original research on a broad range of topics. Each issue is organized with the goal of fostering research a...

01/30/2022

Call for Submissions - Forum on using historical games
Deadline January 31, 2022

Have you used Reacting to the Past or other historical games in the college classroom? Early American Studies invites submissions to the journal’s new website for a forum on historical gaming in the classroom. We expect to launch the site, EAS Miscellany, in January 2022.

The forum, to be moderated by Michael LaCombe of Adelphi University, will feature multiple perspectives of literary scholars, historians, and others teaching the early American past through games.

We are looking for individuals who have used early American games, particularly Reacting to the Past, in their classrooms and who:

● Can discuss the benefits or challenges of using games to teach early American studies;
● Can provide insight on the pedagogy of games;
● Can address how the games influence classroom dynamics and student learning outcomes; or
● Can discuss how the games fit into general education or first-year experience programs.

Please send submissions (no longer than 800 words) to [email protected] and copy [email protected] before January 31, 2022. Authors should expect to receive editorial feedback on their submissions.

01/27/2022

Call for Submissions - Forum on using historical games
Deadline January 31, 2022

Have you used Reacting to the Past or other historical games in the college classroom? Early American Studies invites submissions to the journal’s new website for a forum on historical gaming in the classroom. We expect to launch the site, EAS Miscellany, in January 2022.

The forum, to be moderated by Michael LaCombe of Adelphi University, will feature multiple perspectives of literary scholars, historians, and others teaching the early American past through games.

We are looking for individuals who have used early American games, particularly Reacting to the Past, in their classrooms and who:

● Can discuss the benefits or challenges of using games to teach early American studies;
● Can provide insight on the pedagogy of games;
● Can address how the games influence classroom dynamics and student learning outcomes; or
● Can discuss how the games fit into general education or first-year experience programs.

Please send submissions (no longer than 800 words) to [email protected] and copy [email protected] before January 31, 2022. Authors should expect to receive editorial feedback on their submissions.

01/24/2022

Call for Submissions - Forum on using historical games
Deadline January 31, 2022

Have you used Reacting to the Past or other historical games in the college classroom? Early American Studies invites submissions to the journal’s new website for a forum on historical gaming in the classroom. We expect to launch the site, EAS Miscellany, in January 2022.

The forum, to be moderated by Michael LaCombe of Adelphi University, will feature multiple perspectives of literary scholars, historians, and others teaching the early American past through games.

We are looking for individuals who have used early American games, particularly Reacting to the Past, in their classrooms and who:

● Can discuss the benefits or challenges of using games to teach early American studies;
● Can provide insight on the pedagogy of games;
● Can address how the games influence classroom dynamics and student learning outcomes; or
● Can discuss how the games fit into general education or first-year experience programs.

Please send submissions (no longer than 800 words) to [email protected] and copy [email protected] before January 31, 2022. Authors should expect to receive editorial feedback on their submissions.

01/21/2022

Call for Submissions - Forum on using historical games
Deadline January 31, 2022

Have you used Reacting to the Past or other historical games in the college classroom? Early American Studies invites submissions to the journal’s new website for a forum on historical gaming in the classroom. We expect to launch the site, EAS Miscellany, in January 2022.

The forum, to be moderated by Michael LaCombe of Adelphi University, will feature multiple perspectives of literary scholars, historians, and others teaching the early American past through games.

We are looking for individuals who have used early American games, particularly Reacting to the Past, in their classrooms and who:

● Can discuss the benefits or challenges of using games to teach early American studies;
● Can provide insight on the pedagogy of games;
● Can address how the games influence classroom dynamics and student learning outcomes; or
● Can discuss how the games fit into general education or first-year experience programs.

Please send submissions (no longer than 800 words) to [email protected] and copy [email protected] before January 31, 2022. Authors should expect to receive editorial feedback on their submissions.

01/18/2022

Call for Submissions - Forum on using historical games
Deadline January 31, 2022

Have you used Reacting to the Past or other historical games in the college classroom? Early American Studies invites submissions to the journal’s new website for a forum on historical gaming in the classroom. We expect to launch the site, EAS Miscellany, in January 2022.

The forum, to be moderated by Michael LaCombe of Adelphi University, will feature multiple perspectives of literary scholars, historians, and others teaching the early American past through games.

We are looking for individuals who have used early American games, particularly Reacting to the Past, in their classrooms and who:

● Can discuss the benefits or challenges of using games to teach early American studies;
● Can provide insight on the pedagogy of games;
● Can address how the games influence classroom dynamics and student learning outcomes; or
● Can discuss how the games fit into general education or first-year experience programs.

Please send submissions (no longer than 800 words) to [email protected] and copy [email protected] before January 31, 2022. Authors should expect to receive editorial feedback on their submissions.

01/15/2022

Call for Submissions - Forum on using historical games
Deadline January 31, 2022

Have you used Reacting to the Past or other historical games in the college classroom? Early American Studies invites submissions to the journal’s new website for a forum on historical gaming in the classroom. We expect to launch the site, EAS Miscellany, in January 2022.

The forum, to be moderated by Michael LaCombe of Adelphi University, will feature multiple perspectives of literary scholars, historians, and others teaching the early American past through games.

We are looking for individuals who have used early American games, particularly Reacting to the Past, in their classrooms and who:

● Can discuss the benefits or challenges of using games to teach early American studies;
● Can provide insight on the pedagogy of games;
● Can address how the games influence classroom dynamics and student learning outcomes; or
● Can discuss how the games fit into general education or first-year experience programs.

Please send submissions (no longer than 800 words) to [email protected] and copy [email protected] before January 31, 2022. Authors should expect to receive editorial feedback on their submissions.

01/11/2022

Call for Submissions - Forum on using historical games
Deadline January 31, 2022

Have you used Reacting to the Past or other historical games in the college classroom? Early American Studies invites submissions to the journal’s new website for a forum on historical gaming in the classroom. We expect to launch the site, EAS Miscellany, in January 2022.

The forum, to be moderated by Michael LaCombe of Adelphi University, will feature multiple perspectives of literary scholars, historians, and others teaching the early American past through games.

We are looking for individuals who have used early American games, particularly Reacting to the Past, in their classrooms and who:

● Can discuss the benefits or challenges of using games to teach early American studies;
● Can provide insight on the pedagogy of games;
● Can address how the games influence classroom dynamics and student learning outcomes; or
● Can discuss how the games fit into general education or first-year experience programs.

Please send submissions (no longer than 800 words) to [email protected] and copy [email protected] before January 31, 2022. Authors should expect to receive editorial feedback on their submissions.

01/08/2022

Call for Submissions - Forum on using historical games
Deadline January 31, 2022

Have you used Reacting to the Past or other historical games in the college classroom? Early American Studies invites submissions to the journal’s new website for a forum on historical gaming in the classroom. We expect to launch the site, EAS Miscellany, in January 2022.

The forum, to be moderated by Michael LaCombe of Adelphi University, will feature multiple perspectives of literary scholars, historians, and others teaching the early American past through games.

We are looking for individuals who have used early American games, particularly Reacting to the Past, in their classrooms and who:

● Can discuss the benefits or challenges of using games to teach early American studies;
● Can provide insight on the pedagogy of games;
● Can address how the games influence classroom dynamics and student learning outcomes; or
● Can discuss how the games fit into general education or first-year experience programs.

Please send submissions (no longer than 800 words) to [email protected] and copy [email protected] before January 31, 2022. Authors should expect to receive editorial feedback on their submissions.

Apply for the McNeil Center's 9-month Barra Sabbatical Postdoc! Deadline Dec. 6. More information at http://mceas.org/po...
11/23/2021
MCEAS: Postdoctoral Fellowships

Apply for the McNeil Center's 9-month Barra Sabbatical Postdoc! Deadline Dec. 6. More information at http://mceas.org/postdoctoralfellowships.shtml

The McNeil Center for Early American Studies expects to appoint postdoctoral fellows in two distinct categories for terms beginning in 2022. Each fellow will enjoy private office space in the Center’s building at the northeastern gateway to the University of Pennsylvania campus; library, computer,...

Apply for the McNeil Center's 9-month Barra Sabbatical Postdoc! Deadline Dec. 6. More information at http://mceas.org/po...
11/16/2021
MCEAS: Postdoctoral Fellowships

Apply for the McNeil Center's 9-month Barra Sabbatical Postdoc! Deadline Dec. 6. More information at http://mceas.org/postdoctoralfellowships.shtml

The McNeil Center for Early American Studies expects to appoint postdoctoral fellows in two distinct categories for terms beginning in 2022. Each fellow will enjoy private office space in the Center’s building at the northeastern gateway to the University of Pennsylvania campus; library, computer,...

Apply for the McNeil Center's 9-month Barra Sabbatical Postdoc! Deadline Dec. 6. More information at http://mceas.org/po...
11/16/2021
MCEAS: Postdoctoral Fellowships

Apply for the McNeil Center's 9-month Barra Sabbatical Postdoc! Deadline Dec. 6. More information at http://mceas.org/postdoctoralfellowships.shtml

The McNeil Center for Early American Studies expects to appoint postdoctoral fellows in two distinct categories for terms beginning in 2022. Each fellow will enjoy private office space in the Center’s building at the northeastern gateway to the University of Pennsylvania campus; library, computer,...

The Fall 2021 issue of Early American Studies is now available on Project MUSE! https://muse.jhu.edu/issue/46740
11/15/2021
Project MUSE - Early American Studies: An Interdisciplinary Journal-Volume 19, Number 4, Fall 2021

The Fall 2021 issue of Early American Studies is now available on Project MUSE! https://muse.jhu.edu/issue/46740

Early American Studies is a quarterly publication sponsored by The McNeil Center for Early American Studies at the University of Pennsylvania. Early American Studies is dedicated to publishing original research on a broad range of topics. Each issue is organized with the goal of fostering research a...

Apply for the McNeil Center's 9-month Barra Sabbatical Postdoc! Deadline Dec. 6. More information at http://mceas.org/po...
11/09/2021
MCEAS: Postdoctoral Fellowships

Apply for the McNeil Center's 9-month Barra Sabbatical Postdoc! Deadline Dec. 6. More information at http://mceas.org/postdoctoralfellowships.shtml

The McNeil Center for Early American Studies expects to appoint postdoctoral fellows in two distinct categories for terms beginning in 2022. Each fellow will enjoy private office space in the Center’s building at the northeastern gateway to the University of Pennsylvania campus; library, computer,...

Apply for the McNeil Center's 9-month Barra Sabbatical Postdoc! Deadline Dec. 6. More information at http://mceas.org/po...
11/02/2021
MCEAS: Postdoctoral Fellowships

Apply for the McNeil Center's 9-month Barra Sabbatical Postdoc! Deadline Dec. 6. More information at http://mceas.org/postdoctoralfellowships.shtml

The McNeil Center for Early American Studies expects to appoint postdoctoral fellows in two distinct categories for terms beginning in 2022. Each fellow will enjoy private office space in the Center’s building at the northeastern gateway to the University of Pennsylvania campus; library, computer,...

Apply for the McNeil Center's two-year Barra Postdoc! Deadline TODAY! More information at http://mceas.org/postdoctoralf...
11/01/2021
MCEAS: Postdoctoral Fellowships

Apply for the McNeil Center's two-year Barra Postdoc! Deadline TODAY! More information at http://mceas.org/postdoctoralfellowships.shtml

The McNeil Center for Early American Studies expects to appoint postdoctoral fellows in two distinct categories for terms beginning in 2022. Each fellow will enjoy private office space in the Center’s building at the northeastern gateway to the University of Pennsylvania campus; library, computer,...

CALL FOR UNDERGRADUATE DIGITAL POSTERS: Due TODAY!The Americas Online: A Digital State of the Field for Early American S...
10/29/2021
The Americas Online

CALL FOR UNDERGRADUATE DIGITAL POSTERS: Due TODAY!

The Americas Online: A Digital State of the Field for Early American Studies
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
Date: 11-13 November 2021

In recent years, scholars of early America have engaged with digital methodologies to create projects that have facilitated new forms of inquiry, practice, and pedagogy. To assess the current state of digital early American studies, The Americas Online aims to bring together students, scholars, and professionals representing a variety of disciplines to determine how recent efforts by digital humanists have reframed—or may yet reframe—our understanding of the early Americas (conceived to include North America, the Caribbean, and the Atlantic world up to 1850). As demonstrated by the COVID-19 pandemic, it is imperative that we think about the ways digital tools and methods can enhance teaching, learning, and research. And given the systemic inequity in our societies, we must be aware of the systematic racism that shapes digital academic work and use digital tools and methods to accomplish anti-racist and decolonial agendas. The 2.5-day virtual event will include a keynote speaker and panel presentations in addition to asynchronous posters.

We are currently seeking undergraduate contributors to submit digital posters related to the conference themes as part of an asynchronous undergraduate session. We are using “digital posters” as shorthand for a range of web-accessible media that we hope to aggregate on a conference site. We will entertain a range of file types, though you should choose web-accessible hosting (if hosting yourself) and format. Submissions might take various forms, ranging from a Google Slides presentation or poster file documenting projects or labor contributed, to completed digital projects created for classes, as independent projects, or as part of a faculty-or-staff-led project team. Posters should think critically and creatively about digital tools, methodologies, platforms, and projects. Undergraduates may submit as individuals or in groups, but you must be an undergraduate student at the time of the submission to qualify for prizes. A committee will award prizes to the top three submissions, with prizes to be shared among applicants; $250 for first place, $100 for second place, and $50 for third place.

To submit a poster for consideration, please send a 250-word abstract describing and contextualizing the digital poster, your submission, and a c.v./resume of no more than three pages to [email protected] with the subject line: “Digital Poster Submission - McNeil.” Submissions might include a link to a completed webpage that contains your project, a digital poster (in .pdf format) that outlines the major themes, video footage of the project (hosted on Youtube or Vimeo) that demonstrates interactive features. Format may be creative, but all submissions must tell the judges 1.) what the project is, 2.) what scholarly questions it aims to answer / what it teaches the audience about the early Americas / or how it assists with researching/teaching the early Americas, 3.) and how the project was made.

Posters should be submitted no later than October 29, 2021. They will be available on http://www.theearlyamericasonline.com as an asynchronous conference session. Awards will be announced at the end of the conference, on November 13.

This conference is sponsored by the McNeil Center for Early American Studies at the University of Pennsylvania, the Kislak Center at the University of Pennsylvania, the Wilson Institute for Canadian History at McMaster University, the Northeastern University Department of History, and the Institute for Thomas Paine Studies at Iona College.

The Americas Online: Thinking Digitally About Early America November 11-13, 2021Philadelphia, PA (virtually)The McNeil Center for Early American Studies In recent years, scholars of early America have engaged with digital methodologies to create projects that have facilitated new forms of inquiry, p...

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Sponsored by The McNeil Center for Early American Studies at the University of Pennsylvania, Early American Studies is a quarterly publication dedicated to publishing original research on a broad range of topics. Each issue is organized with the goal of fostering research and scholarly inquiry into the histories and cultures of North America in the Atlantic world before 1850. Special emphasis is focused on topics and issues centered in the mid-Atlantic region.

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A Letter to Humans (# 2050, 11-21-2020, T: 1:30 PM) Donkey-1: “Moulana Rumi” (1207-1273): Donkey had thorn in his hind kept scratching, hitting & kicking in agony Said; remedies they have prescribed are not for healing, but for demise! خر ز بهر دفع خار از سوز و درد جفته می انداخت صد جا زخم کرد گفت هر دارو که ایشان کرده اند آن عمارت نیست ویران کرده اند The ignorant leaders’ misjudgments in running our “Manmade Human World” are not unprecedented. “Moulana Rumi” who lived between 1207 & 1273, had wisely educated us through symbolizing a donkey that was hurting itself due to its ignorance. The donkey did not know how to get rid of the thorn in its hind. The message is as clear as day light. It perfectly points out that the ignorance is the core reason for leaders’ mismanagements. As per Fara-Hani’s “Worldology” leaders’ ignorance is due to their misunderstanding of our designed “Human World”. In addition, their misunderstandings have caused them to ignore the “Human Characteristics” development. Sadly, the development of our “Human Characteristics” has been subjugated for a long time. As a result our “Manmade Human World” is suffering. Leaders should apply the same disciplines in our “Manmade Human World” which have been specified in our designed “Human World”. Same disciplines apply to our designed ongoing “Human Project” development as well. Noncompliant random rules (Without disciplines) generate frictions between the developing fields of the scope of work of the designed ongoing “Human Project”. All other fields such as Medicine, Engineering, & etc. have been developing with passage of “Time”, except the ACME field of the “Human Characteristics”. Undeveloped “Human Characteristics” is the core reason for our problems. The existing & growing frictions between nations are as results of undeveloped “Human Characteristics”. Leaders can see the problems, but they are not braved enough to demand for solutions. In addition, leaders’ fears of changes, markets, competitors prevent them of going out of the “Plato’s Cave” to search for compliant solutions. As Mr. President Trump said; what will leaders lose if they do that? Double sadly, our “Manmade Human World” is still managed under Ju Ju Man & Medicine Man tactics. That means that the Nobel human values are still ignored. Triply sadly, in our “Manmade Human World”, the human connections have been ignored for a long time. However, The Fara-Hani’s “Worldology” continues to develop the “Human Characteristics”. We plead with leaders to observe the designed ongoing “Human Project” development. It is clear that, our designed ongoing “Human Project” is complicated, high technical & wonderful. Remember that people initially did not believe Galileo. People should update their outdated “Religious Ideologies”, human philosophies, & human doctrines. People should bravely amputate their “Fear” of “GOD” & believe that “GOD” loves everybody. Advisedly, leaders should bravely get out of the “Plato’s Cave”, open holes into the cave walls, & fight back with their own ignorance & join us to enlighten the “Manmade Human World”. Fara-Hani’s “Worldology” is a turning-point in our designed ongoing “Human Project”: in field of “Worldology”. Car GPS: 1973/1995 was a turning-point in our designed ongoing “Human Project” development in the field of “Transportation”, when the “GPS” was, discovered. https://youtu.be/UN9AOJdfDHA End of Donkey-1………………………………………………………………………….…………………….………………………………………..Continued.
A Letter To Humans (#2000, 10-9-2020, T:10:30 AM) Fara-Hani Resume-1: Here is a brief resume of my (Mike Farahani) life as of today. I was born in Tehran, Iran on August 23, 1947. Since my childhood, I had a notion something was missing in my life which I did not know. Things around me did not humanly make sense. For example, those kids, who claimed were from religious family, were not behaving the way expected. I had a feeling that our “Manmade Human World” did not have enough space for my thoughts. I was seeking for something unknown & I did not know what. I thought perhaps if I went to a new place, I would learn more about myself & find my unknown missing image. So I came to the USA. I did in fact find some answers here. I have realized that in my home country I was not treated like human. The basic human rights and freedom were missing among the people in my home country (though the Shah of Iran was propagating individual rights and freedom of choice). In the USA I actually started to learn more deeply about myself. I was still, however, haunted by the feeling that something was missing. Finally, in 2012, as I continued to concentrate on my profession as a professional civil engineer, I found the missing links of the puzzle. I never had imagined that I could find the missing links within my own profession. It has been proven that engineers normally approach to solve the problems with logical, mathematical and reason. I found practical, reasonable, & sensible answers to most of my questions & the missing puzzle pieces about “The Creation” that I had searched for. Now, I am showing my gratitude for everything that has been provided in my life including great parents, beautiful wife, educated daughters, wonderful grandchildren, & beautiful land of freedom seekers, the US. I am offering the unprecedented Image of My Thoughts ("IOMT") under Fra-Hani’s “Worldology” belief to my fellow classmates in the entire “Manmade Human World”. I believe we humans have been looking for logical answers barking up on the wrong trees. In addition of being confused, we have been causing a lot of needless sufferings to ourselves. This is an unprecedented belief about us as humans, through the wise-eyes of a professional civil engineer. Of course, this unprecedented belief will continue to be updated until our development from the human “infants” into objectified human beings is completed. It is very simple, easy, & practical to understand. There is no politics or business associated with this belief. This compliant belief will surely save & free us from the existing outdated beliefs. It will definitely bring us peace & harmony. It will put us on the full designed human living track. Please take your time, put all your outdated beliefs, temporarily, aside & free yourselves from their restraints & fears. And then reconsider your exceptional human values & think about this unprecedented belief. It took me 65 years of tolerance, patience, & pregnancy for "IOMT" (Image of My Thoughts) to be born. I believe that, sooner or later, everybody will observe the designed ongoing “Human Project” development, as “Galileo” had observed the Earth was sphere & not flat. “Saadi” (1210-1292): Man shall reach a level, where only The Lord can see Behold how exalted is the essence of Man رسد آدمی بجایی که جز خدا نبیند بنگر تا به چه حد است مقام آدمیت Fara-Hani’s “Worldology” is a turning-point in our designed ongoing “Human Project” development in field of “Worldology”. Rosa Parks: 1955 was a turning point in our designed ongoing “Human Project” development in the ACME field of the “Human Characteristics” when “Rosa” refused to sit in the back of the bus or refused to give her seat to a white person. End of Fara-Hani Resume-1………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….Continued
Perhaps some would enjoying visiting with one particular early American, Dr. Benjamin Franklin. https://www.facebook.com/PrintingOfficeMarketStreet/
"Pen & Ink Witchcraft: Treaties and Treaty Making in American Indian History" (2013) by Colin G. Calloway "In 1791, Ottawa war leader Egushawa remarked that he would rather fight an American army than be prisoner to their Indian treaties, which he derided as “pen and ink witch-craft, which they can make speak things we never intended, or had any idea of, even an hundred years hence.” Egushawa’s prophetic words reflect the basic premise of Colin G. Calloway’s new book, in which he argues that treaties were the “primary instruments” by which indigenous peoples were deprived of their lands, autonomy, and sovereignty, more so than by simple violence and warfare. In fact, Calloway crafts an entire narrative of Native American history from the eighteenth to twenty-first centuries predicated on the negotiation of Indian treaties between indigenous peoples and Euro-Americans. Through this narrative, he asserts treaties provide “a barometer of Indian-white relations in North America,” which demonstrates the “shifts in power, changing attitudes about the place of Indian peoples in American society, and contested ideas about indigenous rights in a modern constitutional democracy”. "While skeptics may cringe at the thought of orienting Native American history around treaty-making due to its potential connotations of the archaic “Indian-white relations,” Calloway presents several compelling reasons for why treaties offer a unique analytical lens into the interactions between Native peoples and Euro-Americans...." Read the rest of this review by Bryan C. Rindfleisch, now an assistant professor of history in the Marquette University Klingler College of Arts and Sciences whose work has been published in Early American Studies, Native South, The American Historian, Ethnohistory, and Journal of Early American History via the following link from Commonplace: The Journal of Early American Life: http://commonplace.online/article/indian-treaties-redux/