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The Jewish Quarterly Review

The Jewish Quarterly Review The Jewish Quarterly Review is a quarterly journal that has been publishing high-quality scholarship in Judaic studies for over a century. Established in 1889, The Jewish Quarterly Review is the oldest English-language journal in the field of Jewish studies.

JQR preserves the attention to textual detail so characteristic of the journal in the past, while attempting now to reach a wider and more diverse audience. In each quarterly issue of JQR the ancient stands alongside the modern, the historical alongside the literary, the textual alongside the contextual. JQR is published in association with the Herbert D. Katz Center for Advanced Judaic Studies at the University of Pennsylvania. @katzcenterupenn http://katz.sas.upenn.edu

Did you know? In each new issue we make one essay open access for 6 months.The latest is Allison Schachter's "Men Readin...
01/19/2022
Project MUSE - Men Reading Women: Gender, Secularism, and Literary Modernity in the Writings of Abraham Cahan and Sholem Aleichem

Did you know? In each new issue we make one essay open access for 6 months.

The latest is Allison Schachter's "Men Reading Women: Gender, Secularism, and Literary Modernity in the Writings of Abraham Cahan and Sholem Aleichem"

https://muse.jhu.edu/article/845339#.YegWUoWxlmU.twitter

This essay argues that women's active participation in modern Jewish culture shaped modern Jewish masculinity. I examine this phenomenon by looking at how women figured in the writings of Jewish men as symbols of a new cultural modernity, showing how male writers orient themselves in relationship to...

Check out the latest issue of JQR! Featuring a forum on Latin American Jewish Studies and articles by Amit Gvaryahu, Ron...
01/13/2022
New Issue of the Jewish Quarterly Review: Fall 2021

Check out the latest issue of JQR! Featuring a forum on Latin American Jewish Studies and articles by Amit Gvaryahu, Ron Lasri, Irven Resnick, Michal Ohana, and Allison Schachter.
Click through to the blog post with the contents in brief.

The TOC in Brief.

Our latest issue is now available, featuring Smail, Auslander, Balberg, Teplitsky, Danon, Bohak, Zawanowska, Bar-Asher, ...
09/29/2021
New Issue of the Jewish Quarterly Review: Summer 2021

Our latest issue is now available, featuring Smail, Auslander, Balberg, Teplitsky, Danon, Bohak, Zawanowska, Bar-Asher, Wilke, and Jobani!
Handily summarized for you in under 200 words, with links, including one free open-access essay.

The TOC in Brief.

New issue just out:Featuring: Ayelet Libson, Micha Perry, Ephraim Shoham-Steiner, Elisabeth Hollender, Zohar Segev, Vivi...
06/04/2021
New Issue of the Jewish Quarterly Review: Spring 2021

New issue just out:

Featuring: Ayelet Libson, Micha Perry, Ephraim Shoham-Steiner, Elisabeth Hollender, Zohar Segev, Vivian Liska, Eva Illouz, Adam Sutcliffe, Tuvia Singer, Søren Blak Hjortshøj, Jakob Egholm Feldt, Amos Morris-Reich, Galit Hasan-Rokem, Steven Nader, and Victor Tiribás!

On: Tosefta, Catalonian communal charters, Maimonides' responsa, Ashkenazi lay leadership, Auschwitz, Simmel's "The Stranger," and Menasseh ben Israel.

The TOC in Brief.

Check out the third and final part of our online forum on current affairs in the ultra-Orthodox world.This one focuses o...
04/26/2021
The Haredi Moment: An Online Forum, Part 3

Check out the third and final part of our online forum on current affairs in the ultra-Orthodox world.

This one focuses on the tension between conservatism and far-reaching changes in mission, self-perception, and gender identities.

Part 3 of our forum on recent developments in the ultra-Orthodox world features Orit Avishai, Itamar Ben-Ami, and Joshua Shanes on change and conservatism.

Part 2 of our forum on the Ultra-Orthodox moment is now up on the blog.This installment looks at the complex and ever-sh...
04/19/2021
The Haredi Moment: An Online Forum, Part 2

Part 2 of our forum on the Ultra-Orthodox moment is now up on the blog.

This installment looks at the complex and ever-shifting dynamics between the Haredi community and the state in Israel, as well as the need for a new mode of communications between them.

Part two of our forum on recent developments in the Ultra-Orthodox world features Netta Barak Corren and Lotem Perry-Hazan, Lea Taragin-Zeller, and Nechumi Yaffe and Shuki Friedman.

New:Read Ayala Fader, Samuel Heilman, and Shaul Magid on Haredi culture today, in the first part of our three-part onlin...
04/13/2021
The Haredi Moment: An Online Forum, Part 1

New:

Read Ayala Fader, Samuel Heilman, and Shaul Magid on Haredi culture today, in the first part of our three-part online forum edited by David Myers

The Jewish Quarterly Review convened a forum on recent developments in Ultra-Orthodoxy. This first installment features posts by Ayala Fader, Samuel Heilman, and Shaul Magid.

Announcing our latest issue!Click through for super-short summaries of essays by Elzbieta Kossewska, Yehonatan Wormser, ...
03/31/2021
New Issue of the Jewish Quarterly Review: Winter 2021

Announcing our latest issue!

Click through for super-short summaries of essays by Elzbieta Kossewska, Yehonatan Wormser, Reuven Kiperwasser, Shlomo Sela, Miriam Goldstein, Avi-RamTzoreff, and Magdalena Ruta

The TOC in Brief

ICYMI:JQR co-editor Natalie Dohrmann spoke with Irene Zwiep, Elisheva Baumgarten, and Jessica Marglin about scholarly he...
03/17/2021
The Past is Present in Jewish Studies Scholarship

ICYMI:

JQR co-editor Natalie Dohrmann spoke with Irene Zwiep, Elisheva Baumgarten, and Jessica Marglin about scholarly heritage and disruption.

Members of the JQR editorial board muse on the ongoing relevance of our scholarly past.

Anna Elena Torres explored the dramatic and beautiful work of Peretz Markish, Jewish anarchist poet in JQR 110.3
01/05/2021
Borderless Space, Radical Belonging

Anna Elena Torres explored the dramatic and beautiful work of Peretz Markish, Jewish anarchist poet in JQR 110.3

The modernist poet Peretz Markish expressed his anarchism in a Jewish idiom, writes Anna Elena Torres.

Now on YouTube: a short panel discussion with JQR editor Natalie Dohrmann and editorial board members about the past and...
12/22/2020
The Jewish Quarterly Review at 130

Now on YouTube: a short panel discussion with JQR editor Natalie Dohrmann and editorial board members about the past and future of the journal and the field

December 14, 2020 | ZoomNatalie B. Dohrmann in conversation with Irene E. Zwiep, Elisheva Baumgarten, and Jessica Marglin

The latest on the blog
12/18/2020
Secundus the Silent and the Vanishing Seduction of Beruriah

The latest on the blog

After the great Rabbi Meir asks his student to seduce his wife to teach her humility, the Talmud’s only named female Torah scholar commits su***de. Moshe Simon-Shoshan reassesses the legacy of this sordid tale.

Attending Association for Jewish Studies #ajs2020?JQR will be at the University of Pennsylvania Press exhibitor session ...
12/11/2020
Association for Jewish Studies - Exhibitor

Attending Association for Jewish Studies #ajs2020?

JQR will be at the University of Pennsylvania Press exhibitor session 12/14 @ 3:30 pm!

Editor Natalie Dohrmann will talk with JQR editorial board members Irene Zwiep, Jessica Marglin, and Elisheva Baumgarten about archives, venerating and disrupting the past, and shaking up the academic status quo.

More info for registered attendees: https://ajs2020.secure-platform.com/a/gallery/rounds/2/details/23

Founded in 1890, the University of Pennsylvania Press is one of the oldest scholarly imprints in North America. Penn Press publishes rigorous and thought-provoking work in the humanities and social sciences designed to advance knowledge, dialogue, and understanding.

The latest issue of JQR is out! This completes JQR's 110th year in print.(Well actually, 110th in America, 130th all tol...
12/10/2020
New Issue of the Jewish Quarterly Review: Fall 2020

The latest issue of JQR is out!

This completes JQR's 110th year in print.

(Well actually, 110th in America, 130th all told, or maybe 131st or 132nd depending on how you count. It's complicated. We're old.)

The TOC in Brief.

In the current issue: normalcy--or escapism--in the midst of the awful
09/24/2020
Vacationing in N**i Germany

In the current issue: normalcy--or escapism--in the midst of the awful

Even as the N**i state closed in on Jewish existence, many bourgeois Jews continued to lead bourgeois lives, leaving scrapbooks and diaries recording vacations and family gatherings. Ashkenazi and Miron read these images and words, so apparently anodyne, and yet impossibly so.

Kabbalistic Forms: Erratum et Novellus
09/15/2020
Kabbalistic Forms: Erratum et Novellus

Kabbalistic Forms: Erratum et Novellus

Yossi Chajes heralds the recent study of rarely depicted huppahs in kabbalistic manuscripts by Uriel Safrai and Eliezer Baumgarten.

Eve Krakowski finds traces of women’s folk piety behind Maimonides' ruling on ritual immersion
09/14/2020
Women’s Riches: Culture & Capital in Medieval Egypt

Eve Krakowski finds traces of women’s folk piety behind Maimonides' ruling on ritual immersion

Reform is always a destruction of something that exists to make way for the new. Eve Krakowski urges us to listen closely to the softer, almost-lost voices that emerge in times of social change.

Our latest blog post highlights the journal's long engagement with whatever Josephus meant by "Galileans"
07/08/2020
Josephus’s Elusive Command

Our latest blog post highlights the journal's long engagement with whatever Josephus meant by "Galileans"

Nathan Thiel tries to solve a puzzle that has long troubled the journal: Who were Josephus’s “Galileans”?

Katz Center for Advanced Judaic Studies
07/07/2020

Katz Center for Advanced Judaic Studies

Happening in less than one hour: a talk by David Ruderman on the subject of his new book, *Missionaries, Converts, and Rabbis: The Evangelical Alexander McCaul and Jewish-Christian Debate in the Nineteenth Century*.

Register NOW at https://zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_IQWYUI4LQe-RJKnEsM5AAg

The Holocaust and the BLM movement share the problem of knowing another’s experience. JQR editor David Myers convened Ju...
06/25/2020
Knowing the Victim? Reflections on Empathy, Analogy, and Voice from the Shoah to the Present

The Holocaust and the BLM movement share the problem of knowing another’s experience.
JQR editor David Myers convened Judith Butler, Cheryl Greenberg, Marianne Hirsch, and Robin D. G. Kelley to tackle the core epistemological and moral question of whether we can know another’s experience, and what is at stake in our answer.

The Holocaust and the BLM movement share the problem of knowing another’s experience. Judith Butler, Cheryl Greenberg, Marianne Hirsch, and Robin D. G. Kelley tackle the core epistemological and moral question of whether we can know another’s experience, and what is at stake in our answer.

Now on the JQR Blog, a forum on Jewish literature in light of pandemic
05/26/2020
Pandemic and Plague: Literary Encounters

Now on the JQR Blog, a forum on Jewish literature in light of pandemic

In this JQR Blog forum, the third in a series inspired by the COVID-19 pandemic, five scholars reflect on scenes from Jewish literature that allow them some purchase on this moment.

More content from the winter issue, free to all on Project MUSE
05/14/2020
Words and images

More content from the winter issue, free to all on Project MUSE

Yossi Chajes finds new aspects of Lurianic kabbalistic practice in the relationship between text and image.

JQR Contributor Conversation: Hadar Feldman Samet on Sabbatian Hymns
03/09/2020
JQR Contributor Conversation: Hadar Feldman Samet on Sabbatian Hymns

JQR Contributor Conversation: Hadar Feldman Samet on Sabbatian Hymns

Hadar Feldman Samet’s essay Ottoman Songs in Sabbatian Manuscripts: A Cross-Cultural Perspective on the Inner Writings of the “Ma’aminim” (JQR 109.4) explores a little-known set of liturgical songs produced and used by members of the religious group devoted to Shabbetai Tsvi, a seventeenth-c...

Now free to view and download without a subscriptionA Thousand-Year-Old Biblical Manuscript Rediscovered in Cairo: The F...
02/11/2020

Now free to view and download without a subscription

A Thousand-Year-Old Biblical Manuscript Rediscovered in Cairo: The Future of the Egyptian Jewish Past

https://muse.jhu.edu/article/747292

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The newest issue of The Jewish Quarterly Review is now available, and it features an essay by 2021–22 Katz Center fellow Micha J. Perry (אוניברסיטת חיפה - University of Haifa). Check out the table of contents in brief 👇
Check out the essay "The Political Theology of the Feminine Jew and Anticolonial Criticism in the Writings of Yehoshua Radler-Feldman (R. Binyamin) during WWI" by Avi-Ram Tzoreff at the latest JQR showing how Rabi Binyamin "integrated into his writings elements of the pacifist-feminist philosophy of his time, as well as theological views of the Jewish feminine and anticolonial criticism."
It's Women's History Month! Read about Nina Davis Salaman, a regular contributor to the old series of The Jewish Quarterly Review. Davis's first piece was published in 1894, when she was just 17 years old! Learn more about this fascinating scholar in a post authored by JQR coeditor Natalie Dohrmann. #TBT
#OTD in 1847, Solomon Schechter was born. Among numerous accomplishments, Schechter served as editor of The Jewish Quarterly Review (JQR) with Cyrus Adler. JQR is the oldest English-language journal in the field of Jewish studies, is now housed at the Katz Center, and is published by the University of Pennsylvania Press.
It's an editor's favorite day of the year: Punctuation Day! To celebrate, read about how to write (and read!) peer evaluations, a blog post series by Natalie Dohrmann, coeditor of The Jewish Quarterly Review:
What did Josephus mean by the term οἱ Γαλιλαῖοι? Find out in Nathan Thiel's recently published essay in The Jewish Quarterly Review (110.2).