Clicky

Gerrit Vyn Photography

Gerrit Vyn Photography Gerrit Vyn is a conservation photographer and cinematographer based in Portland, Oregon. Find me at www.gerritvynphoto.com and on Instagram @gerritvyn

Operating as usual

To see the making of this photo of a Western Screech-Owl check out my latest Field Vlog: Link in bio 👆...#westernscreech...
03/20/2022

To see the making of this photo of a Western Screech-Owl check out my latest Field Vlog: Link in bio 👆
.
.
.
#westernscreechowl #screechowl #owls #owlsofinstagram #owllover #owlsoftheday #ethicalowlphoto #roosting #camouflage #cryptic #fieldnotes #vlog #photovlog #phototips

Another new field Vlog if you like that sort of thing. In this short one I photograph a Western Screech-Owl at its day r...
03/19/2022

Another new field Vlog if you like that sort of thing. In this short one I photograph a Western Screech-Owl at its day roost. Link in bio and please subscribe!!
.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1DTTZJLCm6I&t=56s
.
.
#westernscreechowl #screechowl #fieldvlog #photovlog #tragopanlinds @tragopanblinds #birdphotography #birdphotographer #phototips #vlog #vlogger #pnwphotographer #pdx

03/03/2022

World Wildlife Day! At Tragopan, we believe in putting wildlife and their welfare first. It is one of the main reasons we started this business: to promote the practice of using photography blinds to lessen our cumulative and individual impacts on wildlife and habitat. We also know it creates unique opportunities for photos.

.

✔️Using blinds benefits wildlife in several obvious way

🦃 It eliminates the foot pursuit that can cause wildlife to flush, flee, or change their behavior.

🦌 It spreads photographers out, reducing impacts on habitat and popular locations.

✔️Using blinds also benefits photographers

🦜 It gets us closer to wildlife, more often, and without impact.

🦥 It opens up opportunities closer to home where animals may be less approachable.

🦒 It increases chances to photograph natural, undisturbed behavior.

🦏 It allows us to create unique images in new places, instead of creating the same images at the same places everyone else goes.

02/26/2022

New Field Vlog! Great Gray Owls! Nikon Z9!
.

https://youtu.be/9kSr0XGOcfk

.
#greatgrayowl #greatgreyowl #ethicalowlphoto #vlog #nikonz9 #fieldcraft #birdphotography #birdphotographer #photovlog #pnwphotographer #nanpapix #audubon

First shots with the new Nikon Z9 a Great Gray Owl in the snow earlier this week. Stay tuned for the Vlog!...#ethicalowl...
02/25/2022

First shots with the new Nikon Z9 a Great Gray Owl in the snow earlier this week. Stay tuned for the Vlog!
.
.
.
#ethicalowlphoto #greatgrayowl #greatgreyowl #owlsofinstagram #owl #nikonz9 #birdsofinstagram #birdphotography #bird_brilliance #bird_perfection #bird_freaks #pnwonderland #pnw #pnwphotographer #pnwlife #tragopanblinds

Imposing and bizarre, the Greater Adjutant stork was once widespread across India and South-East Asia. Today, after year...
01/11/2022

Imposing and bizarre, the Greater Adjutant stork was once widespread across India and South-East Asia. Today, after years of persecution and habitat loss, it is the most endangered stork in the world with as few as 1,200 remaining in the Indian states of Assam and Bihar, and small numbers in Cambodia. The adjutant is both a wetland bird and a scavenger but, edged out of its natural home, it has had to adapt to life in a human landscape. In Assam, where storks forage at rubbish dumps and nest in villages, an inspiring conservation movement may be the species best hope for survival.
.
Watch the film “Hargila” and find out more: https://bit.ly/3wYJ4PJ
.
Filmed for @cornellbirds with @andyjohnstonphoto - edited by @dansadowsky – color by @alkemiccolor
.
#greateradjutant #hargila #ilcp_photographers #conservationphotography #iucnredlist #endangeredspecies #guwahati #assam #indiaphotosociety

01/10/2022
Hargila Trailer

Please take some time to check out a new film I produced and filmed along with @andyjohnsonphoto and edited by @dansadowsky for @Cornellbirds Center for Conservation Media. It tells the story of a wildlife photographer (me 😆) who travels to India intent on documenting the rarest stork on earth, but soon discovers a conservation hero and her inspiring efforts to rally a community to save it.

Sat tuned as I'll be sharing the story of Purnima Devi Barman, The Hargila Army, and the Greater Adjutant all week. Thanks! Link to the full film: https://bit.ly/3wYJ4PJ

01/08/2022

Such an Awesome video from Tragopan! Enjoy!

Photographing Herons with a Tragopan V6 Blind
01/08/2022
Photographing Herons with a Tragopan V6 Blind

Photographing Herons with a Tragopan V6 Blind

One of the biggest challenges in wildlife photography is getting close to subjects. A photography blind is one of the most important tools in a wildlife phot...

Still time to get my big, beautifully printed, 2022 Birds of the Pacific Northwest calendar! Link in bio 👆👆👆.The physica...
12/17/2021

Still time to get my big, beautifully printed, 2022 Birds of the Pacific Northwest calendar! Link in bio 👆👆👆
.
The physical feats of long-distance migratory birds are among the most awe-inspiring in the animal kingdom. And one Pacific Northwest bird, the Calliope Hummingbird, is not only the smallest bird to breed in North America but also the smallest long-distance avian migrant in the world. Each year, most migrate more than 5,000 miles to and from wintering grounds in southwest Mexico, fueled by the nectar of wildflowers and powered by a body weighing less than three paper clips. Each time I stumble across the “little star” flashing its brilliant magenta gorget in a mountain meadow, I am reminded of the miracles all around us in nature.
.
.
.
#calliopehummingbird #your_best_birds #best_birds_of_ig #planetbirds #best_birds_of_world #birds_private #bestbirdshots #nuts_about_birds #birds_brilliance #birdfreaks #birds_captures #eye_spy_birds #birdsofinstagram #birdsplanet #birds.nature #birdphotographer #birdphotography #featured_wildlife #mothernaturenetwork #naturephotography #pnw #pnwonderland #pnwphotographer #pnwdiscovered #hummingbirdphotography #hummingbirdsofinstagram #2022calendar

If giant trees—fir, spruce, hemlock, and cedar—define the visual grandeur of Northwest forests, it is one of their small...
12/12/2021

If giant trees—fir, spruce, hemlock, and cedar—define the visual grandeur of Northwest forests, it is one of their smallest residents, the diminutive Pacific Wren, that defines their sound. Its cascading song of trills, rambles, and musical phrases is ubiquitous in spring, as each male perches prominently above the forest floor and, with a voice that far exceeds his size, proclaims his territory to all within earshot. Even in the darkest days of winter, when the forest’s migratory songbirds have departed and only the wind can be heard in the boughs above, the Pacific Wren is there. Lurking in dark recesses among sword ferns, salmonberry, and salal. Inspecting the mossy, pungent nooks of fallen trees for its next meal. Waiting for the first hints of spring when it will rise again and fill the cathedral forests with song.
.
From my Birds of the Pacific Northwest 2022 Calendar - link in bio 👆
.
.
.
#pacificwren #2022calendar #pnwonderland #best_birds_of_world #birds_private #nuts_about_birds #birds_brilliance #birdfreaks #birds_captures #birdsofinstagram #birds.nature #eye_spy_birds #tragopanblinds #wildlife_perfection #nuts_about_wildlife #pnwphotographer #pnwisbest #pnwexplorations

Looking to level up your bird photography? Check out this holiday bundle from @tragopanblinds featuring my best selling ...
12/10/2021

Looking to level up your bird photography? Check out this holiday bundle from @tragopanblinds featuring my best selling guide to bird photography, “Photography: Birds” and a Grouse photo blind!

I cased you missed them, holiday deals over at @tragopanblinds
11/29/2021

I cased you missed them, holiday deals over at @tragopanblinds

Most Tufted Puffins live far out at sea or on offshore islands at northern latitudes, so many of us see them only in bir...
11/23/2021

Most Tufted Puffins live far out at sea or on offshore islands at northern latitudes, so many of us see them only in bird books. Growing up in Michigan, I never had an opportunity to see one until I moved to Oregon and made my way to Cannon Beach on an August morning to look for them at Haystack Rock, one of the most accessible nesting colonies in the United States. A lot has changed since I saw those puffins buzzing around their earthen burrows—their population has declined by as much as 95 percent in Oregon and Washington. Puffins depend on healthy oceans to make a living and raise their chicks, and climate change is disrupting their way of life. For now, you can still see a few of them at Haystack Rock, but unless we humans make profound changes in the way we treat the natural world, there will come a day when the Tufted Puffin no longer breeds in our region.
.
From my 2022 Birds of the Pacific Northwest calendar available through the link in my bio. Makes a great holiday gift!
.
.
.
#birdphotographer #eye_spy_birds #birds.nature #birdsofinstagram #bird_brilliance #puffin #tuftedpuffin #haystackrock #birdfreaks #nuts_about_birds #birds_private #best_birds_of_world #best_birds_of_ig #mothernaturenetwork #featured_wildlife #cannonbeach #pnwonderland #pnwadventures #pnwartist #2022calendar @mtnbooks @mountaineersorg @braidedriver @portlandaudubon

Kit Fox kit and two vigilant parents form Montana this summer. For more on this encounter, and how I got the shot using ...
11/19/2021

Kit Fox kit and two vigilant parents form Montana this summer. For more on this encounter, and how I got the shot using my Tragopan Photography Blind, signup for the newsletter here: https://www.subscribepage.com/l2h6b6_copy

The dry forests east of the Cascade crest are home to one of my favorite Pacific Northwest organisms—the ponderosa pine....
11/16/2021

The dry forests east of the Cascade crest are home to one of my favorite Pacific Northwest organisms—the ponderosa pine. This ruddy tree with its puzzle-piece bark dominates the landscape and provides habitat for a unique cast of forest-dwelling songbirds. An easy walk across the soft pine straw of an open, parklike stand of ponderosa may reveal birds specifically evolved for this habitat like the Pygmy Nuthatch, White-headed Woodpecker, and one of my favorites, the Cassin’s Finch. Males are plump and rosy, while females are a streaky brown. Both are beautiful birds, but it is the male’s song I like the best—a garrulous warble punctuated by mimicked notes and phrases they have learned and stolen from their forest neighbors—another avian feat to marvel at on a forest stroll.

From my 2022 Birds of the Pacific Northwest calendar (link in bio)
.
.
.
#bestbirdshots #2022calendar #pnwonderland #pdx #best_birds_of_world #best_birds_of_ig #birds.nature #eye_spy_birds #birdphotographer #kings_birds_ #birds_brilliance #bbcwildlifemagazine #animalife_world #featured_wildlife

I’ll never forget the day I saw this owl, simply because it was so cold. It was the kind of frigid winter day when car t...
11/02/2021

I’ll never forget the day I saw this owl, simply because it was so cold. It was the kind of frigid winter day when car tires on snow sound like twisting Styrofoam, and the world is so still and quiet the ringing croak of a raven can be heard a half mile away. I was slowly driving the back roads of Washington’s Okanogan County and scanning willow thickets and treetops for anything alive when I saw him—a puffed-up bird about the size of a baseball, with fierce yellow eyes. I stopped and left the comfort of my car, feeling the rush of cold air burning deep in my lungs. While I futzed with my camera, he paid little attention to me. He just sat and stared, waiting and watching for the slightest movement of a mouse beneath the blanket of snow or a careless songbird alighting close by, focused only on snatching a meal to get him through another day.

From my Birds of teh Pacific Northwest 2022 calendar. Available through the link in my bio👆
.
.
.
#northernpygmyowl #pygmyowl #bird_brilliance #bird_watchers_daily #bird_freaks #bird_extreme #bird_lovers #mountaineersbooks #pnwonderland #pnwlife #pnwbirds

Hi Everyone, I'm dipping my toes into the vlogoshpere with this first attempt at a Field Vlog, where I take a Tragopan V...
10/29/2021
Photographing Herons with a Tragopan V6 Blind

Hi Everyone, I'm dipping my toes into the vlogoshpere with this first attempt at a Field Vlog, where I take a Tragopan V6 Photography Blind to an Oregon wetland to shoot a Great Blue Heron and Great Egret feeding frenzy.

Check it out, please share with your photog friends, and take it easy on me :)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tSA5r4BfjG8&t=71s

One of the biggest challenges in wildlife photography is getting close to subjects. A photography blind is one of the most important tools in a wildlife phot...

Address

Portland
97086-97299

Alerts

Be the first to know and let us send you an email when Gerrit Vyn Photography posts news and promotions. Your email address will not be used for any other purpose, and you can unsubscribe at any time.

Contact The Business

Send a message to Gerrit Vyn Photography:

Videos

Category

ABOUT

Gerrit Vyn is a Wildlife Photographer and Cinematographer for the Cornell Lab of Ornithology, a Senior Fellow at the International League of Conservation Photographers and has been photographing birds and wildlife professionally for the last 25 years. His most recent book, The Living Bird, was a New York Times Bestseller and National Outdoor Book Award winner. He is best known for his work documenting endangered birds and conservation issues around the world and is a sought-after speaker on topics of birds, conservation and photography. His work is published regularly in magazines including National Geographic, BBC Wildlife and Audubon, and has been featured in media outlets including NPR's Fresh Air with Terry Gross, CBS Sunday Morning, and PBS Nature. Find me on Instagram @gerritvyn and watch for my new instructional book on bird photography in spring 2020.


Other Portland media companies

Show All

Comments

While most owls require the high canopies and complex understory of old-growth forest to hunt and nest, the northern pygmy owl thrives in open, urban forests. To learn more: bit.ly/3LVW2Vl 📷 Gerrit Vyn Photography
This northern pygmy owl is just seven inches tall—about the size of a portly bluebird. To read our most recent Spotlight: bit.ly/3LVW2Vl 📷 Gerrit Vyn Photography
#takeover Gerrit Vyn Photography // Purnima visits local schools, not only to educate children about the species, but to spread the word about the Hargilla Army. Children play an important role in motivating their parents to protect the nests on their property. . @cornellbirds photographer and iLCP Fellow @gerritvyn collected the first comprehensive natural history coverage of the Greater Adjutant to inspire local and international support for Greater Adjutant conservation. Watch the film “Hargila” now on YouTube: https://bit.ly/3wYJ4PJ . The Greater Adjutant is a large scavenging stork that was once widely distributed across India and Southeast Asia but is now confined to a last stronghold in Assam, India, with small populations persisting in Cambodia’s northern plains region. The species is classified as Endangered by the IUCN with a rapidly declining population of around 1,200 individuals. The key threats to the species are direct human persecution, particularly at nesting colonies, habitat destruction, including felling of nest-trees, and drainage, conversion, pollution and degradation of wetlands. Historically, adjutants bred during the dry season, taking advantage of abundant prey steadily trapped by receding water levels, and scavenging the remains of now extirpated megafauna. Today, the last adjutants survive alongside humans, congregating at garbage dumps and nesting colonially in rural villages. Through the efforts of a remarkable conservation leader, Dr. Purnima Devi Barman, the birds are now protected, celebrated, and increasing their numbers locally. . To directly support the work of the Hargila Army visit https://secure.qgiv.com/for/purfun
#takeover Gerrit Vyn Photography // Stork statues are loaded into a van to be taken to a local celebration. The species is now part of the local identity, with villagers taking a sense of pride in and ownership of the birds. Hargilla Army members also weave and sell stork-adorned clothing, which not only earns them an income, but more deeply connects the bird with Assamese culture. . @cornellbirds photographer and iLCP Fellow @gerritvyn collected the first comprehensive natural history coverage of the Greater Adjutant to inspire local and international support for Greater Adjutant conservation. Watch the film “Hargila” now on YouTube: https://bit.ly/3wYJ4PJ . The Greater Adjutant is a large scavenging stork that was once widely distributed across India and Southeast Asia but is now confined to a last stronghold in Assam, India, with small populations persisting in Cambodia’s northern plains region. The species is classified as Endangered by the IUCN with a rapidly declining population of around 1,200 individuals. The key threats to the species are direct human persecution, particularly at nesting colonies, habitat destruction, including felling of nest-trees, and drainage, conversion, pollution and degradation of wetlands. Historically, adjutants bred during the dry season, taking advantage of abundant prey steadily trapped by receding water levels, and scavenging the remains of now extirpated megafauna. Today, the last adjutants survive alongside humans, congregating at garbage dumps and nesting colonially in rural villages. Through the efforts of a remarkable conservation leader, Dr. Purnima Devi Barman, the birds are now protected, celebrated, and increasing their numbers locally. . To directly support the work of the Hargila Army visit https://secure.qgiv.com/for/purfun
#takeover Gerrit Vyn Photography Since Purnima’s work began, Assam’s Greater Adjutant population has increased by 50 per cent, with the number of nests rising from 40 to 270. The Hargilla Army is now 400-strong, with 10,500 women benefitting from the movement and pledging to join its ranks. . Cornell Lab of Ornithology photographer and iLCP Fellow Gerrit Vyn collected the first comprehensive natural history coverage of the Greater Adjutant to inspire local and international support for Greater Adjutant conservation. Watch the film “Hargila” now on YouTube: https://bit.ly/3wYJ4PJ . The Greater Adjutant is a large scavenging stork that was once widely distributed across India and Southeast Asia but is now confined to a last stronghold in Assam, India, with small populations persisting in Cambodia’s northern plains region. The species is classified as Endangered by the IUCN with a rapidly declining population of around 1,200 individuals. The key threats to the species are direct human persecution, particularly at nesting colonies, habitat destruction, including felling of nest-trees, and drainage, conversion, pollution and degradation of wetlands. Historically, adjutants bred during the dry season, taking advantage of abundant prey steadily trapped by receding water levels, and scavenging the remains of now extirpated megafauna. Today, the last adjutants survive alongside humans, congregating at garbage dumps and nesting colonially in rural villages. Through the efforts of a remarkable conservation leader, Dr. Purnima Devi Barman, the birds are now protected, celebrated, and increasing their numbers locally. . To directly support the work of the Hargila Army visit https://secure.qgiv.com/for/purfun
#takeover Gerrit Vyn Photography // Chicks that fall from nest are now rescued by villagers with help from the local police and are cared for and released by the hospital at Assam State Zoo. . Cornell Lab of Ornithology photographer and iLCP Fellow Gerrit Vyn collected the first comprehensive natural history coverage of the Greater Adjutant to inspire local and international support for Greater Adjutant conservation. Watch the film “Hargila” now on YouTube: https://bit.ly/3wYJ4PJ . The Greater Adjutant is a large scavenging stork that was once widely distributed across India and Southeast Asia but is now confined to a last stronghold in Assam, India, with small populations persisting in Cambodia’s northern plains region. The species is classified as Endangered by the IUCN with a rapidly declining population of around 1,200 individuals. The key threats to the species are direct human persecution, particularly at nesting colonies, habitat destruction, including felling of nest-trees, and drainage, conversion, pollution and degradation of wetlands. Historically, adjutants bred during the dry season, taking advantage of abundant prey steadily trapped by receding water levels, and scavenging the remains of now extirpated megafauna. Today, the last adjutants survive alongside humans, congregating at garbage dumps and nesting colonially in rural villages. Through the efforts of a remarkable conservation leader, Dr. Purnima Devi Barman, the birds are now protected, celebrated, and increasing their numbers locally. . To directly support the work of the Hargila Army visit https://secure.qgiv.com/for/purfun
#takeover Gerrit Vyn Photography // Members of the ‘Hargilla Army’, a conservation movement founded by biologist Purnima Devi Barman, practice song and dance for the annual adjutant ‘baby shower’. Purnima has spent a decade on the ground in local villages where the stork’s nest, educating women of the species’ importance, and galvanizing support for their conservation. In addition to songs and celebration, members monitor trees, protect nests and participate in awareness campaigns. . Cornell Lab of Ornithology photographer and iLCP Fellow Gerrit Vyn collected the first comprehensive natural history coverage of the Greater Adjuant to inspire local and international support for Greater Adjutant conservation. Watch the film “Hargila” now on YouTube: https://bit.ly/3wYJ4PJ. . The Greater Adjutant is a large scavenging stork that was once widely distributed across India and Southeast Asia but is now confined to a last stronghold in Assam, India, with small populations persisting in Cambodia’s northern plains region. The species is classified as Endangered by the IUCN with a rapidly declining population of around 1,200 individuals. The key threats to the species are direct human persecution, particularly at nesting colonies, habitat destruction, including felling of nest-trees, and drainage, conversion, pollution and degradation of wetlands. Historically, adjutants bred during the dry season, taking advantage of abundant prey steadily trapped by receding water levels, and scavenging the remains of now extirpated megafauna. Today, the last adjutants survive alongside humans, congregating at garbage dumps and nesting colonially in rural villages. Through the efforts of a remarkable conservation leader, Dr. Purnima Devi Barman, the birds are now protected, celebrated, and increasing their numbers locally. . To directly support the work of the Hargila Army visit http://ow.ly/OYiE50Ht67z
#takeover Gerrit Vyn Photography Adjutant chicks – usually three or four to a nest – feed voraciously when adults arrive with food. The larger nestlings often outcompete their smaller siblings, who can die of starvation or fall from their nest as a result. Courtship and egg-laying occurs in November and the last of the chicks fledge in March. . Cornell Lab of Ornithology photographer and iLCP Fellow @gerritvyn collected the first comprehensive natural history coverage of the Greater to inspire local and international support for Greater Adjutant conservation. Watch the film “Hargila” now on YouTube: https://bit.ly/3wYJ4PJ . The Greater Adjutant is a large scavenging stork that was once widely distributed across India and Southeast Asia but is now confined to a last stronghold in Assam, India, with small populations persisting in Cambodia’s northern plains region. The species is classified as Endangered by the IUCN with a rapidly declining population of around 1,200 individuals. The key threats to the species are direct human persecution, particularly at nesting colonies, habitat destruction, including felling of nest-trees, and drainage, conversion, pollution and degradation of wetlands. Historically, adjutants bred during the dry season, taking advantage of abundant prey steadily trapped by receding water levels, and scavenging the remains of now extirpated megafauna. Today, the last adjutants survive alongside humans, congregating at garbage dumps and nesting colonially in rural villages. Through the efforts of a remarkable conservation leader, Dr. Purnima Devi Barman, the birds are now protected, celebrated, and increasing their numbers locally. . To directly support the work of the Hargila Army visit https://secure.qgiv.com/for/purfun