Mountain Gazette

Mountain Gazette The Mountain Gazette serves Bolton, Cambridge, Jericho, Underhill, Westford, and Jeffersonville, Vermont
(10)

03/26/2020

LEAHY: Coronavirus Emergency Relief Bill
Will Bring Nearly $2 Billion to Vermont



Leahy was the lead Democratic negotiator on a
key emergency spending title of the bill



WASHINGTON (Wednesday, March 25) – Vermont Senator Patrick Leahy announced Thursday that Vermont is poised to receive nearly $2 billion in federal resources in the emergency spending package poised to pass Congress this week. The Senate passed it at Midnight. Leahy, as the Vice Chairman of the Senate Appropriations Committee, is a lead negotiator of provisions in the bill that will direct formula funding to the state to combat the spread of COVID-19 and support those on the front lines caring for the sick.



Chief among the federal resources coming to the state will be $1.25 billion through the Coronavirus Relief Fund, established to support state and counties that are addressing the economic devastation brought about by the virus. Leahy pushed for a small state minimum for the $150 billion fund, ensuring that Vermont would receive sufficient support.



Leahy said: “Vermont is already reeling from the impacts of the spread of the coronavirus. I have heard from hundreds of small businesses and entities across the state, struggling to support their employees and maintain their businesses. Meanwhile, our healthcare workers and first responders are dealing with supply shortages and management of care. Vermont had a front seat in writing and negotiating this bill. I am pleased that Vermont will receive this critical assistance, and know more will need to be done.”



The package unveiled on Wednesday will increase unemployment insurance benefits for displaced workers, and will support small businesses. It includes $100 billion to provide direct aid to health care institutions, and $16 billion to replenish the Strategic National Stockpile with critical medical supplies and personal protective equipment supplies, which are distributed to state and local health agencies, hospitals and other healthcare entities facing shortages during emergencies. The bill includes more than $30 billion to support K-12 education and higher education institutions. It also includes $9.5 billion to support farmers, including Vermont farmers, as they continue to feed communities and support local food systems.



Leahy announced that through formula grant funding, Vermont will receive an estimate:



· $5.4 million to support public health preparedness and response activities through the Centers for Disease Control;

· $4.7 million in Community Development Block Grant (CDBG) funding to support the expansion of community health facilities, child care centers, food banks, and senior services;

· $5 million in Community Service Block Grants to address the consequences of increasing unemployed and economic disruption;

· $4.3 million in Child Care Development Block Grants to support child care assistance to health care sector employees, emergency responders, sanitation workers and other works deemed essential during the corona virus response;

· $4.6 million for housing assistance grants through the Department of Housing and Urban Development;

· $4.1 million in the Low Income Home Energy Assistance Program (LIHEAP);

· $20 million to support public transportation emergency relief;

· $9.6 million to support the state’s airports;

· $3 million in election assistance grants;

· $2 million to support state and local law enforcement and corrections through the Byrne-Justice Assistance Grant (JAG) program;

· $826,000 through the National Endowment for the Arts and the National Endowment for the Humanities to support museums, libraries and other organizations that have been forced to shut their doors due to the virus;

· $175,000 to support small- and medium-sized manufacturers recover from the economic impacts of COVID-19 through the Manufacturing Extension Partnership program; and

· $862,000 in Emergency Preparedness Grants through the Federal Emergency Management Administration (FEMA).



Leahy said further: “Further stimulus measures will be needed, in Vermont and across the country. I am proud of the response that Governor Scott, his administration, and the leaders in the Vermont legislature to help Vermonters through this crisis. And I am proud of the sense of community that Vermonters are displaying as we work to stem the spread of this public health crisis. As friends and neighbors, we will weather this pandemic.”



A summary of the appropriations title of the Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security Act is available here.

Leahy Releases Appropriations SummaryOf Bipartisan Coronavirus Aid And Economic Relief Agreement WASHINGTON (WEDNESDAY, ...
03/26/2020
United States Senate Committee on Appropriations

Leahy Releases Appropriations Summary

Of Bipartisan Coronavirus Aid And Economic Relief Agreement



WASHINGTON (WEDNESDAY, March 25, 2020) – Senator Patrick Leahy (D-Vt.) Wednesday released the bipartisan Senate agreement to provide relief from the coronavirus pandemic to our nation’s families and working people. As Vice Chairman of the Senate Appropriations Committee, Leahy was a lead negotiator on the appropriations title of the relief package to provide direct assistance to the American people, preserve small businesses, and distribute billions of dollars in resources to hospitals, first responders, and those at the front line of the coronavirus pandemic. The Senate is expected to take up and pass the bill as soon as Wednesday afternoon.



Leahy said: “I have said from the beginning that our response to this crisis will come in phases as we address the evolving nature of the coronavirus pandemic. Today our response is providing direct assistance to the American people, injecting new resources where they are needed most, and moving our country a step closer to emerging from this crisis stronger than we were before.”



As Vice Chairman, Leahy negotiated several appropriations priorities in the relief package that provides new resources to help strained state, local, and tribal governments as they combat this pandemic; support for hospitals and health care workers on the front lines of this public health crisis; funding to purchase personal protective equipment and much needed medical equipment; support for law enforcement and first responders; funding for scientists researching treatments and vaccines; support for small businesses; support for local schools and universities; and funding for affordable housing and homelessness assistance programs. This funding is in addition to the $150 billion Coronavirus Relief Fund that will provide state, local, and tribal government with additional resources to address this pandemic.



The document provides a summary of how the $340 billion provided in Division B of the bill will address the needs of the American people as we confront the coronavirus pandemic. The summary does not reflect the mandatory or authorizing provisions of the agreement.



Appropriations summary prepared by the office of the Vice Chairman is available here: https://www.appropriations.senate.gov/download/032520-title-by-title-summary-final



Bill text is available here: The Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security (CARES) Act – Bill Text for Division B

United States Senate Committee on Appropriations

03/25/2020

Leahy, Sanders, Welch Ask USDA To Buy Dairy Products

For Emergency Distribution During COVID-19 Outbreak



(TUESDAY, March 24, 2020) – Vermont’s Congressional Delegation -- Senator Patrick Leahy (D-Vt.), Senator Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.) and Representative Peter Welch (D-Vt.) -- Tuesday asked that the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) make immediate purchases of dairy products and distribute them to low-income Americans through The Emergency Food Assistance Program (TEFAP).



In a joint letter, Leahy, Sanders, and Welch said: “COVID-19 will undoubtedly have widespread impacts on hunger and malnutrition. It is likely that many Americans will be without work, unable to afford adequate nutrition, increasing the strain on the charitable food system across the nation. Supplying local food banks with healthy dairy options will help ensure those in need receive critical nutrition during this challenging period.”



As food banks face a sharp increase in demand, experts are projecting that COVID-19 will cause significant disruptions for the dairy sector, including declining prices. This is especially concerning in states like Vermont, where dairy farms are central elements of the rural economy. Over the past 10 years, the United States has lost more than 17,000 dairy farms. Meanwhile the dairy industry faces a consistent oversupply of dairy products that continues to drive prices below the cost of production. This oversupply has led to vast amounts of dairy products in storage. Just last year, the United States had stores of 1.4 billion pounds of cheese alone. As Congress considers measures to help blunt the economic impacts of the coronavirus outbreak, USDA already has authority and funding to provide additional relief.



“For these reasons, we request that USDA immediately exercise its Section 32 authority to purchase additional dairy products for distribution through The Emergency Food Assistance Program (TEFAP), and to simplify and expedite its procurement process to ensure expeditious relief. In order to provide the assistance needed for food banks and other hunger organizations to meet this unprecedented nutritional need within our communities, as well as to help support our struggling domestic dairy industry, we ask that you make these purchases as soon as possible,” they said in the letter.

03/24/2020

Leahy Announces $3 Million Grant To Establish

National Center On Restorative Justice At Vermont Law School



. . . VLS Partnership With UVM And Others Will Advance
National Center to Promote Best Practices In Restorative Justice



(TUESDAY, March 24, 2020) – U.S. Senator Patrick Leahy (D-Vt.) Tuesday announced that Vermont Law School will receive a $3 million grant from the U.S. Department of Justice (DOJ) to establish the nation’s first National Center on Restorative Justice. Leahy, the Vice Chair of the Senate Appropriations Committee, has led a several-year effort to establish and fund the Center. Leahy also has been a leader on criminal justice reform as a leading member of the Senate Judiciary Committee.



The Center, a collaboration with the University of Vermont, the University of San Diego, DOJ’s Office of Justice Programs (OJP), and other partners, will focus on engaging criminal justice professionals, community members, educators, and social service providers with incarcerated individuals and broaden their understanding of the justice system and restorative justice. Through restorative justice practices, offenders are rehabilitated through reconciliation with victims, their communities and other means. The efforts are known to reduce recidivism, and help break the cycle of violence.



Leahy said: “To address the problem of mass incarceration of people in our country, we need to fundamentally rethink our approach to the justice system. By establishing a national center that will focus on engaging with the community, including our incarcerated population, we can begin to do just that. Vermont is an incubator of sound ideas, and the approaches to restorative justice education and training at Vermont Law School and the University of Vermont make this a fitting collaboration to host this new, national center. We want the new center to be a generator of workable solutions, and a catalyst for real change.”



Vermont Law School Dean and President Thomas McHenry said: “The award of this grant recognizes the groundbreaking work being done at Vermont Law School – the only law school in the country that awards a master’s degree in restorative justice – and the opportunity to share this expertise nationally.”



University of Vermont President Suresh Garimella said: “As a Land-Grant university, for UVM this center aligns strongly with our commitment to our community, our state, and our nation. Breaking the cycle of recidivism recognizes the potential for incarcerated individuals to turn their lives around and contribute to society in positive ways. We’re proud that Senator Leahy, our researchers, and our colleagues at the Vermont Law School are leaders in this important effort.”

Leahy has led efforts in Congress to establish a National Center on Restorative Justice. As Vice Chairman of the Senate Appropriations Committee he included funding in fiscal years 2019 and 2020 for the Department of Justice to establish the center. The new national center, based in South Royalton, will be a leading voice on educating, training, and engaging with the future leaders of the U.S. justice system.



“This grant demonstrates the commitment of the Department of Justice to research and support newly forming attitudes about punishment in the United States and the value of community-based resolutions to crime­,” said Robert Sand, founder of the Center for Justice Reform at Vermont Law School and former Windsor County prosecutor. “We look forward to working with our partner institutions and OJP’s Bureau of Justice Assistance to further the critical evolution of restorative justice efforts nationwide.”



Kathy Fox is Associate Dean of UVM’s College of Arts and Sciences, which will serve as the research hub for the new National Center. Fox said: “Pairing the educational expertise of the Vermont Law School with the interdisciplinary research strengths of the University of Vermont’s Justice Research Initiative, we are well poised to generate data-driven change focused on restorative justice practices in the United States.”

03/24/2020

Leahy Announces $3 Million Grant To Establish

National Center On Restorative Justice At Vermont Law School



. . . VLS Partnership With UVM And Others Will Advance
National Center to Promote Best Practices In Restorative Justice



(TUESDAY, March 24, 2020) – U.S. Senator Patrick Leahy (D-Vt.) Tuesday announced that Vermont Law School will receive a $3 million grant from the U.S. Department of Justice (DOJ) to establish the nation’s first National Center on Restorative Justice. Leahy, the Vice Chair of the Senate Appropriations Committee, has led a several-year effort to establish and fund the Center. Leahy also has been a leader on criminal justice reform as a leading member of the Senate Judiciary Committee.



The Center, a collaboration with the University of Vermont, the University of San Diego, DOJ’s Office of Justice Programs (OJP), and other partners, will focus on engaging criminal justice professionals, community members, educators, and social service providers with incarcerated individuals and broaden their understanding of the justice system and restorative justice. Through restorative justice practices, offenders are rehabilitated through reconciliation with victims, their communities and other means. The efforts are known to reduce recidivism, and help break the cycle of violence.



Leahy said: “To address the problem of mass incarceration of people in our country, we need to fundamentally rethink our approach to the justice system. By establishing a national center that will focus on engaging with the community, including our incarcerated population, we can begin to do just that. Vermont is an incubator of sound ideas, and the approaches to restorative justice education and training at Vermont Law School and the University of Vermont make this a fitting collaboration to host this new, national center. We want the new center to be a generator of workable solutions, and a catalyst for real change.”



Vermont Law School Dean and President Thomas McHenry said: “The award of this grant recognizes the groundbreaking work being done at Vermont Law School – the only law school in the country that awards a master’s degree in restorative justice – and the opportunity to share this expertise nationally.”



University of Vermont President Suresh Garimella said: “As a Land-Grant university, for UVM this center aligns strongly with our commitment to our community, our state, and our nation. Breaking the cycle of recidivism recognizes the potential for incarcerated individuals to turn their lives around and contribute to society in positive ways. We’re proud that Senator Leahy, our researchers, and our colleagues at the Vermont Law School are leaders in this important effort.”

Leahy has led efforts in Congress to establish a National Center on Restorative Justice. As Vice Chairman of the Senate Appropriations Committee he included funding in fiscal years 2019 and 2020 for the Department of Justice to establish the center. The new national center, based in South Royalton, will be a leading voice on educating, training, and engaging with the future leaders of the U.S. justice system.



“This grant demonstrates the commitment of the Department of Justice to research and support newly forming attitudes about punishment in the United States and the value of community-based resolutions to crime­,” said Robert Sand, founder of the Center for Justice Reform at Vermont Law School and former Windsor County prosecutor. “We look forward to working with our partner institutions and OJP’s Bureau of Justice Assistance to further the critical evolution of restorative justice efforts nationwide.”



Kathy Fox is Associate Dean of UVM’s College of Arts and Sciences, which will serve as the research hub for the new National Center. Fox said: “Pairing the educational expertise of the Vermont Law School with the interdisciplinary research strengths of the University of Vermont’s Justice Research Initiative, we are well poised to generate data-driven change focused on restorative justice practices in the United States.”

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Leahy Releases Appropriations Summary Of Bipartisan Coronavirus Aid And Economic Relief Agreement WASHINGTON (WEDNESDAY, March 25, 2020) – Senator Patrick Leahy (D-Vt.) Wednesday released the bipartisan Senate agreement to provide relief from the coronavirus pandemic to our nation’s families and working people. As Vice Chairman of the Senate Appropriations Committee, Leahy was a lead negotiator on the appropriations title of the relief package to provide direct assistance to the American people, preserve small businesses, and distribute billions of dollars in resources to hospitals, first responders, and those at the front line of the coronavirus pandemic. The Senate is expected to take up and pass the bill as soon as Wednesday afternoon. Leahy said: “I have said from the beginning that our response to this crisis will come in phases as we address the evolving nature of the coronavirus pandemic. Today our response is providing direct assistance to the American people, injecting new resources where they are needed most, and moving our country a step closer to emerging from this crisis stronger than we were before.” As Vice Chairman, Leahy negotiated several appropriations priorities in the relief package that provides new resources to help strained state, local, and tribal governments as they combat this pandemic; support for hospitals and health care workers on the front lines of this public health crisis; funding to purchase personal protective equipment and much needed medical equipment; support for law enforcement and first responders; funding for scientists researching treatments and vaccines; support for small businesses; support for local schools and universities; and funding for affordable housing and homelessness assistance programs. This funding is in addition to the $150 billion Coronavirus Relief Fund that will provide state, local, and tribal government with additional resources to address this pandemic. The document provides a summary of how the $340 billion provided in Division B of the bill will address the needs of the American people as we confront the coronavirus pandemic. The summary does not reflect the mandatory or authorizing provisions of the agreement. Appropriations summary prepared by the office of the Vice Chairman is available here: https://www.appropriations.senate.gov/download/032520-title-by-title-summary-final Bill text is available here: The Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security (CARES) Act – Bill Text for Division B
Leahy, Sanders, Welch Ask USDA To Buy Dairy Products For Emergency Distribution During COVID-19 Outbreak (TUESDAY, March 24, 2020) – Vermont’s Congressional Delegation -- Senator Patrick Leahy (D-Vt.), Senator Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.) and Representative Peter Welch (D-Vt.) -- Tuesday asked that the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) make immediate purchases of dairy products and distribute them to low-income Americans through The Emergency Food Assistance Program (TEFAP). In a joint letter, Leahy, Sanders, and Welch said: “COVID-19 will undoubtedly have widespread impacts on hunger and malnutrition. It is likely that many Americans will be without work, unable to afford adequate nutrition, increasing the strain on the charitable food system across the nation. Supplying local food banks with healthy dairy options will help ensure those in need receive critical nutrition during this challenging period.” As food banks face a sharp increase in demand, experts are projecting that COVID-19 will cause significant disruptions for the dairy sector, including declining prices. This is especially concerning in states like Vermont, where dairy farms are central elements of the rural economy. Over the past 10 years, the United States has lost more than 17,000 dairy farms. Meanwhile the dairy industry faces a consistent oversupply of dairy products that continues to drive prices below the cost of production. This oversupply has led to vast amounts of dairy products in storage. Just last year, the United States had stores of 1.4 billion pounds of cheese alone. As Congress considers measures to help blunt the economic impacts of the coronavirus outbreak, USDA already has authority and funding to provide additional relief. “For these reasons, we request that USDA immediately exercise its Section 32 authority to purchase additional dairy products for distribution through The Emergency Food Assistance Program (TEFAP), and to simplify and expedite its procurement process to ensure expeditious relief. In order to provide the assistance needed for food banks and other hunger organizations to meet this unprecedented nutritional need within our communities, as well as to help support our struggling domestic dairy industry, we ask that you make these purchases as soon as possible,” they said in the letter.
Senate Appropriations Committee Vice Chairman Patrick Leahy (D-Vt.) REAX To Senate Passage Of The Families First Coronavirus Response Act Wednesday, March 18, 2020 Today the Senate took a crucial first step to meet the American people where they are in this crisis by ensuring emergency, paid sick leave, enhancing unemployment insurance, and providing new funds to support nutrition programs, which will come under increasing strain during this crisis. Importantly, the bill also guarantees affordable testing, which is a necessary step to finally understanding the full scope of this disease in our country. But we must view our response to this crisis in phases that evolve and respond to the changing nature of this crisis. Like the bill we passed today, our next phase must also be bipartisan. Members on both sides of the aisle, myself included, have concerns with certain parts of this bill, but as we confront this pandemic we cannot stand upon our partisan differences while the American people suffer. Everyone had to give a little to allow us to move forward. Now is not the time for politics and partisan bills. As we negotiate the next coronavirus bill, we must continue to put families first by providing immediate assistance to the millions of people who are out of work because of this virus today. We must also increase our efforts to support medical care providers as they brace for this pandemic. And we must support our small businesses, cities, and towns who do not have the resources to weather this storm. Finally, I want to thank Vermonters and the American people for the sacrifices they are making by practicing social distancing and following the recommended guidelines to keep themselves and their communities safe. I profoundly thank medical care providers, grocery store staff, state and local government workers, truckers, bank tellers, journalists and all of those continuing to do the important and necessary work on the front lines of this crisis.
Leahy Announces $4.9 Million In Emergency Grants To Combat Coronavirus In Vermont . . . Funds Come From The Leahy-Led Emergency Coronavirus Package Enacted Last Friday WASHINGTON (WEDNESDAY, March 11, 2020) – Senator Patrick Leahy (D-Vt.), Vice Chairman of the Senate Appropriations Committee, Wednesday announced that Vermont will receive $4.9 million in grants to combat the novel coronavirus. Leahy was a lead negotiator of the $8.3 billion emergency coronavirus supplemental appropriations package that was signed into law last week. The grants were awarded from the nearly $1 billion in Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Public Health Emergency Preparedness (PHEP) program grants included in the supplemental. Leahy said: “Vermonters are not looking for rhetoric when they are facing the reality of a pandemic. We wrote and passed this emergency aid package intending that CDC and other agencies expedite the implementation of our plan, and I commend CDC for acting on this in the span of just a few days. These grants will support the efforts on the ground in Vermont, and I commend the cooperation and tireless efforts of Governor Scott, local leaders and the health care community as we work together to address this crisis in Vermont and beyond our borders.” The grants will be awarded to state and local governments to support response and mitigation efforts across the state, including: monitoring, testing, controlling the potential for spread, and mitigation activities. Should the coronavirus continue to spread across the state, Vermont is eligible to receive further, direct assistance under the PHEP program. Vermonters looking for more information on the coronavirus can visit: · www.CDC.gov · https://www.healthvermont.gov/response/infectious-disease/2019-novel-coronavirus · https://www.leahy.senate.gov/issues/coronavirus-information A full summary of the supplemental appropriations bill signed into law last week is available here:https://www.appropriations.senate.gov/imo/media/doc/Coronavirus%20Supplemental_Summary.pdf Wednesday, Leahy and Senate Democrats announced the outline for the next steps Congress can take to help the American people, not corporations, through targeted economic and community relief. You can read more here: https://www.democrats.senate.gov/newsroom/press-releases/senate-democratic-leaders-announce-targeted-new-economic-and-community-relief-proposal-to-help-states-with-coronavirus-outbreaks
Sunrise Physical Therapy staff!
All are invited to the 2019 Underhill Historical Society annual Blueberry Social to be held on Sunday July 28th from 3pm until 6pm at the newly restored and decorated Old District 5 Schoolhouse on the Pleasant Valley Road just passed the Village of Underhill Center on the way to Cambridge. Please bring your favorite blueberry dessert (or another dessert) to share while we all enjoy tapping our feet to the sounds of Eric Bushey's Bluegrass Band! This event is FREE and will happen Rain or Shine. For more details contact Jean Archibald at 800-5219 or Connie Gallagher at 899-3034.