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Civil War Times Magazine

Civil War Times Magazine To subscribe click http://shop.historynet.com Founded in 1962, Civil War Times has constantly evolved to remain the diverse, definitive and exciting voice on the conflict that tore the country apart.

Rich narratives, new research and the best maps anywhere.

The Hero of Lookout MountainCaptain John Wilson, of Company C, 8th Kentucky Infantry, is recognized as the first Union v...
11/24/2022

The Hero of Lookout Mountain

Captain John Wilson, of Company C, 8th Kentucky Infantry, is recognized as the first Union volunteer to plant the regiment’s battle flag on the summit of Lookout Mountain #OnThisDay, Nov. 24, 1863, during the “Battle of the Clouds.” In his own words Captain Wilson said, “Brig. Gen. Walter C. Whitaker of Kentucky came to our regiment and said to Col. Sidney M. Barnes: ‘Col. Barnes, have you an officer that will volunteer to carry your flag and place it on the top of the Mountain?’ I said, ‘General, I will go.’ Turning to the regiment, he said, ‘How many of you will go with Capt. Wilson? I could order you up there, but will not, for it is a hazardous undertaking; but for the flag that gets there first it will be an honor.’” Five men went with Wilson, who described the undertaking this way: “Dim daylight was dawning. We crept cautiously upward, clutching at rocks and bush, supporting each other, using sticks and poles and such other aids as we could gather. At every step we expected to be greeted with deadly missiles of some sort from the enemy. But fortune favored us, and before sun-up, I, in front, reached the summit and planted the flag on top of Lookout Mountain. It was the highest flag that was planted during the war. Soon other detachments came up and congratulated me and my party, and we were the lions of the day in the Union Army.”

Happy Thanksgiving from all of us at Civil War Times magazine!
11/24/2022

Happy Thanksgiving from all of us at Civil War Times magazine!

11/23/2022

A Happy Thanksgiving message from Civil War Times magazine Editor Dana B. Shoaf and Director of Photography Melissa A. Winn. Thank you! Happy Holidays to all!

#HumpDayHistory(Civil War facts to get you through the longest day of the week)The Army Medical MuseumThe Army Medical M...
11/23/2022

#HumpDayHistory
(Civil War facts to get you through the longest day of the week)

The Army Medical Museum

The Army Medical Museum was established by U.S. Army Surgeon General William A. Hammond in 1862, as a center for research in military medicine and surgery. Hammond directed medical officers in the field to collect "specimens of morbid anatomy...together with projectiles and foreign bodies removed,” and to forward them to the newly founded museum for study. Civil War surgeon John Brinton served as the museum’s first curator and visited several mid-Atlantic battlefields, including Gettysburg, to report back to Hammond his observations on medical techniques, burials, and, more importantly, to collect the amputated limbs of the wounded and have them shipped in barrels back to Washington, D.C., for the museum. During and after the war, the museum staff took pictures of wounded soldiers showing the effects of gunshot wounds as well as results of amputations and other surgical procedures. The information collected was compiled into six volumes of "The Medical and Surgical History of the War of the Rebellion", published between 1870 and 1883.

#OnThisDay in 1863, the Battle of Chattanooga begins, ending three days later, and after several engagements, with a Uni...
11/23/2022
Battle Of Chattanooga

#OnThisDay in 1863, the Battle of Chattanooga begins, ending three days later, and after several engagements, with a Union victory.

Facts about the Battle Of Chattanooga, an 1863 Civil War Battle of the American Civil War Battle.

11/22/2022

#OnThisDay in 1963, President John F. Kennedy was assassinated. Seven months earlier, on April 7, 1963, he visted Antietam National Battlefield. View some footage of his visit here, courtesy of the John F. Kennedy Presidential Library and Museum.

Did George McClellan suffer from a messianic complex? How both the Union and Confederdacy believed they had God on their...
11/22/2022
In God We Trust: Did George B. McClellan Suffer from a Messianic Complex?

Did George McClellan suffer from a messianic complex? How both the Union and Confederdacy believed they had God on their side during the Civil War.

Did George McClellan suffer from a messianic complex? How both the Union and Confederdacy believed they had God on their side during the Civil War

Archaeologists can’t swing a metal detector without getting a hit.
11/21/2022
Can You Dig it? Archaeologists Take on Culp’s Hill

Archaeologists can’t swing a metal detector without getting a hit.

Archaeologists can’t swing a metal detector without getting a hit Archaeologists can’t swing a metal detector without getting a hit

These famous men left something behind besides their legacies. Here's where to visit the most famous body parts to, err,...
11/20/2022
5 Famous Body Parts From History That You Can Visit

These famous men left something behind besides their legacies. Here's where to visit the most famous body parts to, err, rest in pieces

These famous men left something behind besides their legacies. Here's where to visit the most famous body parts to, err, rest in pieces.

A little-discussed factor was the social revolution that preceded Vicksburg's surrender—the destruction of the plantatio...
11/20/2022
Vicksburg: Where Grant Learned How to Win the War

A little-discussed factor was the social revolution that preceded Vicksburg's surrender—the destruction of the plantation oligarchy and the liberation of 100,000 slaves.

An little-discussed factor was the social revolution that preceded Vicksburg's surrender—the destruction of the plantation oligarchy and the liberation of 100,000 slaves.

A tense interaction between green soldiers and agitated civilians results in murder.
11/20/2022
'Shoot and be Damned’

A tense interaction between green soldiers and agitated civilians results in murder.

A tense interaction between green soldiers and agitated civilians results in murder

Faced with a rampant prostitution crisis in Nashville, the U.S. Army tried a bold social experiment.
11/19/2022
Regulating Venus

Faced with a rampant prostitution crisis in Nashville, the U.S. Army tried a bold social experiment.

Faced with a rampant prostitution crisis in Nashville, the U.S. Army tried a bold social experiment

11/19/2022

Historian Allen Guelzo delivers the keynote address at the ceremonies commemorating the 159th anniversary of the Gettysburg Address delivered by Abraham Lincoln November 19, 1863.

11/19/2022

Author and Historian Jon Meacham recites the Gettysburg Address at Soldiers’ National Cemetery in Gettysburg National Military Park on the 159th anniversary of Abraham Lincoln’s historic address.

11/19/2022

A fine description of the meaning of the events #OnThisDay November 19, 1863, in Gettysburg Pennsylvania. From Bruce Catton’s “Glory Road,” part of his timeless Army of the Potomac trilogy.

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“There were thousands of people at this ceremony, and among them were certain wounded veterans who had come back to see all of this, and in a knot wandered away from the crowd around the speakers stand and strolled down along Cemetery Ridge, pausing when they reached a little clump of trees, and where they looked off toward the west and talked quietly about what they had seen and done there.

In front of them was the wide gentle valley of the shadow of death, brimming now with soft autumn light, and behind them the flags waved lazily about the speakers stand and the voice droned on, building up to a literary climax. The valley was a mile wide, and there was rolling ground where the Rebel guns had been ranked, and on the crest of this ridge was the space where a girlish artillery lieutenant had had a sergeant hold him up while he called for the last round of canister, the ground where file closers had gripped hands and dug in their heels to hold a wavering line together, the place where the noise of men desperately fighting had been heard as a great mournful roar; and the voice went on, and the governors looked dignified , and the veterans by the trees looked about them and saw again the fury and the smoke and the killing.

This then was the valley of dry bones, waiting for the word, which might or might not come in rhythmic prose that began with the customs of ancient Athens. The bones had laid there in the sun and rain and now were carefully arranged state by state under the new sod. They were the bones of men who had exulted in their youth, and some who had been unstained heroes while others had been scamps who had pillaged and robbed and ran away when they could, and they had died here, and that was the end of them. They had come here because of angry words and hot passions in which they had not shared. They had come too, because the drums had rolled and the bands had blared the swinging deceitful tunes piped men off to battle….three cheers for the red, white and blue, here’s a long look back at the girl I left behind me, John Browns body lies a-moldering in the grave but we go marching on, and Yankee Doodle on his spotted pony goes riding off into the eternal smoky mist of war.

Back of these men were innumerable long dusty roads reaching into the main street of a thousand youthful towns and villages where they had been bright flags overhead and people on the board sidewalks cheering and crying and waving a last good-by. It had seemed so once that there was some compelling reason to bring the men here-something so broad that it would encompass all of the horrible contradictory manifestations of the country’s pain and bewilderment, the riots and lynching’s, the hysterical conspiracies with their oaths written in blood, the hard hand that had been laid upon the country-side, the scramble for riches and the scheming for high place and the carried by quiet folk who just wanted to live at peace by the faith they used to have.

Perhaps there was meaning to all of this somewhere. Perhaps everything that the nation was and meant to be had come to focus here, beyond the graves and the remembered echo of the guns and the wreckage of lived that were gone forever. Perhaps the whole of it somehow was greater than the sum of its tragic parts, and perhaps here on this windswept hill the thing could be said at last, so the dry bones of the country dreams could take on flesh.

The orator finished, and after the applause had died away the tall man in the black frock coat got to his feet, with two little sheets of paper in his hand, and he looked out over the valley and began to speak.”

11/19/2022
#OnThisDay in 1863, President Abraham Lincoln delivers his famed Gettysburg Address.
11/19/2022
The Gettysburg Address

#OnThisDay in 1863, President Abraham Lincoln delivers his famed Gettysburg Address.

The full text of the Gettysburg Address, delivered by President Abraham Lincoln at the dedication of the Soldier’s National Cemetery.

The Lincoln Group of the District of Columbia won the prestigious Wendy Allen Award Thursday night, given annually by Th...
11/19/2022

The Lincoln Group of the District of Columbia won the prestigious Wendy Allen Award Thursday night, given annually by The Lincoln Forum at its annual seminar in Gettysburg, Pa. Lincoln Forum vice chairman Jonathan White said the award recognized the group’s "exceptional work helping the public learn about Abraham Lincoln and the Civil War era."

In the photo, from left to right, are Lincoln Group president David J. Kent, Wendy Allen, Jonathan White and Lincoln Forum chairman Harold Holzer. The award includes the Lincoln portrait in the photo painted by Allen, a noted Gettysburg-based artist and organizer of the 100 Nights of Taps held annually at the Gettysburg National Cemetery.

11/18/2022

Civil War Times Editor Dana B. Shoaf and Author and Historian Jonathan White discuss White’s recent works on Abraham Lincoln and African Americans at The Lincoln Forum.

11/18/2022

CWT Editor Dana B. Shoaf and Daniel Weinberg of the Abraham Lincoln Book Shop discuss some rare Lincoln-related artifacts at The Lincoln Forum.

11/18/2022

Civil War Times Editor Dana B. Shoaf and historian Hugh Goffinet discuss USCT stories and student scholars at The Lincoln Forum.

11/18/2022

Join CWT Editor Dana B. Shoaf on the Gettysburg Battlefield at Forbes’ Rock.

11/18/2022

Join CWT Editor Dana B. Shoaf on the Gettysburg Battlefield and find out about the fighting at Culp’s Hill.

11/18/2022

Join CWT Editor Dana B. Shoaf on the Gettysburg Battlefield at the Virginia monument.

No Shade for the 'Dictator'By Dana B. ShoafWhen I look at this image of the famous 13-inch mortar nicknamed the “Dictato...
11/18/2022

No Shade for the 'Dictator'
By Dana B. Shoaf

When I look at this image of the famous 13-inch mortar nicknamed the “Dictator,” taken some time between mid July and late August 1864 during the Siege of Petersburg, Va., I’m not only impressed with the size of the death-dealer, but also how “hot” this image feels. It must have been sizzling on that flatcar.

The gunners, members of the 1st Connecticut Heavy Artillery, have stripped to their shirtsleeves to fire the behemoth. Every time the mortar discharged, it caused the flatcar to roll backward 10 to 12 feet down the tracks.

This was the first position for the Dictator, it later moved to other locations, and if you visit Petersburg today, you’ll see the mortar displayed at its final position, on land at Union battery 5. No matter where the Dictator was located, it was throwing some high heat.

Photo: Library of Congress

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We enjoyed a very cold but incredibly special Remembrance Day weekend in Gettysburg. On Saturday, Dr. Broomall had the great honor of leading an interpretive tour of Culp’s Hill with Civil War Times Magazine editor Dana Shoaf. The crowd included Shepherd University alumni, personal friends, supporters of the GTM Center, and an enthusiastic audience who braved the low temperatures. Such moments on the battlefield, among friends and fellow students of the Civil War, are what make this work so meaningful. Special thanks to Chris Gwinn of Gettysburg National Military Park and Melissa Winn of Civil War Times.
We hope everyone enjoyed Veterans Day weekend! Thank you for your service to our nation, veterans. This photograph shows an unidentified Civil War veteran with an unidentified World War I soldier, likely a grandfather and grandson, photographed by James B. Schriever. Special thanks to Civil War Times Magazine for sharing this image. Photo: Library of Congress —— For more: pasadenacwrt.org Email: [email protected]
Survivor artifacts and memories: A detailed look at current plans for the new Sultana Disaster Museum in Marion, Ark., gallery by gallery.
National Park Service awards $345K in new grants to help restore battlefields in Virginia and Pennsylvania.
Steamboat Sultana will rise from the ashes as Arkansas city breaks ground on permanent museum focused on the Civil War maritime disaster.
Join us November 19! This walking tour of Culp's Hill, Gettysburg National Military Park, led by Dr. Broomall of the GTMC and Dana B. Shoaf of Civil War Times, will immerse participants in a variety of source materials to create a cultural history of the desperate fighting on July 2nd and account for its remembrance over time. First, we will use soldiers' words to guide the program and shed light on a fight defined by, in the words of a Confederate soldier, "confusion and disorder." Second, taking advantage of the National Park Service's recent battlefield rehabilitation, participants will consider how the natural environment facilitated the Union defense and later captivated photographers, artists, and tourists. Finally, through a consideration of monuments and relics, the tour will conclude by examining Culp's Hill in memory. Please park at Culp's Hill Tower, Slocum Avenue.
So awesome to see this! Thank you Civil War Times Magazine! Save Wyse Fork!
A team approach preserves Virginia Civil War redoubt at George Mason University, which is nestled in suburban sprawl. Here's how they did it.
Legendary Georgia football coach Vince Dooley had a passion for Civil War history. Here's what those who knew him say about that.
Amos Benson was born in September of 1825 in Maryland. His wife, Margaret Newman was born in May of 1821 and grew up in the vicinity of Sudley Springs. They were married sometime before 1850, according to records. In March of 1862, Amos joined Company A of the 4th Virginia Cavalry, and eventually rose to the rank of third corporal. Courtesy: Civil War Times Magazine Photo: National Park Service Photo —— For more: pasadenacwrt.org Email: [email protected]
Mosby Captures Gen. Stoughton… From His Bed In March 1863, notorious Confederate ranger John S. Mosby and his men knocked on the door of the home where Union General Edwin Stoughton was staying in Fairfax, Virginia. Stoughton was commanding the 2nd Vermont Brigade, which spent most of its career in the defense of Washington, D.C., in and around Fairfax. Rousing the General from his bed, Mosby asked, "Do you know Mosby, General?" The General replied "Yes! Have you got the rascal?" "No," said Mosby. "He's got you!" Along with Stoughton, Mosby and his men rounded up more than 30 other prisoners and dozens of horses. When informed of the incident, US President Abraham Lincoln reportedly said he minded the loss of the horses more than Stoughton, claiming he could make another brigadier general in five minutes, “but I cannot make more horses.” Courtesy: Civil War Times Magazine —— For more: pasadenacwrt.org Email: [email protected]
Perryville ky today for reenactment!
🚨 New episode out now! 🚨 : Just in time to start your week off the right way, we have a #brandnew episode! And this one kicks off the #fourthquarter! : We are joined by Dana Shoaf, the Managing Editor of Print for HistoryNet and Editor for the Civil War Times Magazine to talk about the life of Brigadier General Erastus B Tyler! : This is our first real focused look at a single individual on the #podcast instead of covering an overall event and boy were we glad Dana stopped by with this story! : Download this episode and all episodes of @thehistorythingspodcast NOW for FREE on all major podcast apps! : Follow us on as well on #Facebook and #youtube and be sure to click ‘like,’ and ‘share!’ : Enjoying the show and looking for ways to help out? Leave us a review and a 5star rating wherever you listen to your podcasts! : The HistoryThingsPodcast is brought to you commercial-free by @TRHistorical. Shop TRHistorical.com and use our promo code: HISTORY THINGS to receive 10% off your next purchase! : Thanks for listening, we hope you enjoy the show! : #HistoryThingsPodcast #NewEpisode #CivilWar #CivilWarHistory #ErastusBTyler #History #Podcast #HistoryPodcast #General #HistoryNet #CivilWarTimes
Mathew Brady's photographs captured the reality of the Civil War. A new gravesite memorial celebrates the diversity of his subjects.
Devil's Den will reopen Friday (Sept. 30) after six-month rehabilitation project, Gettysburg park officials say.
Macon's Cannonball House will display military and other items from two time capsules placed with Confederate soldier monument.
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