Clicky

American History magazine

American History magazine American History magazine brings our readers exclusive stories touching on topics from first European contact to Cold War tensions. Visit our website for a free sample of our articles http://www.historynet.com/american-history.

Operating as usual

Mikhail Gorbachev, the final leader of the USSR, died at age 91 in Moscow today. Would the Cold War have continued, or b...
08/30/2022

Mikhail Gorbachev, the final leader of the USSR, died at age 91 in Moscow today.

Would the Cold War have continued, or been the same, without him?

Rowdy heading to his court martial for being AWOL for three hours while on sentry duty. The Coast Guard pooch was demote...
08/26/2022

Rowdy heading to his court martial for being AWOL for three hours while on sentry duty. The Coast Guard pooch was demoted from 1st class to 2nd class specialist, lost extra rations, and given time in the brig. Tender hearts (I mean, just look at that face) caused restoration of his 1st class rating the next day. #NationalDogDay

The Russian Jewish immigrant rose to become the "best goddamn madam in all America"—and pals with Duke Ellington, Milton...
08/23/2022
Who Was Polly Adler, the Celebrity Madame of the Roaring Twenties?

The Russian Jewish immigrant rose to become the "best goddamn madam in all America"—and pals with Duke Ellington, Milton Berle, and Lucky Luciano.

A Russian Jewish immigrant who arrived in New York alone, Polly Adler rose from poverty to become the "best goddamn madam in all America."

Phineas Taylor Barnum was a salesman and a showman, a hustler and a huckster. He sold bibles for a while, but he made mo...
08/21/2022
P.T. Barnum - The Greatest Showman on Earth | HistoryNet

Phineas Taylor Barnum was a salesman and a showman, a hustler and a huckster. He sold bibles for a while, but he made more money selling tickets to see a "mermaid."

How the emperor of hoopla got his start at scamming

So familiar is the mantra that TV viewers can chant along with any actor playing a cop taking a suspect into custody: "Y...
08/21/2022
History of Miranda Rights: Why You Have the Right to Remain Silent | HistoryNet

So familiar is the mantra that TV viewers can chant along with any actor playing a cop taking a suspect into custody: "You have the right to remain silent." Here's why.

Law enforcement TV viewers are well familiar with the phrase: "You have the right to remain silent." But real officers didn't always have to say that.

Xenophobic attitudes shaped U.S. immigration policy, complicating the lives of many Asian Americans who went from being ...
08/20/2022
How Anti-Asian Hate Became Rooted in America's Immigration Laws | HistoryNet

Xenophobic attitudes shaped U.S. immigration policy, complicating the lives of many Asian Americans who went from being invisible to being dehumanized.

Xenophobic attitudes shaped U.S. immigration policy, complicating the lives of many Asian Americans who went from being invisible to being dehumanized

World War II ended on the deck of the USS Missouri. Five years later the Korean War broke out—and the "Mighty Mo" was th...
08/18/2022
How WWII Battleship USS Missouri Became the First to Fight in the Korean War

World War II ended on the deck of the USS Missouri. Five years later the Korean War broke out—and the "Mighty Mo" was the only U.S. battleship ready to fight.

World War II ended on the deck of the USS Missouri. Five years later the Korean War broke out--and the "Mighty Mo" was the only U.S. battleship ready to fight.

Myths encrust George Washington like barnacles on a boat hull, and historian John Rhodehamel crisply explains why it is ...
08/18/2022
Can't Tell a Lie About GW? History Does | HistoryNet

Myths encrust George Washington like barnacles on a boat hull, and historian John Rhodehamel crisply explains why it is time to scrape them away.

Forget the myths and give the first president his due

Today’s polarization in Congress has nothing on its antebellum antecedent. Yale historian Joanne B. Freeman documents do...
08/17/2022
Capitol Crimes: Congressional Violence in Civil War Run-Up | HistoryNet

Today’s polarization in Congress has nothing on its antebellum antecedent. Yale historian Joanne B. Freeman documents dozens of literal brawls involving congressmen and senators as the conflict over slavery reached a boil.

Polarization turned bloody as politicians fought over slavery

Address

Vienna, VA

Opening Hours

Monday 9am - 5pm
Tuesday 9am - 5pm
Wednesday 9am - 5pm
Thursday 9am - 5pm
Friday 9am - 5pm

Telephone

(703) 771-9400

Alerts

Be the first to know and let us send you an email when American History magazine posts news and promotions. Your email address will not be used for any other purpose, and you can unsubscribe at any time.

Contact The Business

Send a message to American History magazine:

Videos

Nearby media companies


Other Magazines in Vienna

Show All

Comments

I'm a little concerned about the scholarship of American History. I look forward to each one received as I'm an avid fan of history. However, upon reading the article Tearful Traces and the featured comment "forced to trek the 5000 mile trail of tears ..." Well it's not 5000 miles from the Piedmont plane or northwest Georgia to the Cherokee Nation settlement in Oklahoma. In fact, it's less that 1000 miles. Much of what has been published on the subject is historical fiction. The story of the Cherokee nation is interesting and informative, but truth is valuable. I want to be able to depend on your publication for true history. Please separate fact and fiction when publishing it in your magazine.
September 11, 2001 The magnificent view, all around from the top of the pride of New York. The triumph of human enterprise overlooking the wonders of the great metropolis and the extraordinary beauty of the harbor. An exhilarating panorama from silent heights of the sky at sunset. And in the distance, the lighted symbol of our freedom. And then one day, in the clear early morning of a cruel day, the twin horrible columns of acrid black smoke billowing like a nightmare in the blue of the sky. The human tragedy of the assault of an inferno of flames that pushed people to jump to their death in the abyss of emptiness below. The deep shock, the scathing disarray the bitter bewilderment of the unbelievable. The devastation of a way of life. But we are Americans. And New Yorkers. We have both the right and the duty to look to the future. To show to ourselves that tragedies and obstacles (no matter how daunting) can only be a challenge that our resolve has the obligation to overcome. The obligation to build and grow, the courage to spearhead the advancement and enlightenment of the human spirit, the conquests of human ingenuity. To make the next generations proud of us.
"This book is one of the best biographies of an individual USCT soldier to reach the market in recent memory. It is very readable, well documented, and hard to put down. . . . This book is highly recommended for any Civil War enthusiast, especially those with an interest in the contributions of black soldiers to the Union victory."—Civil War News
Walter Mondale, former vice president to Jimmy Carter, has died at age 93. "I believe an open political process that invites new candidates into the race is crucial," said Mondale, in a 2016 interview with HistoryNet sister publication American History magazine , "It allows the public to hear the issues, to watch the candidates as they handle challenges." Check out the rest of the interview here:
Should Lincoln statues be moved from Chicago to downstate Lincoln? The president of Lincoln College has graciously offered to find a new home for the monuments if the city removes them. Let’s be serious. Not even the Great Emancipator had an unobscured 21st-century view on race relations. But his early legislative work did lead to the building of Chicago (I&M Canal, ICRR) and its creation as transportation hub of the continent. It’s still the case today. Honest Abe was one of our greatest builders. #Lincolnomicsjfw
Was Lincoln a “real” Republican? Well, prior to 1854, he wasn’t even a Republican in name only. He was a Whig, member of a party that advocated tariffs, national banking and “internal improvements” (infrastructure). When the question of slavery tore the Whig Party apart, Lincoln joined the anti-slavery Republicans, which was founded in Ripon, Wisconsin. #Lincolnomicsjfw
June's issue of American History magazine features iconic American journalist -- Martha Gellhorn -- on the cover. A strong-willed, self-made woman, Gellhorn paved the way for female journalists and did everything her own way, with passion and honesty. Pick up a copy of the magazine, or click the History Net link below, to learn more about this incredible woman. The piece is an adapted excerpt taken from Janet Somerville's book, "Yours, for Probably Always: Martha Gellhorn's Letters of Love and War, 1930-1949" Read the piece from American History Magazine here: http://ow.ly/HjPv50zPGq8 And learn more about the book here: http://ow.ly/1foz50zPGq7
In the 20th century, a lethal and terrifying virus captured America. 'Then - unlike now - the president displayed decisive leadership in fighting the virus', according to former visiting professor at Roosevelt Institute for American Studies Thomas Doherty in The Conversation UK. #Franklin D. Roosevelt Presidential Library and Museum #Brandeis University History Department #American Historical Association #The Journal of American History #American History magazine
Beloved columnist Ernie Pyle died 75 years ago, in April 1945. American History magazine revisits the time the plainspoken reporter inadvertently ended up discussing war philosophy with an up-and-coming Arthur Miller.
The story of America’s oldest white oak, 619 years, stood guard over a meeting between George Washington and Marquis de Lafayette. Distributed by 1091 Media, our film is now available for rent or purchase. Perfect for tree lovers and history buffs! #ArborDay https://geni.us/UnderTheGreatOak
**Help Support the Sailors' Snug Harbor Cemetery Memorial Campaign** @SSHMarinersGenealogy The Descendants of Sailors’ Snug Harbor Mariners have been reaching out to Historical and Genealogical Societies, Museums, Military Veterans Groups, and Concerned Citizens, to invite them to join a Letters of Support Campaign to support their efforts to gain access to the old Sailors’ Snug Harbor Cemetery on Staten Island, in New York City, to honor their Ancestors and all of the 6,500 Merchant and Naval Mariners interred there (1834-1976), by installing a Memorial Monument (Obelisk) and holding an annual Memorial Service. Some of the Mariners were famous Sea Captains and some sailed on famous Merchant and Naval ships dating back to the American Revolution. Many were just average seamen whom sailed and endured for many years on the sea under arduous conditions. https://www.findagrave.com/cemetery/2244490/sailors-snug-harbor-cemetery Sadly, the Sailors' Snug Harbor Cemetery is devoid of gravestones or markers, except for 15 remaining gravestones. The Cemetery is closed and not open to the public. The Board of Trustees of Sailors' Snug Harbor have rejected the Descendants' requests to access the SSH Cemetery to honor their Ancestors. https://nypost.com/2018/12/29/caretakers-shoot-down-plans-for-monument-for-fallen-sailors/ The Descendants are collecting Letters of Support to persuade the Trustees of Sailors’ Snug Harbor to change their decision. You can help support the Descendants by writing a Letter of Support using the Support Letter Writing Instructions at the following link: https://drive.google.com/open?id=1sZv5VFLNWw0HA-pW2i33RhbgVFQ6oExx
"From 1830 to 1860, members of the United States Congress committed more than 70 violent acts against one another. Joanne B. Freeman recounts how Southern Democrats’ attacks on critics of slavery spilled from the capitol building onto streets and dueling grounds. Read with brisk enthusiasm by the author, this audiobook shows how interpersonal incivility presaged and hastened civil war." - American History magazine