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Armed Forces Journal

Armed Forces Journal Strategy and analysis for military and defense leaders. Founded in 1863. Owned by HistoryNet.

They just don’t make them like Pappy anymore
01/29/2018
They just don’t make them like Pappy anymore

They just don’t make them like Pappy anymore

Marine Col. Gregory “Pappy” Boyington, the World War II ace and Medal of Honor recipient, was as well known for his flamboyant personality as his flying skills.

From the June 9, 1864 issue of Army and Navy Journal - estimated costs of a cavalry regiment
01/12/2018

From the June 9, 1864 issue of Army and Navy Journal - estimated costs of a cavalry regiment

Video: Lone Confederate Buried in Pennsylvania | HistoryNet
08/31/2017
Video: Lone Confederate Buried in Pennsylvania | HistoryNet

Video: Lone Confederate Buried in Pennsylvania | HistoryNet

Civil War Times Magazine Editor Dana Shoaf tells the story of William Hinson, a lone Confederate buried in the graveyard of the Old Log Church in Schellsburg, Pennsylvania.

Photos from Civil War Times Magazine's post
08/02/2017

Photos from Civil War Times Magazine's post

Photos from Civil War Times Magazine's post
06/07/2017

Photos from Civil War Times Magazine's post

FILM RECON: War Machine
05/30/2017
FILM RECON: War Machine

FILM RECON: War Machine

SNAPSHOT: Netflix’s War Machine gets some details right about Afghanistan in 2009-2010, but it suffers greatly by portraying its central character as a sort of Frankenstein's monster. The film follows General Glen McMahon (Brad Pitt), who assumes command of coalition forces in Afghanistan in 2009. B...

Close Call at Crooked Billet
05/01/2017
Close Call at Crooked Billet

Close Call at Crooked Billet

Ordered to cut off supplies to British troops occupying Philadelphia, a young Patriot officer played a deadly game of cat and mouse. Just before midnight on April 30, 1778, Brig. Gen. John Lacey Jr. walked the perimeter of his unit’s encampment north of the crossroads village of Crooked Billet, 17 m...

Battle Of Chancellorsville | HistoryNet
05/01/2017
Battle Of Chancellorsville | HistoryNet

Battle Of Chancellorsville | HistoryNet

Facts about Battle Of Chancellorsville, a major Civil War Battle of the American Civil War Battle Of Chancellorsville Summary: The Battle of Chancellorsville, April 30–May 6, 1863, resulted in a Confederate victory that stopped an attempted flanking movement by Maj. Gen. Joseph "Fighting Joe" Hooke...

The Face of Battle: Americans at War, 9/11 to Now | National Portrait Gallery
04/28/2017
The Face of Battle: Americans at War, 9/11 to Now | National Portrait Gallery

The Face of Battle: Americans at War, 9/11 to Now | National Portrait Gallery

The Face of Battle: Americans at War, 9/11 to Now explores and assesses the human costs of ongoing wars through portraiture. The exhibition title is drawn from John Keegan’s classic military history, which reorients our view of war from questions of strategy and tactics to its personal and individua...

Napoléon's Egyptian Riddle
04/28/2017
Napoléon's Egyptian Riddle

Napoléon's Egyptian Riddle

Though the young French general ultimately failed to wrest Egypt from the Mamluks, he did win the trust and support of his countrymen. Late on the wintry afternoon of Dec. 5, 1797, a 28-year-old Frenchman stepped from a carriage at 6 rue Chantereine in Paris. “At first sight he seemed to me to have…

When Arthur Miller interviewed Ernie Pyle
04/18/2017
Encounter: Ernie Pyle Stumps Arthur Miller

When Arthur Miller interviewed Ernie Pyle

Newspaper reporters are seldom popular. They are the bearers of bad tidings. They ask embarrassing questions and reveal unpleasant facts. They’re frequently pushy and obnoxious. In opinion polls, Ameri­cans rate reporters at the bottom of the esteem spectrum, along with poli­ticians, lobbyists and u...

Timeline photos
04/10/2017

Timeline photos

Today in 1919, Mexican revolutionary Emiliano Zapata is ambushed and shot to dead by Federales in Morelos.

Signals Crossed
04/05/2017
Signals Crossed

Signals Crossed

Communication Failures Cost Forrest and the Rebels Dearly at Tupelo The summer of 1864 was in many ways the Confederacy’s last gasp for survival. Ulysses S. Grant had gone east to take overall command of the Union Army, but he left his…

Navy artists record military history on canvas
03/29/2017
Navy artists record military history on canvas

Navy artists record military history on canvas

Since World War II, sailors with the Naval History and Heritage Command’s Combat Art Program have been deploying with paints and brushes to tactfully record U.S. naval history.

Six Questions | Author Allen Boyer
03/29/2017
Six Questions | Author Allen Boyer

Six Questions | Author Allen Boyer

ALLEN BOYER is a former senior appellate counsel in the enforcement division of the New York Stock Exchange. Rocky Boyer's War: An Unvarnished History of the Air Blitz That Won the War in the Southwest Pacific, to be published this year by Naval Institute Press, is his fifth book. 1. What inspired y...

100 Greatest Generals
03/29/2017
100 Greatest Generals

100 Greatest Generals

A list of history’s 100 best military commanders, from ancient to modern times. We combed through 3,000 years of history to identify “standout” military commanders whose battlefield prowess, impact on the conduct of war in their respective eras, or significant contributions to the development of war...

Profile pictures
03/28/2017

Profile pictures

Our June 2017 issue is now on sale! You won't want to miss this rare account of Longstreet's wounding, places to explore in Pittsburgh, and Part 1 of our look at the Confederate Augusta Arsenal. Get yours at Barnes and Noble, Walmart, and online at our company site: http://bit.ly/1NDBYQr

Photos from Civil War Times Magazine's post
03/22/2017

Photos from Civil War Times Magazine's post

Johnston Comes Out Swinging at Bentonville
03/21/2017
Johnston Comes Out Swinging at Bentonville

Johnston Comes Out Swinging at Bentonville

Outmanned, disorganized and disheartened, the Confederates could do little more than harass Gen. William T. Sherman’s Federals as they swarmed through the Carolinas in February and March of 1865. But as he met with his commanders on March 18 just southwest of Bentonville, N.C., Sherman conceded he w...

Any Fool Can Obey an Order - Modern War Institute
03/17/2017
Any Fool Can Obey an Order - Modern War Institute

Any Fool Can Obey an Order - Modern War Institute

“In war the first principle is to disobey orders. Any fool can obey an order. He ought to have gone on, had he the slightest Nelsonic temperament in him.” So wrote First Sea Lord Jacky Fisher in angry critique of Capt. H.M. Pelly, a cruiser captain under Adm. Beatty at the Battle of Dogger Bank …

Photos from Civil War Times Magazine's post
03/01/2017

Photos from Civil War Times Magazine's post

Sky Above, Mud Below
02/25/2017
Sky Above, Mud Below

Sky Above, Mud Below

Only those who endured the shrieking shells, stagnant water, creeping rats and rotting corpses could truly convey the horrors of World War I trench warfare

Battle Of The Alamo
02/25/2017
Battle Of The Alamo

Battle Of The Alamo

Facts, information and articles about Battle Of The Alamo, an event of Westward Expansion from the Wild West Battle Of The Alamo Facts Dates February 23, 1836 – March 6, 1836 Location San Antonio de Bexar, Texas Republic, now: San Antonio, Texas Generals/Commanders William Travis, Texas James Bowie,...

Joshua Chamberlain at Petersburg
02/23/2017
Joshua Chamberlain at Petersburg

Joshua Chamberlain at Petersburg

The Union colonel’s own clouded hindsight has led to confusion about his 1864 heroics. June 18, 1864 was not a good day for the Army of the Potomac. Lieutenant General Ulysses S. Grant had ordered another series of assaults against the Confederate lines at Petersburg, Va., hoping to capture the city...

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April 1, 2009

Marine One

President Barack Obama’s willingness to keep the current fleet of Marine helicopters assigned to the president because the current Marine One “seems adequate” is in sharp contrast to the approach one of his predecessors took with respect to the presidential helicopter fleet. One morning on returning to Andrews Air Force Base, President Lyndon Johnson was approached by a Marine sergeant on the tarmac who pointed to a particular helicopter and said, “Mr. President, your helicopter is over there.” LBJ draped a large arm over the Marine’s shoulder and replied, “Son, they are all my helicopters.”

The cost overruns for the proposed new helicopter fleet are far too much for the Navy to continue to pursue the project. These helicopters are not Air Force One. While all of the add-ons and bells and whistles may be justifiable to some at the Pentagon, one has to wonder how much should be put into a platform that is essentially used for very short hops.

In the event that the White House needed to become “airborne,” Air Force One is the platform on which that would happen. Not a helicopter.

Roland Nicholson Jr.

Former Army officer

Stockbridge, Mass.
Russia sh#t better worry about China going after future infastruce of world ports to block future U.S. shipping. READ and read some more. SHARE!
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