Armed Forces Journal

Armed Forces Journal Strategy and analysis for military and defense leaders. Founded in 1863. Owned by HistoryNet.
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Military Times
01/29/2018
Military Times

Military Times

The renowned World War II pilot and legendary bad boy lived life on his own terms, as this interview from 1988 proves.

From the June 9, 1864 issue of Army and Navy Journal - estimated costs of a cavalry regiment
01/12/2018

From the June 9, 1864 issue of Army and Navy Journal - estimated costs of a cavalry regiment

Civil War Times Magazine
08/31/2017
Civil War Times Magazine

Civil War Times Magazine

Online Now! Our latest video with Civil War Times Editor Dana Shoaf tells the story of a lone Confederate buried off Route 30 at the Old Log Church in Schellsburg, Pennsylvania. Watch it now and let us know what you think in the comments below!

Civil War Times Magazine
08/02/2017

Civil War Times Magazine

#HumpDayHistory
(Civil War facts to get you through the longest day of the week)

Confederate “Boy Major” killed at Gettysburg…

Confederate Major Joseph W. Latimer (“The Boy Major”) was only 19 years old when a Union shell mangled his right arm during an artillery duel on Benner’s Hill, July 2, 1863, during the Battle of Gettysburg. Union artillery engaged Latimer’s guns from three positions: Culp’s Hill, Steven’s Knoll, and East Cemetery Hill. An exploding shell wounded his arm and killed his horse, which fell on him and pinned him to the ground. Latimer’s arm was amputated, but an ensuing infection took the young soldier’s life on August 1, 1863. According to one of his officers, Latimer, “was most gallant, showing the greatest coolness and bravery under the most trying circumstances.”

Vietnam Magazine
06/13/2017
Vietnam Magazine

Vietnam Magazine

Vietnam magazine recently interviewed Mark Bowden on his upcoming book "Hue 1968: A Turning Point of the American War in Vietnam," and his take on the lasting legacy of that battle.

Civil War Times Magazine
06/07/2017

Civil War Times Magazine

#HumpDayHistory
(Civil War facts to get you through the longest day of the week)

A father’s dying thoughts…

Amos Humiston fought with the 154th New York Volunteer Infantry at the Battle of Gettysburg, where he was killed. While he lay dying, he grasped in his hand a photograph of his two sons and daughter. When his unidentified body was later discovered, his hand still clutched the photo, a glimpse into his dying thoughts and the only clue to his identity. A Philadelphia physician, Dr. John Francis Bourns, who saw the photo at a Gettysburg tavern, and learned of its tragic tale, set out to identify the soldier. He produced hundreds of inexpensive duplicates of the photo as carte-de-visites and appealed to newspapers everywhere to publish the story of the search for these children and the quest to identify their father. The Philadelphia Inquirer carried an account on October 19, 1863, under the headline, ‘Whose Father Was He?’ The column gave a detailed description of the children’s appearance, Dr. Bourns’ address, and a request for newspapers throughout the country to spread the story, which many soon did. A few weeks later, one of those papers made its way to Portville, New York, and into the hands of Mrs. Philinda Humiston, the mother of eight-year-old Franklin, six-year-old Alice, and four-year-old Frederick. She notified Dr. Bourns that several months earlier she had sent her husband a photograph of their three children, just like the one described in the papers, and she had heard nothing from him since the Battle of Gettysburg. In response, the doctor rushed one of the carte-de-visites to her and she confirmed it was the photo of her three children, who were now fatherless, and she a widow. Newspapers broke the story of the identification of the unknown Gettysburg soldier as Amos Humiston on November 19, 1863, the same day President Abraham Lincoln delivered his Gettysburg Address.

06/07/2017
HistoryNet

HistoryNet

Today, marks the 73rd anniversary of D-Day. On June 6, 1944, over 160,000 Allied troops were sent to cross the English Channel onto the beaches of Normany, France. The ensuing operation, Operation Overlord—launched by General Dwight D. Eisenhower—would be the first of many in the fight to liberate Western Europe from Hi**er's grasp. It would also be the largest amphibious operation in history.

The operation was successful, but losses heavy. Hi**er, believing the attack was a distraction, refused to move his troops from northwestern France near the Seine River, where he believed a larger Allied attack was imminent. As a result, Allied attacks on key supply routes and bridges, superior Allied air power, and German troops having to come from too far afield delayed German reinforcements from reaching the beaches in time, sealing a necessary Allied victory. Three months later, northern France would be completely freed from N**i rule as the Allies prepared next for the invasion of Germany.

By the end of the Normandy campaign, Allied casualties totaled near 210,000, with about 37,000 killed in action. On the German side, casualties were staggering with over 200,000 Germans killed and another 200,000 captured. The battle would mark the beginning of the end of the war in Europe.

06/06/2017
HistoryNet

HistoryNet

Today, marks the 73rd anniversary of D-Day. On June 6, 1944, over 160,000 Allied troops were sent to cross the English Channel onto the beaches of Normany, France. The ensuing operation, Operation Overlord—launched by General Dwight D. Eisenhower—would be the first of many in the fight to liberate Western Europe from Hi**er's grasp. It would also be the largest amphibious operation in history.

The operation was successful, but losses heavy. Hi**er, believing the attack was a distraction, refused to move his troops from northwestern France near the Seine River, where he believed a larger Allied attack was imminent. As a result, Allied attacks on key supply routes and bridges, superior Allied air power, and German troops having to come from too far afield delayed German reinforcements from reaching the beaches in time, sealing a necessary Allied victory. Three months later, northern France would be completely freed from N**i rule as the Allies prepared next for the invasion of Germany.

By the end of the Normandy campaign, Allied casualties totaled near 210,000, with about 37,000 killed in action. On the German side, casualties were staggering with over 200,000 Germans killed and another 200,000 captured. The battle would mark the beginning of the end of the war in Europe.

HistoryNet
05/30/2017
HistoryNet

HistoryNet

In a new FILM RECON review, Senior Editor Paraag Shukla takes on Netflix's "War Machine," a missed opportunity to both entertain and help viewers understand the significant complexities of the international mission in Afghanistan.

Military History Magazine
05/01/2017
Military History Magazine

Military History Magazine

Today in 1778, British troops under Major John Graves Simcoe and Lt. Col. Robert Abercromby attack Brig. Gen. John Lacey Jr. and his Patriot militia near Crooked Billet. Although it went down as a British victory, the relatively minor battle served as an object lesson for both sides of that struggle.

To learn more about the battle, click the link below:
http://www.historynet.com/close-call-crooked-billet.htm

The Face of Battle: Americans at War, 9/11 to Now | National Portrait Gallery
04/28/2017
The Face of Battle: Americans at War, 9/11 to Now | National Portrait Gallery

The Face of Battle: Americans at War, 9/11 to Now | National Portrait Gallery

The Face of Battle: Americans at War, 9/11 to Now explores and assesses the human costs of ongoing wars through portraiture. The exhibition title is drawn from John Keegan’s classic military history, which reorients our view of war from questions of strategy and tactics to its personal and individua...

When Arthur Miller interviewed Ernie Pyle
04/18/2017
Military History Magazine

When Arthur Miller interviewed Ernie Pyle

Today in 1945, off Okinawa, the 77th Infantry Division loses a buddy when Ernie Pyle, the GI’s war correspondent, is killed by Japanese machine gun fire.

Pyle was a Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist best known for his accounts of American soldiers in World War II.

Military History Magazine
04/10/2017

Military History Magazine

Today in 1919, Mexican revolutionary Emiliano Zapata is ambushed and shot to dead by Federales in Morelos.

America's Civil War Magazine
04/05/2017
America's Civil War Magazine

America's Civil War Magazine

In our May 2017 issue, on stands now, we explore how communication failures cost Forrest and the Rebels dearly at Tupelo. Read it online now and let us know what you think in the comments below!

Also, be sure to check out our print edition for more information and photos. Get yours at all Barnes & Noble stores, most Walmart and Giant stores, and always online at our company site: http://ow.ly/kPEe30anR8A

Navy artists record military history on canvas
03/29/2017
Navy artists record military history on canvas

Navy artists record military history on canvas

Since World War II, sailors with the Naval History and Heritage Command’s Combat Art Program have been deploying with paints and brushes to tactfully record U.S. naval history.

Military History Quarterly
03/29/2017
Military History Quarterly

Military History Quarterly

Join us for our next installment of MHQ's web-only series "6 Questions." This week features "Rocky Boyer's War" by author Allen Boyer. Based on his father's own unauthorized diary, Boyer traces the American "air blitz" offensive in the Southwest Pacific during World War II.

HistoryNet
03/29/2017
HistoryNet

HistoryNet

We combed through 3,000 years of history to identify “standout” military commanders whose battlefield prowess, impact on the conduct of war in their respective eras, or significant contributions to the development of warfare helped create the world we live in today.

Civil War Times Magazine
03/28/2017

Civil War Times Magazine

Our June 2017 issue is now on sale! You won't want to miss this rare account of Longstreet's wounding, places to explore in Pittsburgh, and Part 1 of our look at the Confederate Augusta Arsenal. Get yours at Barnes and Noble, Walmart, and online at our company site: http://bit.ly/1NDBYQr

03/28/2017
Vietnam Magazine

Vietnam Magazine

"It was a way to finally get back home and to heal." Listen to Vietnam Veteran Doug Bradley on why music was so important for soldiers.

Civil War Times Magazine
03/22/2017

Civil War Times Magazine

#HumpDayHistory
(Civil War facts to get you through the longest day of the week)

Rose O'Neal Greenhow was a Washington, D.C., socialite before the Civil War, with connections to many important political figures, in part due to her marriage to a prominent doctor and lawyer who worked at the State Department. Following his death in 1852, she began to sympathize more with the Southern cause and when the war broke out, began to use those connections as the head of a Confederate spy network that used a 26-symbol cipher for encoding messages. In early July 1861, Greenhow passed secret messages to Confederate General P. G. T. Beauregard containing information regarding Union military movements for what would be the First Battle of Bull Run, including the plans of General Irvin McDowell. Confederate President Jefferson Davis credited Greenhow's information for the Confederate victory at Manassas on July 21. In August, Allen Pinkerton, head of the newly formed Secret Service placed Greenhow under house arrest. While searching her house, Pinkerton and his men found intelligence materials left from evidence she tried to burn, including scraps of coded messages, reports, and maps of Washington fortifications and notes on military movements. The materials included love letters from the abolitionist Republican Senator Henry Wilson from Massachusetts. She considered him her prize source, and said he gave her data on the "number of heavy guns and other artillery in the Washington defenses," information he likely obtained from his work on the Military Affairs Committee. Greenhow was later imprisoned and then sent to the Confederate States. Due to her varied connections, she was reportedly able to continue spying and passing encoded information during her imprisonment.

Military History Quarterly
03/21/2017
Military History Quarterly

Military History Quarterly

From the Spring 2016 issue of MHQ, newly published online . . .

Want to make sure you don't miss any stories like this one? Just have the exquisitely illustrated, premium-quality print edition of MHQ delivered directly to you four times a year. Click on the "Shop Now" button above to subscribe at special savings!

HistoryNet
03/21/2017
HistoryNet

HistoryNet

Today in 1918, Operation Michael, directed at the British in the Somme sector, kicks off the Kaiserschlacht, an all-out German offensive aimed at knocking the British, French and Portuguese armies out of the war before the American Expeditionary Force fully establishes itself on the Western Front.

Military History Magazine
03/21/2017
Military History Magazine

Military History Magazine

Today in 1918, Operation Michael, directed at the British in the Somme sector, kicks off the Kaiserschlacht, an all-out German offensive aimed at knocking the British, French and Portuguese armies out of the war before the American Expeditionary Force fully establishes itself on the Western Front.

America's Civil War Magazine
03/21/2017
America's Civil War Magazine

America's Civil War Magazine

#OnThisDay in 1865, in North Carolina, Union troops under General John Schofield occupy Goldsboro. Read more about the occupation and the Battle of Bentonville at: http://ow.ly/P2JB30a0rEo

Photo: "The Soldier in our Civil War", 1893

Any Fool Can Obey an Order - Modern War Institute
03/17/2017
Any Fool Can Obey an Order - Modern War Institute

Any Fool Can Obey an Order - Modern War Institute

“In war the first principle is to disobey orders. Any fool can obey an order. He ought to have gone on, had he the slightest Nelsonic temperament in him.” So wrote First Sea Lord Jacky Fisher in angry critique of Capt. H.M. Pelly, a cruiser captain under Adm. Beatty at the Battle of Dogger Bank …

Civil War Times Magazine
03/01/2017

Civil War Times Magazine

#HumpDayHistory
(Civil War facts to get you through the longest day of the week)

A little drummer boy…

Robert Hendershot was just a boy when, in 1861, he reportedly became a fixture in the camp of the Jackson County Rifles. He incessantly practiced his drum calls, leading at least one recruit to call him "a perfect little pest." He accompanied the Rifles to Fort Wayne, outside Detroit, where the unit became Company C of the 9th Michigan Infantry. Hendershot claimed to have enlisted along with the others, but said that the mustering officer rejected him because of his youth. He formally enlisted in the 9th in March 1862, when the regiment moved from Kentucky to Murfreesboro, Tenn. He was posted at the Murfreesboro courthouse on July 13 when Confederate Colonel Nathan Bedford Forrest launched a pre-dawn raid on the town. During the battle, the young Hendershot claimed to have fearlessly exposed himself to enemy fire, a claim later substantiated by several 9th Michigan soldiers. Frequent seizures, which he had suffered his whole life, kept him from further duty, but Hendershot continued to hang around the Union encampment, now in Fredericksburg, Va. On December 11, 1862, the 7th Michigan Infantry volunteered to cross the Rappahannock River to drive rebel sharpshooters out. Hendershot claimed he helped push off the first boat and slipped when he tried to climb aboard, and made the voyage across clinging to the gunwale. A dispatch from the scene described "a drummer boy, only 13 years old, who volunteered and went over in the first boat, and returned laden with curiosities picked up while there." Reports of the episode appeared in the press and Hendershot gained notoriety when he identified himself as the drummer boy.

HistoryNet
02/25/2017
HistoryNet

HistoryNet

Sky Above, Mud Below - Only those who endured the shrieking shells, stagnant water, creeping rats and rotting corpses could truly convey the horrors of World War I trench warfare

HistoryNet
02/25/2017
HistoryNet

HistoryNet

REMEMBER THE ALAMO!

Today in 1836, the Siege of the Alamo began with General Antonio Lopez de Santa Anna marching his Mexican troops into San Antonio de Bexar, Texas, and surrounding the Alamo.
The Alamo was defended by a small force of Texans and Tejanos, led by William Barrett Travis and James Bowie and including Davy Crockett. Refusing a chance to surrender, Travis opened fire and sealed their fate.

Photo credit: The Alamo

Civil War Times Magazine
02/23/2017
Civil War Times Magazine

Civil War Times Magazine

In our April issue, we revisit Joshua Chamberlain at Petersburg. Check it out online now and be sure to pick up a print edition for more photos and information. Get yours at all Barnes & Noble stores, most Walmart stores, and always online at our company site: http://bit.ly/1NDBYQr

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You are correct. There was no change. April 1, 2009 Marine One President Barack Obama’s willingness to keep the current fleet of Marine helicopters assigned to the president because the current Marine One “seems adequate” is in sharp contrast to the approach one of his predecessors took with respect to the presidential helicopter fleet. One morning on returning to Andrews Air Force Base, President Lyndon Johnson was approached by a Marine sergeant on the tarmac who pointed to a particular helicopter and said, “Mr. President, your helicopter is over there.” LBJ draped a large arm over the Marine’s shoulder and replied, “Son, they are all my helicopters.” The cost overruns for the proposed new helicopter fleet are far too much for the Navy to continue to pursue the project. These helicopters are not Air Force One. While all of the add-ons and bells and whistles may be justifiable to some at the Pentagon, one has to wonder how much should be put into a platform that is essentially used for very short hops. In the event that the White House needed to become “airborne,” Air Force One is the platform on which that would happen. Not a helicopter. Roland Nicholson Jr. Former Army officer Stockbridge, Mass.
Russia sh#t better worry about China going after future infastruce of world ports to block future U.S. shipping. READ and read some more. SHARE!
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