AGU Oceans

AGU Oceans AGU Oceans highlights research and information related marine sciences, and includes research from JGR-Oceans and topics from AGU's Ocean Sciences Section.
Home to nearly 60,000 scientists from 139 countries, AGU provides a dynamic forum for Earth & Space scientists to advance research and collaborate with colleagues across disciplines. Through top-ranked scientific journals, award-winning books,, scientific meetings and conferences, and other activities, AGU offers opportunities to spark scientific innovation and freely exchange knowledge. AGU Members include scientists, researchers, teachers, students, policy makers, and community leaders.
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Charged with exploring three fourths of the planet, Ocean Sciences a large and inclusive field. The oceans are important for our quality of life, its fisheries and mineral resources, for transport, and its role in the climate system. Some of the exciting research emerging is related to the role of the oceans in the climate system. Researchers are studying the ocean’s involvement in the exchange of heat, water vapor, and momentum; sequestering heat at depth; and exchange and cycling of greenhouse gases and other biogeochemically important compounds. Because of its broad focus—and because the ocean is such a vital part of the Earth system—this page encourages dialogue with scientists, engineers, policy-makers, educators, and others interested in science. The focus of this page is marine-related science, including the study processes in environments ranging from the coast through the open ocean, and they develop and use a wide range of highly technical instrumentation ranging from remote sensors to autonomous devices to ship-related sampling gear. It will include highlighted research and information from the AGU journal JGR-Oceans and information that would interest AGU’s section Ocean Sciences, among others.

Mission: AGU promotes discovery in Earth and space science for the benefit of humanity.

In May, Eos looks at lightning. ⚡⚡ From tornado country to the skies of Jupiter, scientists are in a new age of studying...
04/24/2020
Investigating the Spark - Eos

In May, Eos looks at lightning. ⚡⚡ From tornado country to the skies of Jupiter, scientists are in a new age of studying the “big spark.”

https://eos.org/agu-news/investigating-the-spark

In May, we look at lightning—what it tells us about dangerous weather, how to find it on other planets, and what we might learn if we get all that data in one place.

Podcast:  James Garvin is the Chief Scientist at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center. Dr. Garvin has been at NASA for 35 ...
04/24/2020
Third Pod Presents: Sci & Tell – James Garvin on Earth Day at 50 - Third Pod from the Sun

Podcast: James Garvin is the Chief Scientist at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center. Dr. Garvin has been at NASA for 35 years in a variety of roles and missions, and is well known for his incredible work in NASA’s Mars explorational programs. Listen to James talk about his beginnings in science, the legacy he wishes to leave behind, and what he hopes NASA will accomplish in the future.

https://thirdpodfromthesun.com/2020/04/24/third-pod-presents-sci-tell-james-garvin-on-earth-day-at-50/

James Garvin is the Chief Scientist at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center. Dr. Garvin has been at NASA for 35 years in a variety of roles and missions, and is well known for his incredible work in NASA's Mars explorational programs.

A new report from AGU, the American Academy of Microbiology and the Gulf of Mexico Research Initiative details the role ...
04/21/2020

A new report from AGU, the American Academy of Microbiology and the Gulf of Mexico Research Initiative details the role microbial communities played in the cleanup of the Deepwater Horizon oil spill. The methods, tools and strategies gained by the research can help scientists understand other environmental disturbances, including climate change.
https://www.asmscience.org/content/colloquia.58

On opposite sides of the world, Aji Styawan and Greg Kahn, (winners of Getty Images Climate Visuals grants) captured sto...
04/21/2020
Photography Focuses on Sea Level Rise and Eroding Communities - Eos

On opposite sides of the world, Aji Styawan and Greg Kahn, (winners of Getty Images Climate Visuals grants) captured stories of the impact of rising sea levels in Indonesia and the United States and the resilience with which communities have responded.

https://eos.org/articles/photography-focuses-on-sea-level-rise-and-eroding-communities

Narratives from applicants for the Getty Images Climate Visuals Grants provided a unique insight into the reality of climate change. Both winners focused on the impact of sea level rise.

Research Spotlight: Diatoms contribute the most to the ocean's silicon cycle, but another group of single-celled organis...
04/16/2020
New Recognition for Major Players in the Ocean’s Silicon Cycle - Eos

Research Spotlight: Diatoms contribute the most to the ocean's silicon cycle, but another group of single-celled organisms, Rhizaria, has a more bigger role than we thought.

https://eos.org/research-spotlights/new-recognition-for-major-players-in-the-oceans-silicon-cycle

Tiny, shelled protists known as Rhizaria may be responsible for up to one fifth of the total amount of silica produced by the world’s oceanic organisms.

The decline and eventual disappearance of year-round sea ice in the Arctic will have numerous profound implications. Res...
04/14/2020
An Element of Randomness in Modeling Arctic Ice Cover - Eos

The decline and eventual disappearance of year-round sea ice in the Arctic will have numerous profound implications. Researchers are looking to hone predictions of when the ice will be gone entirely.

https://eos.org/research-spotlights/an-element-of-randomness-in-modeling-arctic-ice-cover

Incorporating random variation of temperature, humidity, and wind offers a computationally cheap alternative to improving resolution in an Earth system model when predicting when Arctic sea ice will disappear.

"The team concluded that it is possible the bed of the Greenland Ice Sheet can stay wet and drain small amounts of water...
04/10/2020
Greenland Ice Sheet Meltwater Can Flow in Winter, Too - GeoSpace

"The team concluded that it is possible the bed of the Greenland Ice Sheet can stay wet and drain small amounts of water year-round. This finding is important for understanding how meltwater from the ice surface moves through the ice sheet, is retained, refreezes and/or ultimately drains into rivers and/or the global ocean." https://blogs.agu.org/geospace/2020/04/09/greenland-ice-sheet-meltwater-can-flow-in-winter-too/

New findings published in Geophysical Research Letters underscore need for year-round investigations of Arctic hydrology.

In Geophysical Research Letters: Ongoing Dispersal of the 7 August 2019 Pumice Raft From the Tonga Arc in the Southweste...
04/06/2020

In Geophysical Research Letters: Ongoing Dispersal of the 7 August 2019 Pumice Raft From the Tonga Arc in the Southwestern Pacific Ocean

https://doi.org/10.1029/2019GL086768

Photo: Smithsonian Institution, National Museum of Natural History

In Global Biogeochemical Cycles: Biogeochemical Connectivity Between Freshwater Ecosystems beneath the West Antarctic Ic...
04/03/2020

In Global Biogeochemical Cycles: Biogeochemical Connectivity Between Freshwater Ecosystems beneath the West Antarctic Ice Sheet and the Sub‐Ice Marine Environment

https://doi.org/10.1029/2019GB006446

Photo: University of Washington

Scientists on the R/V Endeavor had a problem: While they were out at sea, the coronavirus spiraled around the globe into...
04/01/2020
During a Pandemic, Is Oceangoing Research Safe? - Eos

Scientists on the R/V Endeavor had a problem: While they were out at sea, the coronavirus spiraled around the globe into a pandemic. And they’d barely missed the window to fly through Europe back home to the United States.

Read more from Jenessa Duncombe here:
https://eos.org/articles/during-a-pandemic-is-oceangoing-research-safe

With research cruises postponed, scientists are trying to get home safe, and others worry about the fate of their instruments left at sea.

Microbes living in the sand play a role in nutrient and mineral cycling along coasts. As scientists make global estimate...
04/01/2020
Microbial Mechanisms Change with the Seasons - Eos

Microbes living in the sand play a role in nutrient and mineral cycling along coasts. As scientists make global estimates about ocean and especially coastal water changes, they must take into account these tiny microbes and their substantial role.

https://eos.org/research-spotlights/microbial-mechanisms-change-with-the-seasons

Microbes living in the sand on a barrier island alter the way they break down organic matter as their environment changes throughout the year, which has implications for the surrounding water column.

"I started my own countdown (to Earth Day) at the 50-day mark. As an oceanographer, each of my tweets highlight an ocean...
03/30/2020
25 days to Earth Day 2020 - how are you counting down? - GeoEd Trek

"I started my own countdown (to Earth Day) at the 50-day mark. As an oceanographer, each of my tweets highlight an ocean topic, scientist, technology, educational resource, etc. I’ve connected all of mine as one Twitter thread, so by clicking on the first one, you can scroll through all of them on the same page."

https://blogs.agu.org/geoedtrek/2020/03/28/25-days-to-earth-day-2020/

Alas, the massive gatherings and celebrations for the 50th anniversary of Earth Day are pretty much cancelled across the globe. But the countdown started for many of us when it was 50 days to go, and now, with 25 days until Earth Day 2020, I’m sharing where I am seeing some fun posts on Twitter. J...

How do you use science to make a real impact on ecosystems and communities? Lauren Alexander Augustine explains how the ...
03/27/2020
Thirty Years, $500 Million, and a Scientific Mission in the Gulf - Eos

How do you use science to make a real impact on ecosystems and communities? Lauren Alexander Augustine explains how the NASEM Gulf Research Program is investing the massive Deepwater Horizon criminal settlements toward an ambitious mission.

https://eos.org/opinions/thirty-years-500-million-and-a-scientific-mission-in-the-gulf

Gulf Research Program executive director Lauren Alexander Augustine discusses the impact science can have on communities when given money and time.

Research Spotlight: Iron is the most abundant metal in Earth’s crust, and its presence in different forms in rocks can t...
03/27/2020
Review of Go-To Iron Analysis Method Reveals Its Pros and Cons - Eos

Research Spotlight: Iron is the most abundant metal in Earth’s crust, and its presence in different forms in rocks can tell vivid stories about ancient environmental conditions on the planet.

https://eos.org/research-spotlights/review-of-go-to-iron-analysis-method-reveals-its-pros-and-cons

Researchers validated some steps in the standard sequential chemical technique used to extract different forms of iron from rock samples but found inconsistencies in other steps.

In Florida, what’s past is prologue. Our latest Living in Geologic Time column takes you from shallow sea to 27th state ...
03/27/2020
Lost in the Everglades - Eos

In Florida, what’s past is prologue. Our latest Living in Geologic Time column takes you from shallow sea to 27th state to sea level rise.

https://eos.org/features/lost-in-the-everglades

Living in Geologic Time: An unintentional adventure in the River of Grass shows how Florida has changed dramatically over 15,000 years of human habitation.

Research Spotlight: Intermediate-depth waters formed in the Irminger Sea, to the southeast of Greenland, may play a larg...
03/24/2020
Larger Role for Shallow Intermediate Waters in Ocean Circulation - Eos

Research Spotlight: Intermediate-depth waters formed in the Irminger Sea, to the southeast of Greenland, may play a larger role in ocean circulation than previously thought.

https://eos.org/research-spotlights/larger-role-for-shallow-intermediate-waters-in-ocean-circulation

Water masses formed off southeastern Greenland may contribute more than previously thought to the variability of the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation, which strongly influences global climate.

"Webster, a sea-ice specialist at the University of Alaska Fairbanks Geophysical Institute, will in a few days board fli...
03/24/2020
Heading farther north than she has ever been - The Field

"Webster, a sea-ice specialist at the University of Alaska Fairbanks Geophysical Institute, will in a few days board flights that will carry her across the globe to Svalbard. From there, she will carry her bag upon a 35-passenger aircraft. She will then fly more than 500 miles northward before landing on an ice runway and riding a snowmachine to the research vessel Polarstern, an icebreaker that has been twirling in the sea ice of the Arctic Ocean since last October."

https://blogs.agu.org/thefield/2020/03/18/heading-farther-north-than-she-has-ever-been/

On the cusp of Interior Alaska’s springtime, Melinda Webster will not experience it this year. She’ll miss most of summer, too. Webster will soon head north of Earth’s land masses, to spend the next half year cradled in ice.

We’ve put together an Online Learning Exchange for AGU members and educators to share ideas for creating online educatio...
03/18/2020
Online Learning Exchange from AGU Members & Educational Community

We’ve put together an Online Learning Exchange for AGU members and educators to share ideas for creating online educational experiences for students in the field, lab or classroom.
https://www.agu.org/learn-and-develop/learn/online-learning-exchange/online-learning-exchange-main-page

As earth and space scientists change teaching practices to accommodate social distancing during the pandemic COVID-19 / Coronavirus outbreak, we wanted to share tips and tricks for creating a better online educational experience for K-20+ students in the field, lab or classroom.

We could all really use a good field trip right now. Here are some you can take online. https://blogs.agu.org/thefield/2...
03/18/2020
It's a great time to take a virtual field trip - The Field

We could all really use a good field trip right now. Here are some you can take online.

https://blogs.agu.org/thefield/2020/03/17/it-might-be-best-time-in-human-history-to-take-a-virtual-field-trip/

Spring field trips are canceled, which makes it really hard to get students charged up about Earth sciences. Here's a selection of virtual field trips that can't replace the real thing, but may help students not lose interest, and may even whet their appetites for the day we can venture out again, f...

Still one of the most dramatic tsunami videos we've ever seen. Nine years ago this week. https://blogs.agu.org/trembling...
03/13/2020
Another heart-stopping tsunami video from Japan - The Trembling Earth

Still one of the most dramatic tsunami videos we've ever seen. Nine years ago this week.

https://blogs.agu.org/tremblingearth/2013/08/13/another-heart-stopping-tsunami-video-from-japan/

A “new” video has emerged of the Tohoku tsunami racing inland in a Japanese port town. I don’t know that it’s never been released before, but I sure haven’t seen it, and I’ve seen basically all of them. The video is embedded at the end of this post. Update 8/19/13: I have changed the vid...

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Comments

So now we are at the point of dumping the Fukushima waste water into the Pacific Ocean. Somehow I knew it would come to this. The collective temperament of Human Kind would lead us to make mistakes this big. That our greed and arrogance of intellect would bring us to this point. The nations responsible for pursuing this technology have bowed out and left Japan alone to deal with this technological and economically overwhelming challenge. “It’s OK” we will be told, “it will not raise the background radiation levels of the Pacific Ocean measurably.” The whole idea of trying to isolate a nuclear pile from water inflow with ice just begs reconsideration from anyone thinking above an 8th grade science level. But that’s what was attempted. I suggest we not give up yet because the result of washing our hands of this mess is the equivalent of washing this disaster into the Pacific Ocean. Pump a polymerizing slurry around and under the containment and start over; or whatever it takes to isolate this mess from intruding ground water. But don’t give up and just dump this mess into the sea.