Journal of American Deafness and Rehabilitation Association-JADARA

Journal of American Deafness and Rehabilitation Association-JADARA JADARA is a widely read publication which deals with research findings (pragmatic applications), program descriptions and articles on deafness.

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"Reasonable Accommodation For Workers Who Are Deaf: Differences in ADA knowledge Between Supervisors And Advocates" by H...
04/20/2020
Reasonable Accommodation For Workers Who Are Deaf: Differences in ADA knowledge Between Supervisors And Advocates

"Reasonable Accommodation For Workers Who Are Deaf: Differences in ADA knowledge Between Supervisors And Advocates" by Hayley Stokar.

https://repository.wcsu.edu/jadara/vol53/iss2/2

Abstract: Despite the existence of the Americans with Disabilities Act (1990), workers who are deaf still struggle with reasonable accommodations in the workplace. The challenges relate, in part, to knowledge and training deficits among hearing supervisors. In order to understand the difference between supervisor knowledge and advocate knowledge around reasonable accommodation, focus groups were conducted with two populations: (1) supervisors in retail and food service who were all hearing, and (2) advocates engaged in training and education around deaf accommodation needs, who were either deaf or hearing. Findings identify similarities and disparities between the groups, highlighting that, while specific legal knowledge of reasonable accommodation may be low among supervisors, willingness to accommodate creatively and learn adaptive strategies is high among both supervisors and advocates. Working relationships that simultaneously foster familiarity with hearing loss and general collegiality contribute to understanding of reasonable accommodation. These insights may serve as guidance for the development of training tools and expand knowledge about deafness in the workplace.

Despite the existence of the Americans with Disabilities Act (1990), workers who are deaf still struggle with reasonable accommodations in the workplace. The challenges relate, in part, to knowledge and training deficits among hearing supervisors. In order to understand the difference between superv...

"Teaming Together to Care for Our Deaf Patients: Insights from the Deaf Health Clinic" by Kate Panzer, Junghyun Park, Le...
04/20/2020
Teaming Together to Care for Our Deaf Patients: Insights from the Deaf Health Clinic

"Teaming Together to Care for Our Deaf Patients: Insights from the Deaf Health Clinic" by Kate Panzer, Junghyun Park, Leslie Pertz, and Michael M. McKee.

https://repository.wcsu.edu/jadara/vol53/iss2/3

Abstract: Deaf patients often struggle with accessing culturally competent care. Poor communication and inaccessible health information negatively impact Deaf individuals, resulting in poorer health outcomes and inappropriate health care use. To address this problem, the Family Medicine Department established the Deaf Health Clinic in 2015 through the efforts of healthcare providers fluent in American Sign Language. After that, the clinic faced several management issues, and implemented strategies to address them. The paper discusses lessons learned and suggests potential and tested solutions to reduce gaps in health care for Deaf individuals.

Deaf patients often struggle with accessing culturally competent care. Poor communication and inaccessible health information negatively impact Deaf individuals, resulting in poorer health outcomes and inappropriate health care use. To address this problem, the Family Medicine Department established...

"Understanding Deaf and Hard of Hearing College Student Experiences of School Social Work Services in the K-12 Education...
04/20/2020
Understanding Deaf and Hard of Hearing College Student Experiences of School Social Work Services in the K-12 Education System

"Understanding Deaf and Hard of Hearing College Student Experiences of School Social Work Services in the K-12 Education System" by Kota Takayama.

https://repository.wcsu.edu/jadara/vol53/iss2/4

Abstract: This article focuses on Deaf and Hard of Hearing college students’ experiences with school social work services. This study surveyed 136 Deaf and hard of hearing college students about their experiences with school social work services, their concerns about social workers’ competencies, and service delivery. The results of the study imply that school-based social work services should be culturally relevant and school social workers culturally competent. Furthermore, the results indicated that respondents ranked services they felt most comfortable asking about and which aspects of service delivery they felt were most important.

This article focuses on Deaf and Hard of Hearing college students’ experiences with school social work services. This study surveyed 136 Deaf and hard of hearing college students about their experiences with school social work services, their concerns about social workers’ competencies, and serv...

"From Isolation to Communication: Connecting Adults Who Have Hearing Loss With Their Communication Partners" by Stephen ...
04/20/2020
From Isolation to Communication: Connecting Adults Who Have Hearing Loss With Their Communication Partners

"From Isolation to Communication: Connecting Adults Who Have Hearing Loss With Their Communication Partners" by Stephen D. Roberts and Nancy A. Delich.

https://repository.wcsu.edu/jadara/vol53/iss2/5

Abstract: As Baby Boomers enter the late adulthood stage of life, hearing loss continues to be one of the most prevalent, chronic, and isolating conditions facing older adults today. Research has focused on the negative consequences of hearing loss on the health and the person’s well-being, but it is equally important to recognize that hearing loss also leads to communication loss. The resulting social isolation and the collateral effects of hearing loss on the communication partner are the focus of this mixed-method study that explored the hearing loss-related quality of life for both parties. Five overarching themes emerged from the analysis, presenting salient features of the hearing loss-related quality of life for both participants. Moreover, self-reported assessments revealed that communication partners significantly underrated their spouses’ social/situational effects of hearing loss compared to their spouses’ ratings. The findings showed how the participants’ quality of life had been shaped by the challenges of communication as exacerbated by hearing loss. The participants remarked that the interview process served to increase their awareness of needed communication strategies to reduce social, emotional, psychological, and communication isolation, and improve quality of life for both parties.

As Baby Boomers enter the late adulthood stage of life, hearing loss continues to be one of the most prevalent, chronic, and isolating conditions facing older adults today. Research has focused on the negative consequences of hearing loss on the health and the person’s well-being, but it is equall...

"An Interprofessional Collaborative Approach to the Development of a Content Valid Interview Questionnaire for Persons w...
10/30/2019
An Interprofessional Collaborative Approach to the Development of a Content Valid Interview Questionnaire for Persons with Hearing Loss and Their Communication Partners

"An Interprofessional Collaborative Approach to the Development of a Content Valid Interview Questionnaire for Persons with Hearing Loss and Their Communication Partners" by Nancy A. Delich and Stephen D. Roberts.

https://repository.wcsu.edu/jadara/vol53/iss1/2/

Abstract: An assessment instrument needs to be valid in order for data to be accurately interpreted and applied. Currently, few rigorous content evaluations have been conducted on hearing-related questionnaires. This study describes a multiphase approach for obtaining content validity evidence in the development of a questionnaire that explores quality of life for persons with hearing loss and their communication partners. A panel of 15 interprofessional experts evaluated 41 questionnaire items for content relevance and content clarity. Findings revealed an overall scale of .99 for content relevance and .85 for content clarity, indicating high content validity for the revised 40-item questionnaire.

An assessment instrument needs to be valid in order for data to be accurately interpreted and applied. Currently, few rigorous content evaluations have been conducted on hearing-related questionnaires. This study describes a multiphase approach for obtaining content validity evidence in the developm...

"Deaf Adult Consumers of Public Behavioral Health Services in Maryland: January 1, 2016 – January 1, 2018" by Teresa Cro...
10/30/2019
Deaf Adult Consumers of Public Behavioral Health Services in Maryland: January 1, 2016 – January 1, 2018

"Deaf Adult Consumers of Public Behavioral Health Services in Maryland: January 1, 2016 – January 1, 2018" by Teresa Crowe.

https://repository.wcsu.edu/jadara/vol53/iss1/3/

Abstract: This exploratory study describes the demographic profiles of 7,474 deaf adults who are consumers of public behavioral health services in the state of Maryland. Up until recent years, data about deaf consumers were unavailable to researchers. Over the past two years, additional items were added to the Outcome Measurement Systems interview, such as “primary language” and boxes where providers could record “deaf.” The data presented in this paper are for deaf adults who received services from January 1, 2016 to January 1, 2018. The results of this study indicate that: 1) most deaf consumers lived in private residences, 2) consumers felt somewhat confident in their recovery goals, 3) they had moderate difficulty dealing with psychiatric symptoms, 4) almost half were diagnosed with mood disorders, 5) nearly a quarter were diagnosed with substance use disorders, of which three-quarters were addicted to opioids, 6) 13.2% were diagnosed with anxiety disorders, 8) 17.5% were employed, 9) six percent had been arrested or incarcerated, and 10) over half smoked cigarettes and 85% of those smoked one to 20 cigarettes per day. Deaf adults were significantly more likely to be diagnosed with intellectual disabilities, developmental disorders, and behavioral disorders with onset in childhood or adolescents. They were significantly less likely to be diagnosed with disorders associated with substance use, schizophrenia spectrum disorder, and mood disorders. The discussion includes comparisons with hearing counterparts, strengths and limitations of the design, and implications for future practice, research, and policy-making.

This exploratory study describes the demographic profiles of 7,474 deaf adults who are consumers of public behavioral health services in the state of Maryland. Up until recent years, data about deaf consumers were unavailable to researchers. Over the past two years, additional items were added to th...

JADARA congratulates Noëlle Opsahl and Lawrence H. Pick for winning the 2019 McCay Vernon Outstanding JADARA Article Awa...
06/18/2019

JADARA congratulates Noëlle Opsahl and Lawrence H. Pick for winning the 2019 McCay Vernon Outstanding JADARA Article Award on June 3, 2019, in Baltimore, Maryland! This award is given to a published JADARA author(s) upon the recommendation of the journal editorial board. Pictured: Co-author Noëlle Opsahl (left) and Lawrence H. Pick (right).

"Transfer of Learning from Collegiate Deaf and Hard of Hearing Graduates to their Employment Outcome: An Exploratory Stu...
04/08/2019
Transfer of Learning from Collegiate Deaf and Hard of Hearing Graduates to their Employment Outcome: An Exploratory Study

"Transfer of Learning from Collegiate Deaf and Hard of Hearing Graduates to their Employment Outcome: An Exploratory Study" by Mark J. Myers and Kota Takayama.

https://repository.wcsu.edu/jadara/vol52/iss3/1/

Abstract: This exploratory study of learning transfer from collegiate education to employment outcomes investigated the work experiences among deaf and hard of hearing adult college graduates. The significance of the study was incorporated in a quantitative method design targeting 19 of 64 participants in a single employment outcome. The participants received the highest ratings in teamwork and communication skills. Although gender was not originally a factor in this study, an independent test uncovered that female and male participants had significant differences in the transfer of learning competencies in the areas of communication and teamwork. A recommendation for the future is to focus on short-term near transfer as primary research on the outcome of learning transfer from classroom to internship settings.

This exploratory study of learning transfer from collegiate education to employment outcomes investigated the work experiences among deaf and hard of hearing adult college graduates. The significance of the study was incorporated in a quantitative method design targeting 19 of 64 participants in a s...

"Understanding the Language Experiences and Motivations of Deaf Adolescent Latino Struggling Readers" by Melissa Herzig....
04/08/2019
Understanding the Language Experiences and Motivations of Deaf Adolescent Latino Struggling Readers

"Understanding the Language Experiences and Motivations of Deaf Adolescent Latino Struggling Readers" by Melissa Herzig.

https://repository.wcsu.edu/jadara/vol52/iss3/2/

Abstract: Current American methods for educating Deaf adolescent Latino struggling readers need to change in order to maximize learning opportunities. This begins with identifying student strengths and building on them to help students gain new and productive skills. It is imperative to understand Deaf students’ socio-cultural backgrounds, interests, needs, and values through ethnographic research in order to identify what motivates these Latino Deaf adolescents to read. This information could guide teachers and specialists in redesigning and tailoring instruction for these students.

Current American methods for educating Deaf adolescent Latino struggling readers need to change in order to maximize learning opportunities. This begins with identifying student strengths and building on them to help students gain new and productive skills. It is imperative to understand Deaf studen...

"A Brief Report: Interpersonal Violence Exposure and Violence Myth Acceptance in the Ohio Deaf Community" by Stefanie J....
01/07/2019
A Brief Report: Interpersonal Violence Exposure and Violence Myth Acceptance in the Ohio Deaf Community

"A Brief Report: Interpersonal Violence Exposure and Violence Myth Acceptance in the Ohio Deaf Community" by Stefanie J. Day, Kelsey A. Cappetta, and Melissa L. Anderson.

https://repository.wcsu.edu/jadara/vol52/iss2/1

Abstract:

Interpersonal violence is a leading cause of death and pervasive public health issue in the US. Although some research suggests that Deaf people experience disparities in interpersonal violence exposure compared to the general population, most prior research has been conducted using written English survey measures or in areas where exceptionally high levels of educational attainment failed to mirror the characteristics of the Deaf community at large. To address these limitations, the current secondary analysis leveraged data collected via an American Sign Language survey instrument to compare rates of interpersonal violence exposure and violence myth acceptance between Deaf (n = 75) and hearing (n = 111) samples extracted from the Ohio general population. Contrary to prior literature, rates of violence exposure were largely similar across Deaf and hearing samples. Yet, Deaf participants more likely to endorse myths about relationship and sexual violence compared to hearing participants. In other words, Deaf participants were more likely to blame themselves and other Deaf victims for their experiences of victimization, rather than shift the blame to the perpetrator of those violence. Combined with the low level of access to domestic violence and sexual violence workshops reported by the Deaf sample, current results call for increased psychoeducation efforts that specifically target members of the Deaf community. Similar to the approaches used in this study, we specifically recommend the application of community-engaged methodologies through which Deaf survivors of interpersonal violence guide the development and implementation of psychoeducational efforts for their peers. Additional implications and limitations are discussed.

Interpersonal violence is a leading cause of death and pervasive public health issue in the US. Although some research suggests that Deaf people experience disparities in interpersonal violence exposure compared to the general population, most prior research has been conducted using written English....

"Characteristics, Services, and Outcomes of Vocational Rehabilitation Consumers who are Deaf-Blind" by Jennifer L. Cmar ...
01/07/2019
Characteristics, Services, and Outcomes of Vocational Rehabilitation Consumers who are Deaf-Blind

"Characteristics, Services, and Outcomes of Vocational Rehabilitation Consumers who are Deaf-Blind" by Jennifer L. Cmar and Michele C. McDonnall.

https://repository.wcsu.edu/jadara/vol52/iss2/2

Abstract:

Limited research has been conducted regarding the characteristics, services, and outcomes of consumers served by Vocational Rehabilitation (VR) agencies in the United States who are deaf-blind. This article provides descriptive information about this population based on Rehabilitation Services Administration Case Service Report (RSA-911) data from fiscal years 2013, 2014, and 2015. The article also includes a discussion of inconsistencies in use of disability category codes to classify VR consumers who are deaf-blind, emphasizing the need for agencies to utilize a consistent classification system that reflects the diverse characteristics of this population.

Limited research has been conducted regarding the characteristics, services, and outcomes of consumers served by Vocational Rehabilitation (VR) agencies in the United States who are deaf-blind. This article provides descriptive information about this population based on Rehabilitation Services Admin...

"Prevalence of Alcohol Use: A National Survey of Deaf Adults in the United States" by Poorna Kushalnagar, TraciAnn Hogli...
01/07/2019
Prevalence of Alcohol Use: A National Survey of Deaf Adults in the United States

"Prevalence of Alcohol Use: A National Survey of Deaf Adults in the United States" by Poorna Kushalnagar, TraciAnn Hoglind, Abbi N. Simons, and Deborah Guthmann.

https://repository.wcsu.edu/jadara/vol52/iss2/3

Abstract:

Alcohol is one of the most commonly used substances in the United States. Alcohol consumption has been linked to several sociodemographic and social characteristics in the general population. Research is needed to understand the prevalence of and characteristics related to alcohol use in Deaf adults. Our study purpose was to determine nation-wide prevalence of alcohol use and investigate characteristics related to alcohol consumption in Deaf adults in the United States.

Objective: Alcohol is one of the most commonly used substances in the United States. Alcohol consumption has been linked to several sociodemographic and social characteristics in the general population. Research is needed to understand the prevalence of and characteristics related to alcohol use in....

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Call for Nominations: Larry G. Stewart Award APA Division 22, Special Interest Group on Deafness https://youtu.be/-95w8R8N81M The Special Interest Group on Deafness (SIGD) of Division 22 of the American Psychological Association is calling for nominations for the Larry G. Stewart Award. This award is presented to an individual who exemplifies these ideals, values, and expertise of Dr. Stewart. This year, nominations will be accepted by filling out this Google form: https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLScGxcaSReD5ykdG1Um5XSnEWpgDoux_8mZbQiRuQkPfSHFY3g/viewform?usp=sf_link. For more information, contact Dr. Lori Day at [email protected]. All nominations are due by May 22nd, 2020.