Pushing The Limit Lessons

Pushing The Limit Lessons Pushing The Limit refers to my style of teaching and training. Setting lofty goals, committing a schedule and building a partnership is how I coach.

Lessons focused on the most fun part of playing, performance! The goal is to push all your boundaries which makes for a well rounded musician. This includes discovering history, tech, artists, genres, theory, technique, soloing, composition, performance, recording, and the ability to teach others from their experiences. Bio:David “Dbass” Holder
Family is a big part of my musical foundation in gosp

Lessons focused on the most fun part of playing, performance! The goal is to push all your boundaries which makes for a well rounded musician. This includes discovering history, tech, artists, genres, theory, technique, soloing, composition, performance, recording, and the ability to teach others from their experiences. Bio:David “Dbass” Holder
Family is a big part of my musical foundation in gosp

Operating as usual

07/21/2019

From last Sunday, having fun with #dayjob creating a new lane for #expression #pushingthelimit #onehanded #electricbass #studio #recording #funvibes #chillvibes

07/16/2019

Wow that's how you do a tutorial! We learn by rhote and repetition. If you can make a song with the information, you will memorize it easier!

07/13/2019

Legendary bassist @richardbonaofficial because singing and playing is a great way to becoming one with your instrument

Put your passion first!
07/11/2019

Put your passion first!

Masterful words from a master!
07/11/2019

Masterful words from a master!

Lol #repost ways to be #grateful #support #reliable #hopeful #positive #bodylove
07/10/2019

Lol #repost ways to be #grateful #support #reliable #hopeful #positive #bodylove

Lol sometimes it's like that... @dbassny is getting a new bass....who else is getting a new ax?
07/10/2019

Lol sometimes it's like that... @dbassny is getting a new bass....who else is getting a new ax?

Pushing The Limit Lessons
02/21/2019

Pushing The Limit Lessons

04/05/2017

We listen and learn then we do and redo if we are smart we record these moments because they tell us more about ourselves than we could ever put into more meaningful words or vibrations.

08/19/2015

Science Suggests Bassists Are Far More Important Than Most People Realize

When Led Zeppelin's bassist John Paul Jones was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 1995, he made a classic bass joke. "Thank you to my friends for finally remembering my phone number," he said, looking over at the rest of the band.
Like any good joke, there's some truth to it: Bassists are criminally overlooked and underappreciated members of most every band. Yet there's scientific proof that bassists are actually one of the most vital members of any band. There are powerful neurological and structural reasons why our music needs bass. It's time we started treating bassists with the respect they deserve.
Source: Tumblr
Holding it down. Last year, researchers from McMaster University in Hamilton, Canada, found that there's a reason why bass lines tend to fill out the background of a song, leaving the theatrics to higher-pitched instruments. Our brains are far better suited to establishing a song's rhythmic feel if they occur in lower tones.
Laurel Trainor, the study's lead author, hooked up participants to an EEG to monitor brain activity while they heard simultaneous streams of two piano notes — one high-pitched, the other low-pitched. Every so often researchers played one of the notes fractions of a second too early. Participants were far better at recognizing these errors if they occurred in the bass notes. That same study also found that, if asked to tap their fingers along to this unpredictable stream of notes, subjects were much better at adjusting their tapping when the lower tones began to arrive early than they were if the same thing happened with the higher tones.
This shows just how influential a bass is in setting the whole rhythmic feel of a song. If we didn't have some stoic individual holding down the low end, we all might be very lost in the music.
Source: Mic /YouTube
Harmonic importance. Bassists also have an important role in establishing the harmonic and melodic direction of music. As Robert Challoner wrote in his 1880 History of the Science and Art of Music: "The bass part ... is, in fact, the foundation upon which the melody rests and without which there could be no melody."
The bass often defines the chords that set a song's melody in context. The bass note doesn't always define the chord's root, but it frequently commands that role. Sting, one of the world's most celebrated and richest bassists, absolutely relishes the harmonic control of the bass.
"You know, the piano player can play a C chord on the piano, but it's only a C chord if I play C on the bass. If I play something else, it's a totally different chord. For instance, an A," Sting told Singing Bassist. "So you control the harmony. If you are also a singer, you control the top – yes, I'm a control freak! So everybody performs within your parameters. So, as a bandleader, it's a very good position to be in."
Source: Tim Mosenfelder/Getty Images
The sound of power. Other research out of Northwestern University has found that bass-heavy music is far more effective at inspiring feelings of power and drive in listeners. To discover that, they had participants listen to pieces of music with altered bass levels.
"We chose to manipulate bass levels in music because existing literature suggests that bass sound and voice are associated with dominance," Dennis Hsu, one of the study's authors, told Science Daily. Sure enough, those that listened to music with heavy bass reported more feelings of power. Participants also chose more power-related words on a word completion test aiming to assess implicit, or unconscious, feelings of power.
Source: Tumblr
In defense of the bass: Bass may often fit into the background of our music, but it's absolutely fundamental to the shape and structure of our favorite songs. And it doesn't preclude songwriting either: Several of the greatest songwriters of all time were primarily bassists — Paul McCartney, Roger Waters of Pink Floyd and Charles Mingus.
Thundercat, an extraordinarily influential hip-hop bassist and a vital contributor to Kendrick Lamar's To Pimp a Butterfly, said it best: "I decided to take it as far as it could go and to use my skill as a tool. You don't have to just hit nails with hammers, you know; you can use a hammer to beat somebody's brains in, to make armor or break a car window," he told Interview. "You can do all kinds of things with your instrument outside of its surface purpose."
Bass is, as always, so much more than it appears. It deserves its credit.

08/18/2015

"Music is the universal language of man kind" Henry Wadsworth Longfellow

Profile pictures
08/13/2015

Profile pictures

08/13/2015

Follow me on Instagram @PushingTheLimitLessons and Twitter @PTL_Lessons

Pushing The Limit Lessons
08/13/2015

Pushing The Limit Lessons

back to the lessons and now we can do them over the internet...
07/28/2015
Pushing The Limit Lessons

back to the lessons and now we can do them over the internet...

Pushing The Limit refers to my style of teaching and training. Setting lofty goals, committing a schedule and building a partnership is how I coach.

07/28/2015

Science Suggests Bassists Are Far More Important Than Most People Realize
Tom Barnes's avatar image By Tom Barnes June 04, 2015 LIKE MIC ON FACEBOOK:
When Led Zeppelin's bassist John Paul Jones was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 1995, he made a classic bass joke. "Thank you to my friends for finally remembering my phone number," he said, looking over at the rest of the band.
Like any good joke, there's some truth to it: Bassists are criminally overlooked and underappreciated members of most every band. Yet there's scientific proof that bassists are actually one of the most vital members of any band. There are powerful neurological and structural reasons why our music needs bass. It's time we started treating bassists with the respect they deserve.
Source: Tumblr
Holding it down. Last year, researchers from McMaster University in Hamilton, Canada, found that there's a reason why bass lines tend to fill out the background of a song, leaving the theatrics to higher-pitched instruments. Our brains are far better suited to establishing a song's rhythmic feel if they occur in lower tones.
Laurel Trainor, the study's lead author, hooked up participants to an EEG to monitor brain activity while they heard simultaneous streams of two piano notes — one high-pitched, the other low-pitched. Every so often researchers played one of the notes fractions of a second too early. Participants were far better at recognizing these errors if they occurred in the bass notes. That same study also found that, if asked to tap their fingers along to this unpredictable stream of notes, subjects were much better at adjusting their tapping when the lower tones began to arrive early than they were if the same thing happened with the higher tones.
This shows just how influential a bass is in setting the whole rhythmic feel of a song. If we didn't have some stoic individual holding down the low end, we all might be very lost in the music.
Source: Mic /YouTube
Harmonic importance. Bassists also have an important role in establishing the harmonic and melodic direction of music. As Robert Challoner wrote in his 1880 History of the Science and Art of Music: "The bass part ... is, in fact, the foundation upon which the melody rests and without which there could be no melody."
The bass often defines the chords that set a song's melody in context. The bass note doesn't always define the chord's root, but it frequently commands that role. Sting, one of the world's most celebrated and richest bassists, absolutely relishes the harmonic control of the bass.
"You know, the piano player can play a C chord on the piano, but it's only a C chord if I play C on the bass. If I play something else, it's a totally different chord. For instance, an A," Sting told Singing Bassist. "So you control the harmony. If you are also a singer, you control the top – yes, I'm a control freak! So everybody performs within your parameters. So, as a bandleader, it's a very good position to be in."
Source: Tim Mosenfelder/Getty Images
The sound of power. Other research out of Northwestern University has found that bass-heavy music is far more effective at inspiring feelings of power and drive in listeners. To discover that, they had participants listen to pieces of music with altered bass levels.
"We chose to manipulate bass levels in music because existing literature suggests that bass sound and voice are associated with dominance," Dennis Hsu, one of the study's authors, told Science Daily. Sure enough, those that listened to music with heavy bass reported more feelings of power. Participants also chose more power-related words on a word completion test aiming to assess implicit, or unconscious, feelings of power.
Source: Tumblr
In defense of the bass: Bass may often fit into the background of our music, but it's absolutely fundamental to the shape and structure of our favorite songs. And it doesn't preclude songwriting either: Several of the greatest songwriters of all time were primarily bassists — Paul McCartney, Roger Waters of Pink Floyd and Charles Mingus.
Thundercat, an extraordinarily influential hip-hop bassist and a vital contributor to Kendrick Lamar's To Pimp a Butterfly, said it best: "I decided to take it as far as it could go and to use my skill as a tool. You don't have to just hit nails with hammers, you know; you can use a hammer to beat somebody's brains in, to make armor or break a car window," he told Interview. "You can do all kinds of things with your instrument outside of its surface purpose."
Bass is, as always, so much more than it appears. It deserves its credit.

Mya once told me "Get it how you live" my understanding is get what you need with what you got cause you have it in you!
03/28/2015
Mya Vat Fan Page

Mya once told me "Get it how you live" my understanding is get what you need with what you got cause you have it in you!

FREE AWKWARD REBEL

Pushing The Limit Lessons
02/06/2015

Pushing The Limit Lessons

01/22/2015

Just added a new piano student to the PTL clientele. Welcome Ben! Excited to work with this already accomplished musician and DJ.

Pushing The Limit Lessons
01/20/2015

Pushing The Limit Lessons

Pushing The Limit Lessons
01/03/2015

Pushing The Limit Lessons

10/23/2013

If you have any questions on music theory (chords, scales, chord analysis, etc) I would love to help you all out for free!! : )

09/02/2013

prepairing to be back up and running...

04/12/2013

Life is crazy! That is all...

Her first guitar lesson! She was so excited.
03/25/2013

Her first guitar lesson! She was so excited.

#MusicHomework #lessons #startedatthebottom
03/20/2013

#MusicHomework #lessons #startedatthebottom

Music notation 101 notes, rests & cleffs!
03/08/2013

Music notation 101 notes, rests & cleffs!

02/27/2013

I wanna try online lessons through YouTube, Google Hangout or Skype and then people can pay through pay pal. What do you all think?

02/27/2013

Lessons?!?

A must read Craigslist post that makes me laugh.
02/13/2013

A must read Craigslist post that makes me laugh.

11/10/2012

Does anyone have a song they need help learning?

11/02/2012

Today I'd like to talk about intervals... They measure the distance between any two notes and are used to build chords & scales. The smallest interval recognized in western harmony is the half step (ex E up to F or B up to C). All intervals are made of combinations of half steps and whole steps (whole step ex E up to F# or B up to C#). The intervalic name for half step is Minor 2nd and whole step's name is Major 2nd.

Here are some examples of the different intervals and how many steps they are in the keys of C, A & F Major.
Ex #1 - C up to E is called a Major 3rd = 2 steps (step = whole step)
Ex #2 - C down to E is called a Minor 6th = 4 steps
Ex #3 - A up to D is called a Perfect 4th = 2 1/2 steps
Ex #4 - A down to D is called a Perfect 5th = 3 1/2 steps
Ex #5 - F up to G is called a Major 2nd = 1 step
Ex #6 - F down to G is called a Dominant 7th = 5 steps

How do these intervals build scales?
All major scales are built starting with the root or key note, then adding either W = whole step or H = half step.
Root + w + w + h + w + w + w + h C D E F G A B C
A B C# D E F# G# A
F G A Bb C D E F

Address


General information

Bass/ Piano/ Guitar/ Drums/ Vocals & Theory LEVELS: Beginner to Experienced AGES: 7 & UP RATES: $25/30min, $50/1hr, $80 (save $25) or $150 (save $50) Please give 48hrs notice when rescheduling.

Opening Hours

Tuesday 10am - 1pm
7pm - 9pm
Wednesday 10am - 1pm
7pm - 9pm
Thursday 10am - 1pm
7pm - 9pm
Friday 10am - 1pm
7pm - 9pm

Telephone

(631) 392-8297

Alerts

Be the first to know and let us send you an email when Pushing The Limit Lessons posts news and promotions. Your email address will not be used for any other purpose, and you can unsubscribe at any time.

Contact The Business

Send a message to Pushing The Limit Lessons:

Videos

Nearby media companies