Great Lakes Review

Great Lakes Review Publishing fiction and poetry from and about the Great Lakes region of the US and Canada.

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This page is one of those bookmark-able resources you can return to again and again for revision ideas. https://bit.ly/3...
09/04/2020
Teaching Revision: Even More Revision Prompts « pleiadesmag

This page is one of those bookmark-able resources you can return to again and again for revision ideas. https://bit.ly/3jum1nZ

Teaching Revision: Even More Revision Prompts –Flickr/Enokson More revision prompts to add to https://pleiadesmag.com/teaching-revision-all-of-the-revision-prompts-so-far/ – I’m teaching revision again, this time for a senior thesis workshop, in which students are workshopping novels, plays, T...

Announcing Great Lakes Review issue 9! Featuring...Fiction from RS Deeren, Rachel Houghton, Paul Luikart, Chad Lutz, Car...
09/01/2020

Announcing Great Lakes Review issue 9! Featuring...

Fiction from RS Deeren, Rachel Houghton, Paul Luikart, Chad Lutz, Carolyn Oliver, Garrett Stack, Ralph Uttaro and Herb Zarov

Poetry from Lisa Baird, Ronna Blume, Andrea Bossi, S. K. Brownell, Angelica Esquivel, Kisha Nicole Foster, Jessica Franken, Cal Freeman, Anna Leahy, D. A. Lockart, Brandon McCarthy, John S. O'Connor, John Palen, Kenneth Pobo, MK Sturdevant, and Kerry Trautman

Photography from Emily Szymanski, Alice Becker, Jerome Berglund, Sarah Brown, Gillian DiPofi, Paul Harwood, Kip Knott, Susan Sarver, George Stein and David Straange

Grab your copy today: https://amzn.to/32FZKfY

"I had felt that I was writing myself into existence. I had been trying to capture each moment, each passing emotion."
08/31/2020
Reconstructing the Self Through Memoir, After Psychosis

"I had felt that I was writing myself into existence. I had been trying to capture each moment, each passing emotion."

The early pages are fragments, cramped lines—“I am alive,” “Breakfast time – 8:00”—and half-dashed phrases: “words and symbols are powerful,” “perception =/= reality.” It’s a plain gray journal, fa…

Have you ever used one of Submittable's writing prompts? They're organized around interesting themes and give you lots o...
08/30/2020

Have you ever used one of Submittable's writing prompts? They're organized around interesting themes and give you lots of jumping-off points.

Check them out: https://bit.ly/3lknI99

Coming soon: Issue 9!
08/29/2020

Coming soon: Issue 9!

Mary Annette Pember writes about her grandmother, Cecelia Rabideaux: one of the founders of the country’s first Indian L...
08/29/2020
Perspective: Grandma Cele, the unknown Ojibwe suffragette

Mary Annette Pember writes about her grandmother, Cecelia Rabideaux: one of the founders of the country’s first Indian League of Women Voters in 1924.

Although only recently acknowledged by writers of mainstream history, Native women such as the Haudenosaunee inspired Matilda Joslyn Gage, Elizabeth Cady Stanton and Lucretia Mott.

In praise of the bold, outspoken and frequently overlooked Native women who fought for the vote UPDATED: Cecelia Rabideaux's great niece, Lynn Bigboy of the Bad River reservation is the current president-elect of the League of Women Voters of Ashland and Bayfield Counties

08/28/2020

Seeking recommendations! What book/collection can be read in one weekend?

After global protests broke out in response to the murder of George Floyd by a Minneapolis police officer, Michael Thomp...
08/27/2020
Inside a Michigan prison, an elaborate meal to honor George Floyd and Black Lives Matter

After global protests broke out in response to the murder of George Floyd by a Minneapolis police officer, Michael Thompson wanted to host a special meal to honor Floyd’s life. But as an inmate at the Muskegon Correctional Facility in Michigan, it wasn't easy to pull off.

“I was very moved by some of the comments that the guys were making about how special this occasion was, which was about commemorating the life of George Floyd, who through his sacrifice made the world stand up and say. ENOUGH IS ENOUGH,” one participant wrote as part of a group of reflections on the dinner. “I want everyone to know that we too feel the pain and anguish that so many Black men has endured. This was our way of paying tribute to George Floyd and all of the rest of those that gave their lives unnecessarily.”

They only had a single microwave to make a meal for 50 people. Attendees will remember the feast for the rest of their lives.

Great Lakes Review contributor Joseph Harris will publish his debut collection of short stories on September 15! "You're...
08/26/2020
Exit…Stage Left

Great Lakes Review contributor Joseph Harris will publish his debut collection of short stories on September 15! "You're In The Wrong Place" (Wayne State University Press) is an interconnected narrative of 12 stories set in the suburbs of Detroit.

One of the stories, "Exit…Stage Left" was first published in Great Lakes Review back in December 2017. Check out that story here: https://bit.ly/2YENGKC

And the collection here: https://www.indiebound.org/book/9780814348086

My Uncle Mark was the black sheep on my Mom’s side. He moved to Windsor during Vietnam, saying, “Good luck with that bullsh*t war – I wanna live.” When he got back he hustled the pool sharks at some east…

Meet photography editor Jacob Wood! Jacob joined the Great Lakes Review team back in February. He curated some stunning ...
08/25/2020

Meet photography editor Jacob Wood! Jacob joined the Great Lakes Review team back in February. He curated some stunning regional landscape photography for our next print issue, which is coming soon.

Check out our Q&A with Jacob: https://bit.ly/2YoN9wp

At first, The Journal of the American Medical Association got about 20 or 30 poems each week, mostly from doctors and nu...
08/23/2020
What Poetry Means for Doctors and Patients During a Pandemic

At first, The Journal of the American Medical Association got about 20 or 30 poems each week, mostly from doctors and nurses. But as the pandemic got underway, more and more poems arrived.

"We’re hardwired to hear the kinds of rhythms that are present in poetry and the ways in which the rhythms of our bodies are expressed in meter, in the music of poetry," explains Rafael Camp, the journal's poetry editor. "I think especially now, when we’re feeling in some ways estranged from our own bodies and disconnected, having that visceral experience of hearing the music and language is just compelling."

The poetry editor of The Journal of the American Medical Association talks about medicine, metaphor, and how literature can even improve patient outcomes.

"I guess in the end it’s just that I want everyone else to delight in the unexplained, the unexpected, and the unapologe...
08/21/2020
In Praise of the Dream-Logic of Speculative Fiction

"I guess in the end it’s just that I want everyone else to delight in the unexplained, the unexpected, and the unapologetically strange—how they can be so much more than the same story told again. I don’t want to see the rabbit come out of the hat."

When I was writing Blue Ticket, at various points I thought about the works that had shown me what speculative fiction was really capable of, beyond idea and into language, into feeling and beyond.…

Linguists and anthropologists who traditionally have focused on more formal languages are paying increased attention to ...
08/15/2020
The fragile state of contact languages

Linguists and anthropologists who traditionally have focused on more formal languages are paying increased attention to "contact languages." These are spoken by groups who create an impromptu language that can be used by speakers of two languages.

These linguistic mash-ups are at high risk of extinction. The race to save them is a matter of time, with more at stake than words.

"Overt racism hasn’t gone away, but it has lost favor, so covert forms have emerged to replace it. The courtesies that t...
08/14/2020
Letter From St. Paul: On the Complex Flavors of Black Joy

"Overt racism hasn’t gone away, but it has lost favor, so covert forms have emerged to replace it. The courtesies that the majority extended George Floyd were strategic. They started to disintegrate the day he was buried."

Ay, just cashed a check And I’m ‘bout to blow it all on chocolate Yeah, I’m ‘bout to blow it all on chocolate Sweet tooth, baby, make that dollar stretch… –Big Boi, “Chocolate” (feat. Troze) During…

These library watercolors will soothe your anxious soul.
08/11/2020
These library watercolors will soothe your anxious soul.

These library watercolors will soothe your anxious soul.

To celebrate the New York Public Library turning 125(!), the Hudson Park branch asked New York City-based artist Nick Golebiewski to paint the libraries of lower Manhattan. (My personal favorite? T…

08/07/2020

What are you reading this weekend?

Art created by inmates has largely gone unseen in the American art scene. Nicole R. Fleetwood's "Marking Time: Art in th...
08/07/2020
Incarcerated Artists Are Making Some of Today’s Most Important Art. A Powerful New Book Explains Why.

Art created by inmates has largely gone unseen in the American art scene. Nicole R. Fleetwood's "Marking Time: Art in the Age of Mass Incarceration" aims to introduce us to this important body of work.

"It’s a very different sense of how to foster an art community than what often happens in more monetized, established art circles," she explains. "Part of why it took so long was the logistics of getting access to certain things, especially people in more restrictive prisons. Many artists had their materials or their art confiscated, or they made art for a nonprofit and community service group while in prison and now have no idea where that art is circulated."

Read a discussion about Nicole R. Fleetwood’s new book about the subject.

08/04/2020

We're still looking for micros, flash, short stories, and poems for our website!

If your work connects to the Great Lakes region or you're from this area, we hope you'll submit: https://bit.ly/2Dyyebq

As always, NO submission fees.

"Finding authentic rural representation in fiction (seeing farmers on the page) meant the world to me, and gave me permi...
08/02/2020
Rural Stories That Get it Right: A Reading List

"Finding authentic rural representation in fiction (seeing farmers on the page) meant the world to me, and gave me permission to write my stories from home."

Living out in the country has a rawness to it, but rural people don’t know it any other way. As Thomas Hardy wrote in Tess of the d’Urbervilles, the milk from the country dairies was too strong for…

We want you on our team! Great Lakes Review is looking for non-fiction editors who can help us shape the non-fiction sec...
08/01/2020

We want you on our team! Great Lakes Review is looking for non-fiction editors who can help us shape the non-fiction section of our website and print journal. If you'd like to learn and contribute with us, apply here: https://bit.ly/38KcLYC

If you OR your poetry/short fiction has a connection to the Great Lakes region, send it our way! We're reading for the w...
07/28/2020

If you OR your poetry/short fiction has a connection to the Great Lakes region, send it our way! We're reading for the website through mid-August and can't wait to see your:

• Poetry
• Micro or flash fiction
• Short stories (up to 2K words)

Submit today: https://bit.ly/2ZloDx3

"What’s so remarkable about [Tyree] Guyton’s effort is that he’s constructed a frame around the present moment. The coll...
07/26/2020
On Immolation

"What’s so remarkable about [Tyree] Guyton’s effort is that he’s constructed a frame around the present moment. The collapse he draws our eye to is not a myth or a dream of the future, it’s now."

The Heidelberg installation has the vibe of Plato’s lost city of Atlantis, the mythic civilization that sank into the ocean overnight after its people lost their sense of virtue.

07/23/2020

What are you reading this week?

When the economy collapsed in 1929, American jobs disappeared at the rate of 20,000 a day.That used to impress people be...
07/21/2020
How Did Artists Survive the First Great Depression?

When the economy collapsed in 1929, American jobs disappeared at the rate of 20,000 a day.

That used to impress people before this pandemic.

This year the questions come up again with a vengeance: What is the role of artists in a crisis? Writers ask, what does my work mean in this larger emergency? Does my personal creativity matter in …

We're reading for the Great Lakes Review website! Send us your best poetry, micros, flash, and short stories up to 2,000...
07/19/2020

We're reading for the Great Lakes Review website! Send us your best poetry, micros, flash, and short stories up to 2,000 words: https://bit.ly/2Dp2Gob

"In weeks four and five, the class contemplated mutiny. 'These bags are dumb,' they said. 'Stop looking away,' I suggest...
07/17/2020
How Photographing a Dumb Paper Bag Led to Writing a Novel

"In weeks four and five, the class contemplated mutiny. 'These bags are dumb,' they said. 'Stop looking away,' I suggested.

Four years and innumerable drafts into my book, I felt the same way."

Everything I needed to know about writing and editing a novel I learned by photographing a dumb brown bag. I teach photography and I also write but I don’t separate the two disciplines. Photograph…

In third or first person, the reader can identify with the reader at their own leisure, guided by the rhythms of the nar...
07/14/2020
So You Want to Write in the Second Person - Electric Literature

In third or first person, the reader can identify with the reader at their own leisure, guided by the rhythms of the narration itself.

But second person is confrontational. And the author must overcome the reader’s response to this forced identification with the story's "you."

Welcome to Read Like a Writer, a series that examines a different element of the craft of fiction writing in each installment, using examples from the Recommended Reading archives. Each month, the editors of Recommended Reading—Halimah Marcus, Brandon Taylor, and Erin Bartnett—will select a ...

Environmental writing is a crucible for the literary fusion of art and science. This blog post rounds up five novels tha...
07/12/2020
When Scientific Data Shapes Climate Literature

Environmental writing is a crucible for the literary fusion of art and science. This blog post rounds up five novels that tangle experience and emotion with environmental information.

For decades now, adventurous artists and scientists have found common ground where their respective forms of curiosity and exploration can merge. Numerous artistic-scientific endeavors (Leonardo, f…

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Whitmore Lake, MI
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About Great Lakes Review

Great Lakes Review publishes fiction and poetry from and about the Great Lakes region of the United States and Canada, both in print annually and on a rolling basis digitally. We celebrate the diversity of experiences within the region and wish to publish work that truly showcases every nuance, nook, cranny, and person who either calls the Great Lakes home or who has been impacted by the region.

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We're very happy to announce that John McNally has selected HOW TO WALK ON WATER AND OTHER STORIES, by Rachel Swearingen of Chicago, Illinois, to receive the 2018 New American Fiction Prize! Rachel will receive $1,000 and the collection will be published in 2020. Deadline for the the 2019 New American Fiction Prize, to be judged by Judith Claire Mitchell, is June 15.