National Security Law Journal

National Security Law Journal The National Security Law Journal (NSLJ), published by George Mason University School of Law, features original scholarly articles in the exciting, evolving field of national security law.

The National Security Law Journal (NSLJ) is a student-edited law journal at the Antonin Scalia Law School at George Mason University in Arlington, Virginia. Our journal features original scholarly articles in the exciting, evolving field of national security law, including legal issues related to diplomacy, intelligence, and the military. Connect with us: www.facebook.com/NatlSecLJ www.twitter.com/NatlSecLJ www.youtube.com/NatlSecLJ

Look for NSLJ at this evenings National Security Institute Open House! Our members are happy to chat about membership, o...
04/08/2019

Look for NSLJ at this evenings National Security Institute Open House! Our members are happy to chat about membership, our upcoming publications, and all things national security!

Today is the day! Come meet the members of NSLJ and hear what we are all about.Come to one of our information sessions a...
04/04/2019

Today is the day! Come meet the members of NSLJ and hear what we are all about.

Come to one of our information sessions at 12 pm in room 224 or 8 pm in Room 221. Food and refreshments will be served!

02/17/2019

The National Security Law Journal is excited to announce our 2019-2020 Board of Editors!

Editor-in-Chief: Corey Pray
Executive Editor: Matt Kren
Managing Editor - Publication: Haley Cook
Managing Editor - Administration: Frank Canavan
Articles Selection Editor: Patrick Withrow
Senior Articles Editor: Jameson Broggi
Senior Research Editor: Dylan Campbell
Associate Research Editor: Daniel Fronk
Senior Notes Editor: Erin McCullough

Congratulations to everyone!

07/31/2018

The National Security Law Journal is excited to announce we have accepted ten new Candidate Members for this upcoming year! We are looking forward to working with you this upcoming year!

- Jonathan Lee
-​ ​Jameson Broggi
- Corey Pray
- Matthew Kren
- Dylan Campbell
- Daniel Cole Fronk
- Patrick Withrow
- Frank Canavan
- Erin McCullough
- Haley Cook

Congratulations!!

07/01/2018

NSLJ is currently accepting Publish-On Submissions from 2Ls, 2Es, 3Ls, and 3Es!
Still want to be on a Journal? Interested in being considered for publication? It’s not too late!

The National Security Law Journal (NSLJ) is the only law journal at Scalia Law to offer a unique publish-on option as an alternative path to journal membership. Students who are extended membership offers through the publish-on process join NSLJ as full Editorial Board Members.

Publish-on submissions are currently being accepted on a rolling basis through the summer. If you have already written a seminar paper on a national security law topic, we will happily accept it! If not, just contact us to discuss your options. Your publish-on application should additionally include your resume and optional statement of interest (max. 250 words).

Please direct any questions you may have to Caelyn Palmer, Editor-in-Chief, at [email protected], or to Jessica Alvarado, Managing Editor, at [email protected].

11/14/2017

Retweeted Schar School (@ScharSchool):

1 out of every 10 students at #GeorgeMason University is a #veteran, a current military service member, or the dependent of one. Learn more about the ERPi Patriot Scholarship spearheaded by alumnus Chris Jones, and apply by 12/1 for spring consideration https://t.co/wMmOOr5CX2 https://t.co/Dr4pgZzrN6

11/13/2017

Please stay tuned for a summary for today's discussion, which will be published in a future issue of our journal!

11/13/2017

Thank you to everyone who joined us for our panel discussion and participated in our Q&A!

11/13/2017

Audience question: Do targeted sanctions have a chilling effect?

11/13/2017

Retweeted MasonNSI (@MasonNatSec):

Happening now: @NatlSecLJ panelists discuss the new era of targeted sanctions with NSI founder @jamil_n_jaffer. https://t.co/IpcO7Gxj89

Smith: OFAC is concerned, but these alternative currencies are still not substitutes of the U.S. dollars because these s...
11/13/2017
Natl Sec Law Journal on Twitter

Smith: OFAC is concerned, but these alternative currencies are still not substitutes of the U.S. dollars because these systems need to at least go through the cell phone networks. https://t.co/T986FhWYkR

“Audience question: is OFAC worried about bitcoins?”

11/13/2017

Audience question: is OFAC worried about bitcoins?

Koblentz: one designated entity that has multiple names can result in difficulty in targeted sanctions.Smith: Russians h...
11/13/2017
Natl Sec Law Journal on Twitter

Koblentz: one designated entity that has multiple names can result in difficulty in targeted sanctions.

Smith: Russians have many of these examples and OFAC had to change the rule on these sanctions. https://t.co/sqOMyOncKq

“Audience questions: how far do these sanctions have to reach around the unique individuals?”

Smith: it depends on the situation. Some sanctions go against family members, such as those who are sanctioned due to na...
11/13/2017
Natl Sec Law Journal on Twitter

Smith: it depends on the situation. Some sanctions go against family members, such as those who are sanctioned due to narcotics. The Russian sanctions have not gone against the family members. https://t.co/sqOMyOncKq

“Audience questions: how far do these sanctions have to reach around the unique individuals?”

Smith: it depends on the situation. Some sanctions go against family members, such as those who are sanctioned due to na...
11/13/2017
Natl Sec Law Journal on Twitter

Smith: it depends on the situation. Some sanctions go against family members, such as those who are sanctioned due to narcotics. The Russian sanctions have not gone against the family members. https://t.co/sqOMyOncKq

“Audience questions: how far do these sanctions have to reach around the unique individuals?”

11/13/2017

Audience questions: how far do these sanctions have to reach around the unique individuals?

Smith: these targeted countries are restructuring their economics so that the targeted individuals will not touch U.S. d...
11/13/2017
Natl Sec Law Journal on Twitter

Smith: these targeted countries are restructuring their economics so that the targeted individuals will not touch U.S. dollars. However, as of now, there is no substitute for the U.S. dollars. U.S. sanctions can impact a country's GDP. https://t.co/ceag1SPJYL

“Audience question: will sanctions impact the value of U.S. dollars? Are these sanctions really cost free?”

11/13/2017

Audience question: will sanctions impact the value of U.S. dollars? Are these sanctions really cost free?

11/13/2017

Katz, on Cuban sanctions: Its regime has not changed since the 1950s. They can do anything but blame it on the U.S. sanctions. Sanctions are not usually productive, yet we persist to continue the business of our domestic politics.

11/13/2017

Koblentz: Russia has vetoes many times for UN sanctions to be imposed on Syria for chemical weapons attacks. As a result, we have to use our own sanctions system and some European countries have joined as partners.

11/13/2017

Viski: many have been delisted by bringing their case to the European Court of Justice because EU members do not trust each other with classified information and do not present evidence in front of the court, which result in these targets being delisted.

11/13/2017

Viski, on how to get off the UN sanctions list: there was not a clear procedure in the beginning, but now there is a clear procedure on how to be delisted.

11/13/2017

Katz: whether we are being strategic on who we sanction in Russia, the people in Russia will assume that we are.

11/13/2017

Smith: it is very difficult to get off the list of being sanction targets; one can actually be sanctioned for solely classified information.

11/13/2017

Smith: Purpose of these sanctions are not punitive but for a behavioral change.

11/13/2017

Up to 6,000 individuals are economically sanctions and 15% of them are from Colombia. Well over half of these are narcotics-inspired sanctions and these are fairly effective.

11/13/2017

Viski: the UN charter passes sanction resolutions and all members have to enforce it. Country based sanctions, such as ones imposed by the U.S., can go further than the UN charter sanctions.

11/13/2017

Katz: targeted sanctions against certain Russian individuals who are close to Putin and not others may be a way to cause conflict among the rank and sets up antagonism within the regime.

11/13/2017

Targeted sanctions against Russia may not have huge impact on the Russians, but we do know that the Russians do not like them. Most interactions with the Russians include them calling for the sanctions to be lifted.

11/13/2017

Katz on Russia/Putin's sanction: Russians argue that these targeted sanctions are not effective and that they never will. We didn't put these sanctions on them thinking that we would change Russian policy, but for domestic policies.

11/13/2017

Why are sanctions used more at the end of the last administration? Smith: Because they were actually working. The "them or us" sanctions against Iran were effective.

11/13/2017

If a target does not need the U.S. clearing system, the impact of the U.S. sanctions is limited.

11/13/2017

Smith: we are talking about sanctions imposed on targeted individuals. If you are a target for a U.S. sanction, you will not be able to interact with U.S. dollars.

11/13/2017

Sanctions are imposed after a lengthy process. An imposed sanction means that we have evidence that the targets are committing war crimes.

11/13/2017

The Syrian targeted sanctions have not been as effective as we want. Dr. Koblentz: sanctions should never be the only tool we use, as these are not the tools to change a government.

11/13/2017

Koblentz on Syria targeted sanctions: sanctions become the easy option to make us feel like we are doing something. They are the beginning of the process, not the end.

11/13/2017

The use of targeted sanctions are relatively recent, which exists for about 20 years. Before that, complete sanctions exist. Targeted sanctions can prevent more humanitarian repercussions.

11/13/2017

Dr. Viski, on what are targeted sanctions: the UN charter defines sanctions as interruptions on foreign relations and trade relations. Sources usually self-define "targeted sanctions," which can include a variety of different policies.

11/13/2017

Topic for our discussion today: Securities in the New Era of Targeted Sanctions.

11/13/2017

Our panelists today: Dr. Andrea Viski, Dr. Gregory Koblentz, Mr. Mark Katz, and Mr. Adam Smith, with Mr. Jamil Jaffer as our moderator.

11/13/2017

Our fall symposium is happening in about an hour! If you can’t join us in person, please follow this feed for live tweets during the event!

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