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Harvard Medical Student Review The Harvard Medical Student Review (HMSR) is a student-run medical journal publishing scholarly arti

Primary Care Selection and the Financial Burdens of Medical Education"Preventative medicine and primary care services ar...
01/11/2022

Primary Care Selection and the Financial Burdens of Medical Education

"Preventative medicine and primary care services are the foundations to building healthier communities. Unfortunately, the resources are often limited, and it is estimated that by 2032, the United States could face a shortage of up to 21,000 to 55,200 primary care physicians [1]. This number may be even larger as the impact of the Covid-19 pandemic has yet to be seen. This deficit of physicians is even more pronounced in rural areas where residents are almost five times as likely to live in a county with a physician shortage [2]. There are a multitude of factors that contribute to this decline in workforce, but one pressing issue is the impact of medical student specialty selection. According to AAMC, specialty content and personality fit are always ranked as top reasons for specialty selection, while debt ranks much lower [4]. Despite this, numerous medical schools have begun to offer full tuition or scholarships in the hope that a debt free education will encourage more students to select primary care. In this commentary, we discuss the Geisinger Abigail Scholars Program which is a program offering free medical education and a living stipend in exchange for a commitment to Geisinger employment in primary care fields upon residency completion. One of the scholars offers her unique perspective as to why she selected this program and how this initiative can reinvigorate primary care interest, while serving as a model for other medical schools."

Christin Spatz, MD [1], Kara Romanowski [1], Tanja Adonizio, MD [1], and Michelle Schmude, EdD [1]
1- Geisinger Commonwealth School of Medicine

Please check out the full article at http://bitly.ws/w35C
Link in bio!

Integrating a Smoking Cessation Initiative for the Uninsured at a Student-Run Free Clinic"Cigarette smoking is the leadi...
16/10/2022

Integrating a Smoking Cessation Initiative for the Uninsured at a Student-Run Free Clinic

"Cigarette smoking is the leading cause of preventable deaths and diseases in the United States. Student-run clinics play an invaluable role in connecting underserved patients with preventative care. To reduce smoking in uninsured communities, the University of Missouri student-run free MedZou Community Health Clinic developed a Smoking Cessation initiative as part of a preventative health service in 2013. Patients utilizing the smoking cessation services receive a combination of motivational interviewing, patient education, and pharmacotherapy. There is currently limited literature on the structure and implementation of student-run preventative health clinics. The smoking cessation initiative described here can provide an example for other student-run clinics to successfully implement similar programs."

Cynthia Y Tang, BS [1]*, Lauren E. Flowers, BS [1]*, Emra Bosnjak, BS [1] , Tricia Haynes, MS [1] , Jamie B. Smith, MA [2] , Laura E. Morris, MD, MSPH [2]

[1] School of Medicine, University of Missouri
[2] Family and Community Medicine, University of Missouri
*These authors contributed equally to this study

Please check out the full article at http://bitly.ws/vqYy

Link in bio!

Completing the Results of a Pan-Canadian Survey on the State of Oncology Education in Family Practice Residency Programs...
15/10/2022

Completing the Results of a Pan-Canadian Survey on the State of Oncology Education in Family Practice Residency Programs: Comparison of One Province to the Rest of Canada

"Introduction: The incidence and prevalence of cancer in Canada is rising, and family physicians will increasingly provide care at all stages of a patient’s cancer journey. This highlights the importance of adequate oncology education in family practice training programs. A survey study done in 2017 to assess the state of oncology education in Canadian family practice residency programs did not include the University of British Columbia (UBC). The purpose of our study was to obtain this data for the UBC family practice residency program and to compare the results to those from the rest of Canada.
Methods: A web-based survey was emailed to UBC family practice residents and program directors. The survey assessed depth of the oncology curriculum, current teaching methods and perceived gaps. Results were compared to the non-UBC survey data and interpreted with descriptive statistics.
Results: 54/348 UBC family practice residents and 10/20 program directors completed the survey. 3% of UBC and 7% of non-UBC family practice residents felt their program adequately prepared them to care for oncology patients. There was uniformity among all participants in ratings of perceived importance of a list of oncology topics expected to be covered in training for residents. There was discordance in the perceived frequency of topics taught between all family practice residents and program directors.
Conclusion: This study can inform further development of oncology specific curriculum in family practice residency programs. Further study is required to understand areas of discordance between family practice residents and program directors."

Alanna Janz [1], Lisa Wang [2], Svetlana Bortnik [2] , Jaspreet Garcha [2], Vincent Tam [3], Steven Yip [3], Paris Ann Ingledew [4]

[1] Faculty of Medicine MD program, University of British Columbia
[2] Family Medicine Residency Program, University of British Columbia Surrey-South Fraser
[3] Tom Baker Cancer Centre; Department of Oncology, Cu***ng School of Medicine, University of Calgary
[4] Department of Surgery, Division of Radiation Oncology, Vancouver Cancer Center, BC Cancer Agency

Please check out the full article at http://bitly.ws/vqLy

Link in bio!

A Look at South Korean Plastic Surgery"With increasing globalization in communication, travel, economics, and innovation...
13/10/2022

A Look at South Korean Plastic Surgery

"With increasing globalization in communication, travel, economics, and innovation, medicine and plastic surgery have also made great advancements. The following essay looks at plastic surgery in South Korea, and the innovations South Korean plastic surgeons have made in the field. We explore the cultural, societal, and economic influences that may have impacted the development and popularity of plastic surgery in South Korea, and the rise of South Korean medical tourism. We also compare South Korean plastic surgery versus American plastic surgery, showing differences and similarities in procedures performed, costs, and in patient demographics. Additionally, we look at the possible impacts of plastic surgery on mental health. Finally, we conclude with a discussion that highlights the importance and incredible potential of cross-cultural communication and collaboration for the prospective advancements that we, in America, could learn, adopt, and create."

Annie Jin and Ian Whittall
University of Connecticut School of Medicine

Please check out the full article at http://bitly.ws/vjkZ

Link in bio!

Vibration-based Microphones as a Solution for Non-invasive Ventilation Related Communication Impairment"The incidence of...
08/10/2022

Vibration-based Microphones as a Solution for Non-invasive Ventilation Related Communication Impairment

"The incidence of acute respiratory failure (ARF) has dramatically increased in the past few decades in the United States. From 2002 to 2017, there was a 197% increase in the annual incidence of ARF, and in response, a 437% increase in the use of noninvasive mechanical ventilation (NIV). Multiple studies have demonstrated that use of NIV frequently causes communication impairment (CI), which is strongly associated with anxiety and can in turn contribute to NIV intolerance and failure, and ultimately, mortality [8-10]. CI also prevents accurate evaluation of patients by providers, which can contribute to worse clinical outcomes [11]. Recently, Lee et al at Pohang University, South Korea, published their development of a flexible, wearable vibration sensor that can amplify speech while minimizing ambient noise. Although this device is intended for use in portable devices such as cell phones, it also poses as a viable solution for NIV-related communication impairment. Use of this vibration-based microphone can help address NIV-related CI and significantly improve clinical outcomes in patients with acute respiratory failure."

James Lee
Carle Illinois College of Medicine

Please check out the full article at http://bitly.ws/vaXn

Link in bio!

About Time: Making Space in the Classroom for Students’ Experiences of Trauma"Many medical students have experienced tra...
07/10/2022

About Time: Making Space in the Classroom for Students’ Experiences of Trauma

"Many medical students have experienced trauma and conditions affecting their mental health. Throughout medical school, especially during psychiatry portions of the curriculum, students and educators may face challenges navigating course material. Adverse classroom and patient interactions can lead to further traumatization, isolation from course content, and lapses in professionalism. Contemporary educational environments have become increasingly sensitive to the prevalence of trauma among students, but debate remains over how to simultaneously respect student needs and ensure engagement with important course content. In medical education, a major challenge is to create learning environments that are attentive to students’ well-being, while preparing students to encounter clinical scenarios they may find distressing. Principles of trauma-informed medical education (TIME) support medical educators and medical students to work together to create curricula and learning environments that are psychologically safe and appropriately challenging. As students engage with difficult course content at a suitable pace with support, they build resilience, embrace growth and learning, and become better able to manage challenging clinical scenarios as future physicians."

Christine Xu [1], David A. Hirsh, MD [2], Jennifer C. Kesselheim, MD [3]

[1] medical student at Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA.
[2] Associate Professor of Medicine, Harvard Medical School/Cambridge Health Alliance, Boston and Cambridge, Massachusetts.
[3] Director of the Master of Medical Sciences (MMSc) in Medical Education program at Harvard Medical School, the Director of the Fellowship in Pediatric Hematology-Oncology at Dana-Farber/Boston Children’s Cancer and Blood Disorders Center, and an Associate Professor of Pediatrics at Harvard Medical School.

Please check out the full article at http://bitly.ws/v2T5

Link in bio!

Medical Student Perspective on Resident Maternity Leave Policy"Since 2017, women have comprised the majority of enrolled...
07/10/2022

Medical Student Perspective on Resident Maternity Leave Policy

"Since 2017, women have comprised the majority of enrolled U.S. medical students, marking a milestone in the gradual diversification of America’s next generation of physicians [1]. We represent six of these female medical students from schools across California. As members of the American College of Physicians California Council of Student Members Women in Medicine Committee, we aim to identify and address unique challenges female physicians and trainees face in the career of medicine while advocating for their equity in well-being, compensation, and career advancements."

May M. Kyaw [1], Angela Pham [1], Gaia Linfield [2], Zoe Burger [2], Sara Toulouie [3], and Olivia Yang [4]

[1] David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA
[2] University of California, San Francisco School of Medicine
[3] California Northstate University College of Medicine
[4] California University of Science and Medicine, School of Medicine

Please check out the full article at http://bitly.ws/v2B2

Link in bio!

Colorectal Cancer Screening During COVID-19: FIT testing as the Suggested Solution"In March 2020, healthcare in the Unit...
06/10/2022

Colorectal Cancer Screening During COVID-19: FIT testing as the Suggested Solution

"In March 2020, healthcare in the United States changed, with primary care and preventative care, particularly colorectal cancer screening, grinding to a halt. COVID-19 brought to the forefront the racial healthcare disparities in the United States with the pandemic disproportionately affecting minority communities, reflecting the well-established disparities in colorectal cancer outcomes which are expected to be exacerbated by the lack of screening. This article aims to promote the use of FIT testing for colorectal cancer screening during this pandemic particularly for minority communities. Studies have shown that FIT tests have a high sensitivity and specificity, are inexpensive, and have better adherence than colonoscopies. Given the cancellation of many screening colonoscopies and the potential risk of leaving the house for a procedure, implementation of a FIT screening program appears to be the best intervention for maintaining colorectal cancer screening during COVID-19 and preventing the cancer disparities from worsening."

Aleeza J. Leder Macek, B.Sc.
New York University Grossman School of Medicine

Please check out the full article at bitly.ws/v2Aj

HMSR Issue 7 is online now! Link in bio.
04/10/2022

HMSR Issue 7 is online now! Link in bio.

Advancing Preclinical Medical Education through High Fidelity Simulation and Standardized Patient Families"Our results s...
05/05/2022

Advancing Preclinical Medical Education through High Fidelity Simulation and Standardized Patient Families

"Our results show that students find simulated encounters to be beneficial during their clinical rotations. According to the survey responses in this study, simulated encounters were more beneficial for some rotations, like Internal Medicine, rather than other rotations. When asked which rotation benefited the most from these encounters, 44/85 of students selected IM rotations. In reviewing the written responses, many students commented that the simulated encounters were overall helpful to their education, however, the simulations will never be able to replace real clinical encounters. Since the simulated encounters take place during the second year of medical school before clinical encounters, these encounters may help build the foundation for third year medical students and beyond."

Benjamin W. Cooper [1], Nicholas A. Jaeger [1], Maureen A. Hirthler [1], and Cathy J. King [2]

1 -Lake Erie College of Osteopathic Medicine
2 -State College of Florida, Manatee-Sarasota

Please check out the full article at https://bit.ly/3KtlHm9

Link in bio!

Too Loose, Too Tight, But Never Just Right: Adhesions, Aspirations, and Atelectasis"Biofilms are cool, bacteria are cool...
04/05/2022

Too Loose, Too Tight, But Never Just Right: Adhesions, Aspirations, and Atelectasis

"Biofilms are cool, bacteria are cool, and the way that bacteria have evolved to work together is incredible, kinda spooky, and has important implications on the evolutionary history of multicellularity as well as potential clinical applications.
Let’s back up a second - what exactly are biofilms? Biofilm, a term coined in 1978 though the discovery of these structures’ existence dates back to the 17th century (Banthia et al, 2011), refers generally to a multicellular community of microorganisms encased within an extracellular matrix, invariably involving multiple species (Lopez et al, 2010). This extracellular matrix protects the encased bacteria from antibiotics and other methods of destruction, and in these states biofilms and their biological components can persist in the body for long periods of time. These films are present almost everywhere, from our teeth in the form of dental plaques to ships and pipes and even in geothermal vents."

Layla Siraj
Harvard Medical School

Please check out the full article at https://bit.ly/3y6oPSq

Link in bio!

Reducing Childhood Respiratory Infections through Interventions in Indoor Household Air Pollution in Rural Underdevelope...
03/05/2022

Reducing Childhood Respiratory Infections through Interventions in Indoor Household Air Pollution in Rural Underdeveloped Countries

“The current study reviewed various cooking-related interventions taken to decrease childhood respiratory illness in developing countries. Findings regarding the use of clean fuel over biomass fuels were controversial. While most studies found significant associations between the use of biomass fuels and respiratory infection, a handful of studies found a lack thereof. Notably, however, no studies found increased risk while using cleaner fuels and thus it seems that homes adopt no risk of harm with use. Although the current review does not assess the feasibility of interventions, the recommendation of clean fuel use in clinical practice may be warranted. As for stove-related alterations, effects were largely dependent on the specific intervention used; while the chimney stove intervention in the RESPIRE trial decreased severe pneumonia, the stoves used by Mortimer et al [27] with improved combustion efficacy had no significant effect on childhood respiratory infections. While less research has investigated the use of behavioural interventions, removing children from the kitchen while cooking was consistently associated with decreased respiratory infections. Behavioural interventions, such as this, require no implementation fees, maintenance costs or training and thus may be of particularly important use in decreasing respiratory infection in children."

Lisle Blackbourn and Erin Walton-Ball*
*co-first authors
Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland, School of Medicine

Please check out the full article at https://bit.ly/3vnn0ih

Link in bio!

The Danger of Genetic Risk Scores for Worsening Race-Based Disparities in Healthcare“Polygenic risk scores have tremendo...
02/05/2022

The Danger of Genetic Risk Scores for Worsening Race-Based Disparities in Healthcare

“Polygenic risk scores have tremendous potential in improving diagnostic prediction of disease and guiding treatment management. Because genetic studies have predominated in white European groups in the last twenty years, polygenic risk score prediction is well-characterized and optimized for these groups. Unfortunately, non-white individuals will benefit the least from polygenic risk scores if they were clinically deployed today. It is essential that we increase diversity in genetic databases, and we develop new tools to improve polygenic prediction in underrepresented groups. Otherwise, we will worsen race-based disparities in healthcare."

Sohail Zahid, MD, PhD
Harvard Medical School

Please check out the full article at https://bit.ly/36UF89T

Link in bio!

What’s in the Cauldron: Witches, Folk Remedies, and their Contributions to Modern Medicine“Disease is a part of the huma...
02/05/2022

What’s in the Cauldron: Witches, Folk Remedies, and their Contributions to Modern Medicine

“Disease is a part of the human condition and before the rigor of the scientific process and peer review, healers had to work with anecdotal folk remedies and word of mouth medicines. These folk remedies were often known by women and shaman who, throughout time, passed on their esoteric knowledge. Some of these remedies, like excretions from toads, Hemlock, Yew, and Foxglove have persisted for centuries and were used for a wide range of ailments. In modern days, with the use of the scientific process and peer review, these plants form the foundation of many medications. This demonstrates the benefit that can be gained with the investigation of folk medicine."

Mason Tate Bennett
Trinity School of Medicine

Please check out the full article at https://bit.ly/3OFQM9D

Link in bio!

Mental Health Referrals in Physician Aid in Dying Laws“In anticipation that my story and my call to action resonate with...
01/05/2022

Mental Health Referrals in Physician Aid in Dying Laws
“In anticipation that my story and my call to action resonate with medical educators across the country, I repeat the demands of community activists and LGBTQ physicians alike: we must be treated fairly, we must be respected, and we must be included in institutional leadership. Together, let us build a truly inclusive medical culture.”

Raquel Atencio [1] and Matthew Deblinger [2]
1 - Florida State University College of Medicine
2 - Aballi Milne Kalil

Please check out the full article at https://bit.ly/3EVZhsJ

Link in bio!

Race and Medicine: Black People Are Not Born Sick"University test writers: if race is used as an identifier in a clinica...
30/04/2022

Race and Medicine: Black People Are Not Born Sick

"University test writers: if race is used as an identifier in a clinical vignette, include information on the patient’s social context. Curriculum committee: survey lecture presentations to insure race is not purported to be a biological entity. When we teach medical students the perfect science of medicine, we simply cannot divorce from our imperfect world. We must prompt them to ask why they see disparities in order to avoid the dangerous assumptions of the past and pathologizing race. Only then can we identify the root causes and attempt to mitigate the inequities we see today."

Tiana Walker
University of Virginia School of Medicine

Please check out the full article at https://bit.ly/38rDPzI
Link in bio!

Gun Violence is Every Doctors’ Lane: Ways Healthcare Providers Can Protect Public Health"Healthcare providers have uniqu...
29/04/2022

Gun Violence is Every Doctors’ Lane: Ways Healthcare Providers Can Protect Public Health

"Healthcare providers have unique evidence-based skills at their disposal that can save lives. To achieve these gains, healthcare providers require legitimacy to have active conversations about gun safety. Physicians are guardians of public health – legislators and pro-gun advocacy leaders that demand physicians “stay in their lane” undermine this critical role. Now more than ever, we must continue to establish credibility in the gun violence sphere through evidence-based, socially sensitive care and advocacy.”

Alexander Pomerantz
Harvard Medical School

Please check out the full article at bit.ly/3kl2gl4
Link in bio!

Addressing Pervasive Homophobia in Medical Education “In anticipation that my story and my call to action resonate with ...
27/04/2022

Addressing Pervasive Homophobia in Medical Education

“In anticipation that my story and my call to action resonate with medical educators across the country, I repeat the demands of community activists and LGBTQ physicians alike: we must be treated fairly, we must be respected, and we must be included in institutional leadership. Together, let us build a truly inclusive medical culture.”

Michael H. O’Brien
University of South Carolina School of Medicine Greenville

Please check out the full article at https://www.hmsreview.org/issue6/homophobia-in-medical-education?rq=homophobia

Link in bio!

Michael H. O’Brien, BS M.D. Candidate at University of South Carolina School of Medicine Greenville Correspondence should be addressed to M.O. ([email protected])

HMSR Issue 6 is online now! Link in bio.
27/04/2022

HMSR Issue 6 is online now! Link in bio.

Please Ignore the Mask—Relearning the Patient Interview in the Age of COVID-19The COVID-19 pandemic has changed the pati...
11/04/2021

Please Ignore the Mask—Relearning the Patient Interview in the Age of COVID-19

The COVID-19 pandemic has changed the patient interview. In the context of personal protective equipment and social distancing guidelines, the development of therapeutic alliance proves more difficult than ever. As a new third-year medical student who is experiencing meaningful clinical work for the first time, the challenge of establishing rapport with patients is particularly great. Nonverbal communication is both essential and at risk of being lost in the current clinical environment. It is the author’s concern that the pandemic has rendered body language—both learned and instinctual—at best muffled and at worst impracticable, and that providers must explore unconventional ways to connect with patients. Use of humor and increased time spent at the bedside, amongst other strategies, represent potential solutions to this problem.

Peter F. James
Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University
Class of 2022

Please check out the full essay at hmsreview.org/covid/please-ignore-the-mask

Ethical Considerations in PPE Allocation During COVID-19: A Case StudyCOVID-19 created a critical shortage of medical su...
20/03/2021

Ethical Considerations in PPE Allocation During COVID-19: A Case Study

COVID-19 created a critical shortage of medical supplies such as personal protective equipment (PPE). A group of medical students in Chicago formed GetMePPE Chicago to assist frontline healthcare workers overcome the PPE shortage locally. PPE was obtained through several avenues: solicitation of donations from local businesses, fundraising efforts to purchase, manufacture by local craftsmen and engineers, and partnerships with local and national groups. An allocation strategy was designed to ensure efficient, equitable distribution of PPE. This framework is a scalable, efficient means of categorizing healthcare facilities for ethical and equitable distribution of PPE donations. It may be applied by similar organizations to address ongoing PPE shortages during this pandemic or adapted for use in other circumstances requiring the distribution of scarce resources in times of supply chain disruption.

Alex LT Clos, Ashley P Cohen, BSN, Lindsay E Edwards, BA, Allison HH Martin, MSc, Tazim S Merchant, Tricia Rae Pendergrast, Matthew A Siegel, Roger S Smith

Chicago Medical School at Rosalind Franklin University of Medicine and Science
Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine
University of Illinois at Chicago College of Medicine

Please check out the full essay at hmsreview.org/covid/ethical-considerations-in-ppe-allocation

The Impact of the COVID-19 Pandemic on Child and Adolescent Mental Health ConditionsThe COVID-19 pandemic has caused num...
22/02/2021

The Impact of the COVID-19 Pandemic on Child and Adolescent Mental Health Conditions

The COVID-19 pandemic has caused numerous unforeseen changes to the world, leading to a notable medical and social impact. Financial strain, social isolation, fear of the virus and its effects, and other stressors have had a profound effect on the health of healthcare workers and the population at large. This article serves as a narrative review of the mental health impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic, specifically on children and adolescents. A total of 39 articles were included, with the most commonly reported mental health conditions being anxiety disorders, depression, ADHD, and autism spectrum disorder. Other disorders impacted by the pandemic found in the literature include PTSD, sleep disturbance, somatic symptom disorders, and eating disorders, as well as significant concern regarding child abuse and neglect. Fear about the virus on health, social isolation, and financial and academic stress were some of the most common factors leading to worsening of mental health conditions. Furthermore, changes in daily structure, family interactions, and a lack of resources due to school closures served as major barriers for parents and patients. General guidance for providers has included utilizing telehealth and online therapy whenever possible, and recommendations for families have included creating appropriate structure within the home, minimizing exposure to stressors, and utilizing novel resources for children.

Gurjas S. Bajaj and Parna Prajapati, MD, MPH
Virginia Commonwealth University School of Medicine

Please check out the full essay at hmsreview.org/covid/child-and-adolescent-mental-health

MomentumNewton's first law of motion states that an object either remains at rest or continues to move at a constant vel...
01/12/2020

Momentum

Newton's first law of motion states that an object either remains at rest or continues to move at a constant velocity, unless acted upon by a force. Since the moment I decided to pursue medicine, I feel like I stepped onto a vector moving forward at constant velocity. Given the fast-paced nature of a medical curriculum, we must do our best to keep up with this momentum that is slowly bringing us towards this goal. The prolonged break from hospital rotations and standard curriculum many of us experienced due to COVID felt like a disruption to this process. While I am now slowly regaining my footing in clinical rotations, I often wonder if my pathway to medicine would have looked different had COVID not acted as a disrupting force.

Sara Twadell
FAU Charles E. Schmidt College of Medicine
Class of 2022

Physical Inactivity Crisis & the COVID-19 Pandemic: Time is Now to Implement Exercise as Medicine in Medical School Teac...
28/10/2020

Physical Inactivity Crisis & the COVID-19 Pandemic: Time is Now to Implement Exercise as Medicine in Medical School Teaching

Although there is robust evidence that physical activity (PA) is integral in preventing and managing chronic diseases, 80% of American adults do not meet the US Physical Activity Guidelines for exercise and 66% of American children are physically inactive every day. Clinicians are critical in assessing and prescribing PA for patients; however, less than half of patients reported being counselled on PA in a 12-month period. A PA focus is even more crucial due to COVID-19, as it creates new barriers to PA and individuals with chronic medical conditions are most vulnerable. Now is the time to address population health by educating medical students that exercise is medicine.

We suspect the main issue is the lack of exercise as medicine education in medical training, with more than half of students receiving no formal education on exercise and physicians frequently citing decreased knowledge as a barrier to discussing PA with patients. Evidence suggests education improves provider’s comfort prescribing exercise to their patients. We argue that PA education is imminently needed considering COVID-19 further contributes to sedentary lifestyles (e.g., gym/school closures, working from home). There are both current and downstream effects of the pandemic and with PA education, clinicians can mitigate the physical inactivity crisis.

We propose three recommendations for addressing PA in medicine: 1) implement PA education into required medical school curriculums, 2) create resources for patients who have significant barriers to PA and, 3) promote medical student wellness to increase the likelihood that they discuss PA with patients.

Nathan McLaughlin, Trevor Takami, and Cindy Lin, MD, FACSM
University of Washington School of Medicine

Please check out the full essay at hmsreview.org/covid/physical-inactivity-crisis

The Implications of Online Preclinical Medical Education: Voicing Student ConcernsDue to the COVID-19 pandemic, several ...
27/10/2020

The Implications of Online Preclinical Medical Education: Voicing Student Concerns

Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, several medical schools have opted to reformat preclinical instruction for online delivery to reduce the risk of transmission among faculty and students in classrooms. However, enthusiasm for adaptation has preceded current necessity, as some scholars’ have foretold an eventual “reimagining” of entirely online, open-access preclinical curricula. We, two first-year medical students, express concerns about the compromise of the student experience in service of this goal. Unexamined implementation of an online preclinical curriculum may threaten student satisfaction, class interconnectedness, professional development, student diversity, and overall attrition – potentially countering the efforts of recent decades of medical education reform. We ask the academic medical community to refrain from viewing interim online adaptations as a test-run for a supposed inevitability in preclinical medical instruction.

Tarika Srinivasan and Bethany Brumbaugh
Harvard Medical School
Class of 2024

Please check out the full essay at hmsreview.org/covid/implications-of-online-preclinical-medical-education



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The Harvard Medical Student Review (HMSR) is a student-run medical journal. Our mission is to provide a platform for students to contribute to important issues facing health and medicine through scholarly articles, commentary & editorials, interviews, and original artwork. Contributions are invited from the Harvard medical, dental, and public health schools, and extends to all graduate students at all institutions.