In geveb: A Journal of Yiddish Studies

In geveb: A Journal of Yiddish Studies In geveb is an online journal of Yiddish Studies.

We're excited to announce that our friends in Tel Aviv are preparing to launch their website, Iberzetz, a web journal fo...
08/31/2021

We're excited to announce that our friends in Tel Aviv are preparing to launch their website, Iberzetz, a web journal for Yiddish-to-Hebrew literary translations. Iberzetz welcomes submissions of Yiddish-to-Hebrew translations of prose and poetry to [email protected]. The submission deadline is October 15, 2021. See the attached flyer for further details.

We're excited to announce that our friends in Tel Aviv are preparing to launch their website, Iberzetz, a web journal for Yiddish-to-Hebrew literary translations. Iberzetz welcomes submissions of Yiddish-to-Hebrew translations of prose and poetry to [email protected]. The submission deadline is October 15, 2021. See the attached flyer for further details.

08/30/2021

Our friends Global Voices Theatre are seeking plays and performance works written by Jewish writers, translated to or written in English. This is for their upcoming event Global Jewish Voices in spring 2022, a showcase of international Jewish plays and performance texts curated by theatre maker and live artist Victor Esses, at an Off West End London venue.

Jewish writers from anywhere in the world are welcome to submit but submissions by writers who identify as women, trans, nonbinary, q***r, Sephardic, North African, Latinx, POC, disabled, or are otherwise underrepresented within the Jewish diaspora, are particularly encouraged.

Writers can find all the details about the event and submit their work via this link: https://forms.gle/Rapuuy53Cwqkcjt97

This is a paid opportunity. The deadline for submissions is Friday 16 September GMT 5pm.

We're hiring! In geveb is seeking a part-time (8-10 hours per week) Translations Editor to coordinate the Texts and Tran...
07/12/2021
In geveb is Seeking a Managing Editor for Texts and Translations | In geveb

We're hiring!

In geveb is seeking a part-time (8-10 hours per week) Translations Editor to coordinate the Texts and Translation section for the 2021-2022 academic year, with the possibility to renew the contract in subsequent years.

https://ingeveb.org/blog/in-geveb-is-seeking-a-managing-editor-for-texts-and-translations

In geveb is an open-access digital forum for the publication of peer-reviewed academic articles, the translation and annotation of Yiddish texts, the exchange of pedagogical materials, and a blog of Yiddish cultural life.

It's official, we're on summer publishing break!  We're proud share our accomplishments from the past year. We're wishin...
06/30/2021
Announcing our Summer Publishing Hafsoke | In geveb

It's official, we're on summer publishing break! We're proud share our accomplishments from the past year. We're wishing a fond farewell to Saul Noam Zaritt, Sunny Yudkoff, and Daniel Kennedy, who did so much to build and grow our journal. Most of all, we thank YOU, our readers, for being a part of our In geveb community.

As we head into our summer publishing break, we share our accomplishments from the past year. Most of all, we thank you for being a part of our In geveb communi

06/29/2021

From our friends at UT Austin:

Call for conference papers: ‘New Approaches to Isaac Bashevis Singer’

University of Texas, Austin, March 27-29, 2022

The conference will take place at the University of Texas, Austin and The Harry Ransom Center (HRC) which holds the archive of I.B. Singer. In connection with the conference, the HRC will create an exhibit of materials from the Singer archive. It will include a public lecture by Aaron Lansky and an academic keynote lecture by Dr. Jan Schwarz . The conference and exhibit are a collaboration between the Schusterman Center for Jewish Studies at UT, the HRC and Lund University, Sweden.

The archive at the HRC is a rich source of primary material – manuscripts, correspondence, interviews etc. – which enable new, exciting approaches to Singer. The ongoing digitization of the Jewish press gives immediate access to Yiddish newspapers and journals such as Literarishe bleter, Undzer expres and Forverts to which Singer contributed as freelancer and staff writer for almost sixty years.

We invite proposals for papers that utilize the primary sources listed above as well as other Yiddish materials in methodologically innovative ways. The conference will include sessions about various aspects of Singer’s work in the context of interdisciplinary fields such as (but not limited to) world literature, translation, feuilleton, life-writing, gender and performance. Conference proposals should have a specific focus that is formulated in a way that opens it up to scholars from all disciplines working on any aspect of Singer’s work and/or legacy. The goal is to assemble a group of scholars who will bring a diversity of perspectives on Isaac B. Singer.

We will provide accommodations (hotel and meals) in Austin for the duration of the conference. There will be a possibility for coverage of travel expenses for younger scholars without institutional affiliation. All arrangements are subject to change according to policies of The University of Texas at Austin.

Please send an abstract of about 300 words and a current vita to [email protected] by August 15, 2021. We plan to publish the conference proceedings in a special issue of an academic journal or an edited book.

Conference Organizers:

Jan Schwarz, Associate Professor, Centre for Languages and Literatures, Lund University

Itzik Gottesman, Senior Lecturer, Department of Germanic Studies & Schusterman Center for Jewish Studies, The University of Texas at Austin

Hans C. Boas, Professor, Department of Germanic Studies and Department of Linguistics, The University of Texas at Austin

Tatjana Lichtenstein, Associate Professor, Department of History,
Director, Schusterman Center for Jewish Studies, The University of Texas at Austin

We published, you read: Check out the top ten most popular pieces in In geveb this year, from children’s book reports to...
06/28/2021
Reader Favorites 2020-2021 | In geveb

We published, you read: Check out the top ten most popular pieces in In geveb this year, from children’s book reports to a peer reviewed special issue:

The top ten most popular things we published this year, from children's book reports to a peer reviewed special issue.

In honor of  the centennial of the 1921 Tulsa race massacre, YIVO Institute for Jewish Research and In geveb partnered t...
06/25/2021
Reckoning with American Racism and Racist Violence, af Yiddish | In geveb

In honor of the centennial of the 1921 Tulsa race massacre, YIVO Institute for Jewish Research and In geveb partnered to update our special issue on Yiddish representations of American race and racism, with new translations, essays, and pedagogical reflections that reflect local and transnational Yiddish views on early twentieth century American racist violence. You can read the introduction to this new collection here.

In this updated version of our special issue on Race, af Yiddish, we offer a range of texts about local and international Yiddish representations of early twent

“It is a book whose stories are at times hard to understand and at other times we wish we hadn’t understood.”Raphi Halff...
06/24/2021
Review of Sutzkever Essential Prose, translated by Zackary Sholem Berger | In geveb

“It is a book whose stories are at times hard to understand and at other times we wish we hadn’t understood.”

Raphi Halff reviews Sutzkever Essential Prose, a new translation by Zackary Sholem Berger.

Halff offers a specific and detailed critique of the translation, while also acknowledging that in this book, filled with Sutzkever’s metaphors, imagery, and mo

When the COVID-19 pan­dem­ic hit in ear­ly 2020, a team of schol­ars led at Uni­ver­si­ty Col­lege Lon­don was in the mi...
06/07/2021
Language and Trust in a Perilous Time: Translating COVID-19 Public Health Information into Yiddish in Hasidic Communities | In geveb

When the COVID-19 pan­dem­ic hit in ear­ly 2020, a team of schol­ars led at Uni­ver­si­ty Col­lege Lon­don was in the midst of a long-term inter­na­tion­al study on con­tem­po­rary uses of Yid­dish in Hasidic com­mu­ni­ties. They made a quick pivot to trans­lat­ing offi­cial COVID-19 guide­lines into Yid­dish to help the Hasidic com­mu­ni­ties have access to crit­i­cal and rapid­ly chang­ing pub­lic health infor­ma­tion.

In Novem­ber 2020 the UCL schol­ars Lily Kahn, Krisz­ta Eszter Szen­droi, Sonya Yam­pol­skaya, Zoë Belk and Eli Bene­dict dis­cussed their impor­tant work dur­ing the pan­dem­ic with Rhona Sei­del­man, a his­to­ri­an of pub­lic health who has writ­ten about the impact of lan­guage bar­ri­ers in med­ical settings.

Rhona Seidelman interviews the researchers of the University College London Contemporary Hasidic Yiddish Project about their public health translation work duri

“Scenes of scandalous dancing are exciting, and they allow writers to entertain their readers while also making a politi...
06/01/2021
Ten Things That Lead to Mixed Dancing in Yiddish Literature | In geveb

“Scenes of scandalous dancing are exciting, and they allow writers to entertain their readers while also making a political point about topics such as acculturation, secularization, sexual morality, and arranged marriages.” Sonia Gollance with a listicle inspired by her new book.

A tour through the more surprising moments of mixed dancing in Yiddish literature, from dancing with the dead to dancing with a pickle.

We are pleased to present the newest install­ment of our annu­al effort to gath­er togeth­er the lat­est pub­li­ca­tions...
05/28/2021
The Latest in Yiddish Studies in English: 2020 | In geveb

We are pleased to present the newest install­ment of our annu­al effort to gath­er togeth­er the lat­est pub­li­ca­tions rel­e­vant to Yid­dish Stud­ies in Eng­lish. The list includes schol­ar­ship in the form of books, arti­cles, book chap­ters, spe­cial edi­tions, and dis­ser­ta­tions pub­lished in 2020. Each entry is fol­lowed by a short sum­ma­ry and avail­able links to online material.

If you are inter­est­ed in com­pil­ing a sim­i­lar list for schol­ar­ship pub­lished in anoth­er lan­guage, we encour­age you to reach out to us. Please also con­tact us if you have any sug­gest­ed addi­tions to the cur­rent bibliography.

The latest installment of our annual effort to gather together the latest publications relevant to Yiddish Studies in English.

“Shandler’s biography can be read as a chronicle of expanding notions of folkstimlekhkayt, from the old vos far a yid re...
05/24/2021
Review of Yiddish: A Biography of a Language by Jeffrey Shandler | In geveb

“Shandler’s biography can be read as a chronicle of expanding notions of folkstimlekhkayt, from the old vos far a yid redt nisht ken yidish (what kind of [Ashkenazi] Jew doesn’t speak Yiddish) standard to the Yiddish being used and developed by cohorts of non-native speakers.” Michael Wex reviews Jeffrey Shandler’s Yiddish: Biography of a Language.

Shandler’s biography can be read as a chronicle of expanding notions of folkstimlekhkayt, from the old vos far a yid redt nisht ken yidish (what kind of [Ashken

This Friday, we are proud to be joining the YIVO Institute for Jewish Research in sponsoring a panel at the John Hope Fr...
05/24/2021
The Future of Tulsa's Past: The Centennial of the Tulsa Race Massacre and Beyond | YIVO Institute for Jewish Research

This Friday, we are proud to be joining the YIVO Institute for Jewish Research in sponsoring a panel at the
John Hope Franklin Research Center's 12th Annual Reconciliation in America National Symposium, “The Future of Tulsa’s Past: The Centennial of the Tulsa Race Massacre and Beyond.” Our panel on Yiddish coverage/representations of racist violence in the early 20th century features Jessica Kirzane (chair), Uri Schreter, Alyssa Quint, Hannah Pollin-Galay, and Steven Zipperstein. Look out for related publications on In geveb in June. We're grateful for all these partners in expanding conversations about how racial violence was understood and represented in Yiddish language sources.

Join YIVO and In Geveb for a panel discussion on contemporaneous Yiddish language archival sources which reflect on the Tulsa Race Massacre, as well as on racially motivated violence that erupted in America in the early twentieth century more broadly. This panel is part of the John Hope Franklin Cen...

“German as a Jewish Language challenges the distinctions made between “Jewish” and “non-Jewish” languages and concurrent...
05/18/2021
The Place of German in the History of Jewish Nationalism: Review of German as a Jewish Problem by Marc Volovici | In geveb

“German as a Jewish Language challenges the distinctions made between “Jewish” and “non-Jewish” languages and concurrently emphasizes the permeability between disciplinary boundaries.” Lea Greenberg reviews Marc Volovici’s book.

German as a Jewish Language challenges the distinctions made between “Jewish” and “non-Jewish” languages and concurrently emphasizes the permeability between di

“For a Jewish audience or readership to identify with Shylock as Shakespeare wrote him is not easy. Although Shylock has...
05/13/2021
Speaking Through Shylock's Lips: The Merchant of Venice on The Yiddish Stage | In geveb

“For a Jewish audience or readership to identify with Shylock as Shakespeare wrote him is not easy. Although Shylock has moments of soaring humanity – “if you prick us, do we not bleed?” being the best known example – he quickly returns to two-dimensional vileness. I have seen The Merchant of Venice several times in stage and film adaptations, and each time have found it to be a profoundly unsettling experience, marked by a confusing mixture of sympathy, disgust, outrage, and fascination. So why, I found myself wondering, would anyone have bothered to translate this work into Yiddish? If, as a 1903 New York Times review of Jacob Adler’s portrayal of Shylock put it, “to make Shylock fully sympathetic to a Jewish audience is virtually impossible,” how could the Merchant of Venice have been performed by Yiddish-speaking actors, in Yiddish theaters, to the delight of a Yiddish-speaking audience?”

Eve Romm reflects on the problem of Shylock on the Yiddish stage.

Eve Romm traces the many approaches to resolving the problem of Shylock on the Yiddish stage, from apologetics to heroism.

Dean Franco reviews Benjamin Schreier’s “historiographical critique of the well-established but highly marginal field of...
05/10/2021
Review of The Rise and Fall of Jewish American Literature by Benjamin Schreier | In geveb

Dean Franco reviews Benjamin Schreier’s “historiographical critique of the well-established but highly marginal field of Jewish American literary studies, including its contingent relation to other Jewish literatures, its attenuated relation to American literature more broadly, and its awkward relation to the wider field of Ethnic Studies.”

The Rise and Fall makes strikingly clear claims about all that is wrong with the field, from its insiderism to its uncritical reliance on “culture” and “ethnici

Tanya Yakovleva reflects on her experience teaching Yiddish during the pandemic.
05/07/2021
Diary of a Yiddish Teacher During the Pandemic | In geveb

Tanya Yakovleva reflects on her experience teaching Yiddish during the pandemic.

Despite the pandemic, Yiddish culture flourished online. Tanya Yakovleva describes her role as an online Yiddish teacher during this time.

Presenting our latest Special Issue: Yiddish and the Transnational in Latin America.Featuring contributions from Claire ...
05/05/2021
Yiddish and the Transnational in Latin America | In geveb

Presenting our latest Special Issue: Yiddish and the Transnational in Latin America.

Featuring contributions from Claire Solomon, Lila Fabro, Zachary Baker, Arturo Kerbel, Tamara Gleason Freidberg, and Rachelle Grossman. Edited by Yitzhak Lewis.

A wide array of scholarly articles exploring the interrelation of the national and the transnational in Yiddish cultural production in Latin America.

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General information

In geveb is an open-access digital forum for the publication of peer-reviewed academic articles, the translation and annotation of Yiddish texts, the presentation of digitized research and archival documents, the exchange of pedagogical materials, and a blog of Yiddish cultural life. In geveb has received generous support from the Naomi Prawer Kadar Foundation, Inc. (naomi.org).

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