Civil War Chronicles

Civil War Chronicles The Civil War Chronicles is an organization dedicated to the education and enlightenment of the American Civil War.

Operating as usual

By the morning of September 15, Jackson had positioned nearly 50 guns on Maryland Heights and at the base of Loudoun Hei...
09/15/2021

By the morning of September 15, Jackson had positioned nearly 50 guns on Maryland Heights and at the base of Loudoun Heights. He began a fierce artillery barrage from all sides and ordered an infantry assault.
Col. Dixon Miles realized that the situation was hopeless and agreed with his subordinates to raise the white flag of surrender. Before he could surrender personally, he was mortally wounded by an artillery shell and died the next day. After processing more than 12,000 Union prisoners, Jackson's men then rushed to Sharpsburg, Maryland, to rejoin Lee along the banks of the Antietam Creek…

By the morning of September 15, Jackson had positioned nearly 50 guns on Maryland Heights and at the base of Loudoun Heights. He began a fierce artillery barrage from all sides and ordered an infantry assault.
Col. Dixon Miles realized that the situation was hopeless and agreed with his subordinates to raise the white flag of surrender. Before he could surrender personally, he was mortally wounded by an artillery shell and died the next day. After processing more than 12,000 Union prisoners, Jackson's men then rushed to Sharpsburg, Maryland, to rejoin Lee along the banks of the Antietam Creek…

09/15/2021

The Sunken Road/Bloody Lane at Sharpsburg

Henry Jackson Hunt was born September 14, 1819 in Michigan. He was Chief of Artillery in the Army of the Potomac during ...
09/14/2021

Henry Jackson Hunt was born September 14, 1819 in Michigan. He was Chief of Artillery in the Army of the Potomac during the American Civil War and is recognized as a brilliant artillery tactician and strategist. The tactical skills he brought to the field affected the outcome in battles. Battles like Malvern Hill, South Mountain, Antietam, Fredericksburg, and Chancellorsville. Where Hunt receives most notoriety is at Gettysburg. After the war Hunt held various military posts.

General Ambrose Burnside was a railroad executive, inventor, industrialist, and politician from Rhode Island. Initially ...
09/13/2021

General Ambrose Burnside was a railroad executive, inventor, industrialist, and politician from Rhode Island. Initially he served during the Civil War as colonel of the 1st Rhode Island Infantry. After the First Battle of Manassas he was made a Brigadier General. He later led an expeditionary force in North Carolina and served during the Maryland Campaign at the Battle of Antietam where his men were repulsed for nearly three hours by Confederates denying Union soldiers from crossing the bridge. He was removed from command in January, 1863 after the Union met a devastating defeat at the Battle of Fredericksburg.

After the war Burnside was elected Governor of Rhode Island from 1866 to 1869, and later served as a United States Senator for Rhode Island from 1875 until his death on September 13, 1881. Burnside was laid to rest at Swan Point Cemetery in Providence, Rhode Island.

Major General John Sedgwick was born in this day, September 13, 1813, in Cornwall, Connecticut.
09/13/2021

Major General John Sedgwick was born in this day, September 13, 1813, in Cornwall, Connecticut.

As darkness fell on September 11, 1862, Westminster, Maryland was unexpectedly raided by Confederate Colonel Thomas L. R...
09/11/2021

As darkness fell on September 11, 1862, Westminster, Maryland was unexpectedly raided by Confederate Colonel Thomas L. Rosser of the 5th Virginia Cavalry. He led a few hundred cavalrymen into the city looting what they could and vandalizing some local buildings. Southern sympathizers welcomed the soldiers. Rosser and his men left the following day. This all while General Lee began moving forces throughout Maryland in the days before the battle to be fought at Sharpsburg, Maryland.

During the summer of 1861, Union and Confederate forces struggled for control of western Virginia. The area was of consi...
09/10/2021

During the summer of 1861, Union and Confederate forces struggled for control of western Virginia. The area was of considerable importance because gaps in the Appalachian Mountains connected the East to the Midwest. On September 10, 1861 Union forces under Brigadier General William Rosecrans clashed with Rebel soldiers under Confederate Brigadier General John Floyd at the Battle of Carnifex Ferry. Although the Union suffered greater losses confederate forces ultimately retreated. The battle was a strategic victory for Rosecrans. Now, with much weaker presence in the area eventually the Confederates withdraw from western Virginia, which will lead to the creation of the State of West Virginia two years later. (Battlefield images from WV park services)

193 years ago on September 8, 1828 Joshua Lawrence Chamberlain was born in Brewer, Maine. A graduate of Bangor Theologic...
09/08/2021

193 years ago on September 8, 1828 Joshua Lawrence Chamberlain was born in Brewer, Maine. A graduate of Bangor Theological Seminary he would go on to lead the 20th Maine at Fredericksburg, Gettysburg and Petersburg where he was severely wounded suffering the pain from that wound the rest of his life. After the war Chamberlain served as Governor to the state of Maine and President of Bowdoin College.

“in great deeds something abides.”

193 years ago on September 8, 1828 Joshua Lawrence Chamberlain was born in Brewer, Maine. A graduate of Bangor Theological Seminary he would go on to lead the 20th Maine at Fredericksburg, Gettysburg and Petersburg where he was severely wounded suffering the pain from that wound the rest of his life. After the war Chamberlain served as Governor to the state of Maine and President of Bowdoin College.

“in great deeds something abides.”

William "Extra Billy" Smith was born September 6, 1797.Colonel of the 49th Virginia at the start of the war war he left ...
09/06/2021

William "Extra Billy" Smith was born September 6, 1797.

Colonel of the 49th Virginia at the start of the war war he left briefly to served in the Confederate Congress in 1862. He returned to active military service and was present for the Peninsula Campaign. Wounded at the Battle of Fair Oaks, Smith was commended for his command in “characteristic coolness” and “fearlessness”. Smith recovered and would see fierce fighting at Antietam where he remained "conspicuously brave and self-possessed”.
At Gettysburg, Smith was unsuccessful on Culp's Hill engaged against Union Brigadier General George Greene. He resigned from the Confederate army in December of 1863 having achieved the rank of major general and went on to serve as Governor of Virginia.

Interesting note by author Scott Mingus Sr. is how William Smith got his nickname, Extra Billy. Per Mingus, he was "known nationally as “Extra Billy” because of his prewar penchant for finding loopholes in government postal contracts to gain extra money for his stagecoach lines."

Beautiful Sharpsburg sunrise as today marks the beginning of the Maryland Campaign. A bold move for the Army of Northern...
09/04/2021

Beautiful Sharpsburg sunrise as today marks the beginning of the Maryland Campaign. A bold move for the Army of Northern Virginia..

Beautiful Sharpsburg sunrise as today marks the beginning of the Maryland Campaign. A bold move for the Army of Northern Virginia..

Now, on September 1, 1862, as the day faded and a thunderous storm rained down on the retreating Union army from their l...
09/01/2021

Now, on September 1, 1862, as the day faded and a thunderous storm rained down on the retreating Union army from their loss at Second Bull Run, General Robert E. Lee kept pressure on Federal forces. The Yankees were limping their way back to the protection of Washington, D. C when the Rebel army, in an attempt to outflank them, attacked at Chantilly in Fair Fax County, Virginia. The battle only raged for a few hours and combat turned to bayonet v bayonet when dry ammunition ran out. Union officers, General Isaac Stevens and Major General Philip Kearny, were killed in this action. The results may have been inconclusive but Chantilly like Second Bull run added to Lee’s confidence in his army and was the ignition he needed to advance forward in the Maryland Campaign that would have both armies facing each other at Sharpsburg, Maryland in the coming weeks.

Now, after a major defeat at the Battle of Second Manassas, Federal forces crawled back to the relative safety of Washin...
08/31/2021

Now, after a major defeat at the Battle of Second Manassas, Federal forces crawled back to the relative safety of Washington, DC. through Centerville on August 31, 1862. The defeat allowed Confederate General Robert E. Lee to continue his northward advance and cross the Potomac River.

The Confederate victory a day earlier crushed the Union similarly to the first defeat at Bull Run a year earlier. A successful Union rearguard action prevented total devastation of its army. For all intents and purposes the Second Battle of Manassas was a decisive victory for the South that gave General Lee confidence in his invincible army and the morale of his men to continue an offensive campaign into the Fall of 1862.

Thank you to Civil War Chronicles' follower, Lee McGinnis, for his photos of the battlefield.

John Bell Hood's aggressive fighting tactics earned him the distinction of being one of the most rapidly promoted leader...
08/30/2021

John Bell Hood's aggressive fighting tactics earned him the distinction of being one of the most rapidly promoted leaders in the Confederate military forces during the Civil War. He fought in many major battles of the war. Beginning with the Peninsula Campaign to the battles of Second Manassas, Sharpsburg, Fredericksburg, Gettysburg (where he was severely wounded on the second day's fighting) and Chickamauga.

Now, it was during the Franklin-Nashville Campaign that Hood suffered his greatest defeats and high numbers of causalities.
After the war John Bell Hood moved to New Orleans. He died of yellow fever on August 30, 1879.

John Bell Hood's aggressive fighting tactics earned him the distinction of being one of the most rapidly promoted leaders in the Confederate military forces during the Civil War. He fought in many major battles of the war. Beginning with the Peninsula Campaign to the battles of Second Manassas, Sharpsburg, Fredericksburg, Gettysburg (where he was severely wounded on the second day's fighting) and Chickamauga.

Now, it was during the Franklin-Nashville Campaign that Hood suffered his greatest defeats and high numbers of causalities.
After the war John Bell Hood moved to New Orleans. He died of yellow fever on August 30, 1879.

The "Battle Cry of Freedom", also known as "Rally 'Round the Flag", is a song written in 1862 by American composer Georg...
08/30/2021

The "Battle Cry of Freedom", also known as "Rally 'Round the Flag", is a song written in 1862 by American composer George Frederick Root. Root was born August 30, 1820 in Sheffield, Massachusetts. Click this link to listen to the song that sparked patriotism in the North.

https://www.google.com/url?sa=t&source=web&rct=j&url=https://m.youtube.com/watch%3Fv%3DbW4ZwyYJYbQ&ved=2ahUKEwi-npzrxdjyAhU5TTABHWbAC4UQwqsBegQIGBAE&usg=AOvVaw1CPKYlJPi7I8rf91fxuycK&cshid=1630319653843

The "Battle Cry of Freedom", also known as "Rally 'Round the Flag", is a song written in 1862 by American composer George Frederick Root. Root was born August 30, 1820 in Sheffield, Massachusetts. Click this link to listen to the song that sparked patriotism in the North.

https://www.google.com/url?sa=t&source=web&rct=j&url=https://m.youtube.com/watch%3Fv%3DbW4ZwyYJYbQ&ved=2ahUKEwi-npzrxdjyAhU5TTABHWbAC4UQwqsBegQIGBAE&usg=AOvVaw1CPKYlJPi7I8rf91fxuycK&cshid=1630319653843

This week, we lost two very different students of the American Civil War.Stephen B. Oates was a renowned Historian and P...
08/29/2021

This week, we lost two very different students of the American Civil War.
Stephen B. Oates was a renowned Historian and Professor at The University of Massachusetts. He became widely known by his great insights in the Ken Burns Civil War series.
Charlie Watts was not only the drummer in the world’s most popular band for decades-The Rolling Stones, but an avid student and collector of Civil War artifacts.
Both will be missed and our hearts go out to everyone’s lives these two touched.

Brigadier General Benjamin Grubb Humphreys was born August 26, 1808. He fought with the 21st Mississippi Infantry under ...
08/26/2021

Brigadier General Benjamin Grubb Humphreys was born August 26, 1808. He fought with the 21st Mississippi Infantry under the command of Brigadier General William Barksdale.

Now, during the Battle of Gettysburg Humphreys's regiment successfully attacked the Union at the Peach Orchard forcing them back to Cemetery Ridge. Barksdale was killed at Gettysburg and Humphreys took command of the brigade earning promotion to Brigadier General.
At the Battle of Berryville in 1864, he was severely wounded and unable to return to service. Later he became governor of Mississippi from 1865–1868 during the time of reconstruction.

Brigadier General Benjamin Grubb Humphreys was born August 26, 1808. He fought with the 21st Mississippi Infantry under the command of Brigadier General William Barksdale.

Now, during the Battle of Gettysburg Humphreys's regiment successfully attacked the Union at the Peach Orchard forcing them back to Cemetery Ridge. Barksdale was killed at Gettysburg and Humphreys took command of the brigade earning promotion to Brigadier General.
At the Battle of Berryville in 1864, he was severely wounded and unable to return to service. Later he became governor of Mississippi from 1865–1868 during the time of reconstruction.

Under Confederate General Braxton Bragg, the Chickamauga campaign began on  August of 1863. In the coming weeks Bragg's ...
08/22/2021

Under Confederate General Braxton Bragg, the Chickamauga campaign began on August of 1863. In the coming weeks Bragg's objective was for his Army of Tennessee to block the Federal Army from entering Chattanooga. This was an important strategic area and the Union army was determined to keep this line open. To Union General Rosecrans it was the Federal lifeline and he needed to control at least one of two roads. Either the LaFayette Road, passing through Rossville Gap or the Dry Valley Road. This crossed West of the Chickamauga Creek and eventually passed through the Ridge at McFarland's Gap. If Rosecrans failed he feared it could result in total destruction of the entire Federal Army.

Now, a second attempt was made to seize a critical portion of the vital railway that connected Petersburg to Wilmington,...
08/18/2021

Now, a second attempt was made to seize a critical portion of the vital railway that connected Petersburg to Wilmington, North Carolina by the Union. The Battle of the Weldon Railroad was fought between August 18–21, 1864 and resulted in a major victory. This win for Ulysses S Grant furthered weakened General Robert E Lee's army by capturing one of the Confederate's most important supply lines.

The Battle of Antietam (Sharpsburg) was the bloodiest single day of the war. Other than being struck by an artillery she...
08/17/2021

The Battle of Antietam (Sharpsburg) was the bloodiest single day of the war. Other than being struck by an artillery shell during the battle, the Sherrick farmhouse and outbuildings suffered very little damage. Now, the six weeks following the battle the Union bivouacked on the Sherrick property using it as a field hospital to care for the thousands wounded and dead in the fields. The Union army damaged fields and crops to resupply its soldiers and care for the wounded. This caused more damage then the battle itself.

The Battle of Antietam (Sharpsburg) was the bloodiest single day of the war. Other than being struck by an artillery shell during the battle, the Sherrick farmhouse and outbuildings suffered very little damage. Now, the six weeks following the battle the Union bivouacked on the Sherrick property using it as a field hospital to care for the thousands wounded and dead in the fields. The Union army damaged fields and crops to resupply its soldiers and care for the wounded. This caused more damage then the battle itself.

08/12/2021
Thomas Chamberlain, Colonel of the 20th Maine, died August 12, 1896 at the age of 55. Chamberlain fought alongside his b...
08/12/2021

Thomas Chamberlain, Colonel of the 20th Maine, died August 12, 1896 at the age of 55. Chamberlain fought alongside his brothers and served under his oldest brother Joshua Lawrence Chamberlain. Thomas was present at many of the most significant battles of the Civil War.

Fredericksburg, was the first major engagement for Chamberlain. He spent the night on the battlefield under horrible frigid conditions with the wounded and dead from many regiments. Most notably, after missing Chancellorsville, he was on Little Round Top defending the hill with the 20th Maine at the Battle of Gettysburg. His service remained with the 20th Maine where he saw heavy fighting at Spotsylvania and Petersburg where he was constantly at his brother’s side who was seriously wounded in the battle. In the final year of the war he was breveted Lieutenant Colonel for his bravery at the Battle of Five Forks and Appomattox.

He returned home to Maine after the war and married Delia Jarvis in 1870. The couple did not have any children. The Civil War changed Thomas. He was unable to hold onto a job and suffered from alcoholism which impacted his overall health. His heart and lung function were compromised from his heavy drinking. He contracted typhoid fever and would not recover. Thomas Chamberlain is buried in Castine Cemetery in Castine, Maine. The link included is from Thomas Chamberlain’s obituary in the Bangor Whig and Courier, August 13, 1896.

http://www.users.globalnet.co.uk/~pardos/TomChObituary.html

Thomas Chamberlain, Colonel of the 20th Maine, died August 12, 1896 at the age of 55. Chamberlain fought alongside his brothers and served under his oldest brother Joshua Lawrence Chamberlain. Thomas was present at many of the most significant battles of the Civil War.

Fredericksburg, was the first major engagement for Chamberlain. He spent the night on the battlefield under horrible frigid conditions with the wounded and dead from many regiments. Most notably, after missing Chancellorsville, he was on Little Round Top defending the hill with the 20th Maine at the Battle of Gettysburg. His service remained with the 20th Maine where he saw heavy fighting at Spotsylvania and Petersburg where he was constantly at his brother’s side who was seriously wounded in the battle. In the final year of the war he was breveted Lieutenant Colonel for his bravery at the Battle of Five Forks and Appomattox.

He returned home to Maine after the war and married Delia Jarvis in 1870. The couple did not have any children. The Civil War changed Thomas. He was unable to hold onto a job and suffered from alcoholism which impacted his overall health. His heart and lung function were compromised from his heavy drinking. He contracted typhoid fever and would not recover. Thomas Chamberlain is buried in Castine Cemetery in Castine, Maine. The link included is from Thomas Chamberlain’s obituary in the Bangor Whig and Courier, August 13, 1896.

http://www.users.globalnet.co.uk/~pardos/TomChObituary.html

Address

Gettysburg, PA

Alerts

Be the first to know and let us send you an email when Civil War Chronicles posts news and promotions. Your email address will not be used for any other purpose, and you can unsubscribe at any time.

Nearby media companies


Other Broadcasting & media production in Gettysburg

Show All