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The Gettysburg Review

The Gettysburg Review The Gettysburg Review, one of the country’s premier literary quarterlies, is, as one reader put it

Operating as usual

More bad news for literary magazines, we're afraid. While we're grateful to still be here, due to budgetary and staffing...
03/22/2022
Gettysburg Review Blog

More bad news for literary magazines, we're afraid. While we're grateful to still be here, due to budgetary and staffing reductions beyond our control, we have to change from a quarterly (which we've been since our founding in 1988) to a triannual.

If you are a current subscriber, we assure you that, regardless of this change, you will receive all the issues that are currently owed to you, and the magazine will be the same high quality you're used to.

Read our full announcement here:
https://www.gettysburgreview.com/about/news/detail.dot?id=8129be2b-049c-4b29-96d6-f04cbe97a124&pageTitle=CHANGES%20AT%20THE%20GETTYSBURG%20REVIEW&story=true

CHANGES AT THE GETTYSBURG REVIEW 18 March 2022 Dear Subscribers, Readers, Contributors, and Supporters, Due to budgetary and staffing reductions triggered by circumstances well beyond our control, Lauren and I have made the difficult decision to change the Gettysburg Review’s publication frequency...

Hey all, just a heads up that we are no longer by default italicizing non-English words. It’s both othering and unnecess...
09/23/2021

Hey all, just a heads up that we are no longer by default italicizing non-English words. It’s both othering and unnecessary, and we apologize for taking so long.

33.3 features Spanish, Italian, French, and more. We hope you disfrútala/divertirsi/profitez-en!

So thrilled to see Honorée Fanonne Jeffers on this list!!https://www.nationalbook.org/2021-national-book-awards-longlist...
09/21/2021
2021 National Book Awards Longlist for Fiction - National Book Foundation

So thrilled to see Honorée Fanonne Jeffers on this list!!

https://www.nationalbook.org/2021-national-book-awards-longlist-for-fiction/

The ten contenders for the National Book Award for Fiction The National Book Foundation announced the Longlist for the 2021 National Book Award for Fiction. The Finalists in all five categories will be revealed on October 5. The 2021 Fiction Longlist includes writers at all stages of their careers,....

New issue with Red Stool (4:40 p.m. September).On the cover, Borrowed Aloe with Red Rectangle (10 a.m. September) by Jen...
09/14/2021

New issue with Red Stool (4:40 p.m. September).

On the cover, Borrowed Aloe with Red Rectangle (10 a.m. September) by Jenny Brillhart

New cover. New issue. Preorder now!With paintings by Jenny Brillhart, fiction by Jeff Frawley, Matthew Raymond, Kevin Br...
09/06/2021

New cover. New issue. Preorder now!

With paintings by Jenny Brillhart, fiction by Jeff Frawley, Matthew Raymond, Kevin Breen, Kay Bontempo, and David Blanton; essays by Anne Kenner, Kathy Flann, and Phillip Hurst; poetry by Rosalie Moffett, Ann Keniston, Evan Blake, Lynn Domina, John McCarthy, D. S. Waldman, Diane Martini, James Harms, John Bargowski, Jill McDonough, Ed Falco, Jeffrey Harrison, Sharon Dolin, Danusha Laméris, Lance Larsen, Richard Lyons, Linda Pastan, Mark Kraushaar, Melissa Kwasny, and Nance Van Winckel.

https://www.gettysburgreview.com/store/#!/Volume-33-Number-3-Preorder-Now/p/388755037/category=20192291

As Pride month wraps up,  we're thinking of Kathryn Harlan's "Take Only What Belongs to You" and queer love stories, bot...
06/29/2021

As Pride month wraps up, we're thinking of Kathryn Harlan's "Take Only What Belongs to You" and queer love stories, both told and untold.

05/20/2021

Just a friendly reminder that submissions close on May 31st!

"Dissent has started to appear to me as a series of slow, uncoiling choices, inexorable change. It is no longer what I m...
05/17/2021

"Dissent has started to appear to me as a series of slow, uncoiling choices, inexorable change. It is no longer what I might DO, but what I might BE."

Jen Silverman's essay "The Dissenters" from 33.2 is up at Lit Hub today. Check it out!

http://ow.ly/ptRo50EOxlw

Art about art #3! Make sure to check out Chad Davidson's essay in 33.2 about puzzling, privilege, the pandemic, and Edwa...
05/05/2021

Art about art #3! Make sure to check out Chad Davidson's essay in 33.2 about puzzling, privilege, the pandemic, and Edward Hopper's Chop Suey.

"The painting, then, is also representative of institutionalized racism. There were tours, we know, at the turn of the century, which folks (white folks) could take of Chinatowns, ogling and tsk-tsking the brothels, opium dens, and chowchows. 'Dark tourism,' we call it now, 'ghetto tourism.' Approached that way, the women in the painting—and the Hoppers, who also frequented such places—were part of that grim, fashionably Bohemian privilege. Hopper may have been prized and prized himself for the way his paintings made interior complexity stunningly manifest. 'Great art,' Hopper once remarked, 'is the outward expression of an inner life in the artist.' But what’s arguably more important are the ways that great art (unwittingly or not) reveals the hidden values of an unjust system."

http://ow.ly/HdxX50EyYCA

More art about art in 33.2! From Marjorie Stelmach's "Bonnard: The Late Paintings":"Western tradition seemed exhausted:s...
04/30/2021

More art about art in 33.2! From Marjorie Stelmach's "Bonnard: The Late Paintings":

"Western tradition seemed exhausted:
still courting the viewer’s lingering gaze,
that false eternal moment.
Color could no longer be the whole of it.
What was time’s part? How did vision work?
Might radical laws of perspective yield
radical techniques? He dedicated years
to disrupting the givens, conducting
his experiments in capturing time’s blink."

https://www.gettysburgreview.com/store/#!/Volume-33-Number-2/p/308012109/category=20192291

NEW issue. NEW art.http://ow.ly/H31050E1Do4The Question, The Self III, and The Forgiven, by Kai-Samuels DavisKai Samuels...
03/19/2021

NEW issue. NEW art.
http://ow.ly/H31050E1Do4

The Question, The Self III, and The Forgiven, by Kai-Samuels Davis

Kai Samuels-Davis was born in New York and attended classes at the Woodstock School of Art at the age of sixteen, followed by a stint at the Art Students League of New York. In 2002, he received his BFA at State University of New York Purchase before moving to California, where he completed the graduate program in film at Art Center College of Design in 2006. Though not directly pursuing film, cinematic themes often arise in his paintings, which are composed mainly of portraits and figures focusing on introspective moments. He paints primarily with oils on wood, using a combination of brushes and metal and rubber scrapers to layer the paint, highlighting its history and texture and accentuating the balance between distraction and clarity. He has had solo exhibitions at Dolby Chadwick Gallery in San Francisco and the Cold Press Gallery in Holt, United Kingdom, and has been featured in group exhibitions at the Stanek Gallery, the Bolinas Museum, the Napa Valley Museum, the Windham Fine Art Gallery, Unit London, and elsewhere. A painting of his appears on the cover of Mary Oliver’s Felicity.

01/29/2021

Join us and our friends at @willowspringsmag for a free reading TONIGHT (January 29th) at 8 EST! Hope to see you there!

http://ow.ly/Pfq450DhSMr

Join us this Friday for a lit-filled evening featuring recent contributors to the GR and @WillowSprings! BYO- dog, couch...
01/26/2021

Join us this Friday for a lit-filled evening featuring recent contributors to the GR and @WillowSprings!

BYO- dog, couch, adult beverage, blankie, popcorn, etc. 🐶🍹🍿

http://ow.ly/wtUb50DhQdV

And yet. And yet.
12/15/2020

And yet. And yet.

Need more gift ideas? How about this delightful, classic black T for the poetry-reading, clove-smoking reader on your gi...
12/11/2020

Need more gift ideas? How about this delightful, classic black T for the poetry-reading, clove-smoking reader on your gift list?

http://ow.ly/MdGu50CGTLm

Looking for the perfect stocking stuffer for the annoying, literary elitist on your gift list? 👇👇http://ow.ly/CgUh50CFR6...
12/08/2020

Looking for the perfect stocking stuffer for the annoying, literary elitist on your gift list? 👇👇

http://ow.ly/CgUh50CFR6b

“I live in a centuries-old house whose slanted and warped floorboards occasionally cough up pieces of the past: tickets ...
12/01/2020

“I live in a centuries-old house whose slanted and warped floorboards occasionally cough up pieces of the past: tickets to a Fourth of July picnic from 1888, still bright green; a glass medicine bottle; a rusty fishhook with rope attached. Of course I save these; of course I become an archivist, a keeper of things.”

Learn more about Melissa Haley’s archival interests in “Memento Mori,” which can be found in 33.1!

http://ow.ly/eaV650CzoG3

Meet Clark, the hero of Kathy Flann’s “Lessons,” posed in the rear yard of their middle-of-the-row house in Lancaster, E...
11/17/2020

Meet Clark, the hero of Kathy Flann’s “Lessons,” posed in the rear yard of their middle-of-the-row house in Lancaster, England.

“At this point in our relationship, I had long since stopped distinguishing what I did for Clark from what I did for myself, and it wasn’t clear if the two could even be extracted from one another. I didn’t know if this was a good thing. I was supposed to feel this way about people, the guy I’d been seeing. Perhaps, this canine relationship was a continuation of the one I’d had with the terrier as a kid. He’d been the “person” who was always present, in every sense of the word. He possessed few expectations and zero skill for withholding parts of himself. Dogs are terrible at keeping secrets. They don’t even have pockets.

Imagining the way Clark would lounge on that back lawn, rolling around and snorting, and the way we’d play with that pink floppy Frisbee she loved—it was too good. It sent me to my calculator, to the scraped-out bottom of my bank account for a down payment on an extra £20,000 that I didn’t quite have. Sure, I could have bought a cheaper house, one with little light, positioned between warren-like streets where cars zoomed past, shaking the windows. But thinking of Clark in such a house, alone while I was at work, saddened me.”

http://ow.ly/SI4J50CneVX

Who's having a mice-hiding-in-the-walls kind of Sunday?
11/15/2020

Who's having a mice-hiding-in-the-walls kind of Sunday?

*GUEST POST* from Don Lago, who in his essay, "Hubble Vision," visits Marshfield, MO, birthplace of Edwin Hubble, where ...
11/13/2020

*GUEST POST* from Don Lago, who in his essay, "Hubble Vision," visits Marshfield, MO, birthplace of Edwin Hubble, where he tries to see the world through the telescope's eyes.

Below, Don's truck bumper.

"Taking the Blacksmith" features a gamer as she tackles un- and under-employment, misogyny, consumerism, the happiness i...
11/10/2020
“Taking the Blacksmith”

"Taking the Blacksmith" features a gamer as she tackles un- and under-employment, misogyny, consumerism, the happiness industrial complex, and other monsters.

Special thanks to Literary Hub for sharing this story!
https://lithub.com/taking-the-blacksmith/

DAY ONE In the game, we were high level and fierce, and we were nearing the blacksmith. The trees were dead or dying, the water pink with the blood of our enemies, the sky its familiar corpse-gray …

A bit of spookiness from the new issue!"That winter, I’d begun to notice vibrations below the house, deep in the earth, ...
10/31/2020

A bit of spookiness from the new issue!

"That winter, I’d begun to notice vibrations below the house, deep in the earth, thick, pulsing tremors. I listened and imagined the shapes that could make such grumbling—the bulbous heads, the muscular backs, the blind white eyes. I might never have heard them if it weren’t for the game, where the beasts were old and fat with authority, primacy. At the end of each match, they erupted from the ground to devour the losing team. Maybe they’d always been in the real world too, lurking under us, leaking saliva through serrated teeth. Once I’d noticed, I couldn’t stop noticing. As I pressed the buttons, moved the joystick to swivel the camera, the tremors shook the world of the game as well as my room, the walls I’d once painted pink, now faded and pale. . . . My fingers froze on the controller, and Tessa’s breath caught. She was so far away. We were all far away, and what would we do when the beasts broke through?"

—"Taking the Blacksmith," Julialicia Case

Get your hands on the new issue!Featuring PAINTINGS by Tollef Runquist, FICTION by Julialicia Case, Martha Shaffer, Kirs...
10/29/2020

Get your hands on the new issue!

Featuring PAINTINGS by Tollef Runquist, FICTION by Julialicia Case, Martha Shaffer, Kirsten Vail Aguilar, and Andrea Marcusa; ESSAYS by Elizabeth Kaye Cook, Kathy Flann, Don Lago, Christine Schott, Rebecca McClanahan, and Melissa Haley; POETRY by Christopher (c3) Crew, Peter Grandbois, Despy Boutris, Douglas Smith & George Looney, John Hazard, Brian Swann, Maura Stanton, Cindy King, John Brehm, Michael Waters, Richard Lyons, Steve Kistulentz, Shane Seely, Charles Rafferty, Chanda Feldman, Christopher Buckley, Ed Skoog, Brendan Galvin, Matthew Minicucci, Allison Hutchcraft, Fleda Brown, Gary Fincke, and Samyak Shertok.

http://ow.ly/IHVL50C6iKS

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Lotus Kay
“Beware the Ides of March.” John Burl Smith The Roman biographer Suetonius identifies the “seer” as a haruspex named Spurinna. His words prompted William Shakespeare to pin his famous play Julius Caesar, using the warning from the soothsayer regarding his assassination, “Beware the Ides of March.” Shakespeare’s dramatization, although millennials in the rearview mirror, reveals a great deal of clarity and truth. Today, looking back at the 1960s, when America lost some of its greatest leadership potential to assassination, most Americans today were not alive then, and those who were memory of those days have faded or become entangled with the dominant view pushed by popular media. Those accounts stripped away the corrosive, sarcastic and deadly atmosphere created by J. Edgar Hoover and other conservatives, as today’s conservative right-wingers portray the Capital insurrection back on January 6, 2021, as justified outrage. The loss deaths of Malcolm X, John and Robert Kennedy and finally Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr in the 1960s scorched brains and boggled the minds of those of us that live through those times. When I was a child “Beware the Ides of March,” Sounded like “Be aware of the eyes of March,” which to me meant to look forward to spring with hopefulness. The coming season followed the last signs of winter’s gray, which was stripped away by the winds of March, bringing freshness. The cleansing of March’s winds made way for the buds and greenery of new growth as part of the new season. Bringing hopefulness and new possibilities for all who survived the “hungry and desperate” days of winter’s scarcity, life began anew. Growing older and wiser, as well as having a clearer understanding of those words looking out at America today, I can see both statements as very appropriate metaphors for describing the political potential and reality of such an outcome. The upheaval caused by the “Capital insurrection on January 6 reflected the real possibility of Julius Caesar’s faith, as well as those past American leaders. Unlike Sen. Joe Manchin, I draw an entirely different lesson from the Capital insurrection and attempted coup, on the part of Donald Trump. Had insurrectionists succeeded we would be living in a totally different America, without law and Constitutional guarantees and subject to the whims of a dictator, Donald Trump, which may have been fine for Joe Manchin, given his current assessment of the insurrection. Looking back at the 1960s, my assessment of the assassinations of Malcolm and the Kennedys was America's losses painful and tragic, as a bystander. However, at the time, Dr. King’s assassination was very different because I was there in the midst of it all, and I have a close up and very personal connection to that event to share. Definitely not a sidewalk bystander, I spent the last 2 hour of Dr. King’s life talking with him, as he shared his hopes and plans, not only for the “Poor People’s Campaign,” but for America's future in general. Those last 120 or so minutes of Dr. King life, he spent talking with Charles Cabbage and me. His words began my winter of grayness, because following those events I felt the harsh and ascorbic criticism of civil rights leaders dead set against black power activists having any leadership role in the struggle descendants of American slavery faced. Civil rights leaders excoriated young black activists determined to lock them out of any role in determining the course of progress in the black community. Following the 1963 March on Washington, and the status quo accommodation civil leaders worked out with Pres. Pres. Kennedy, black power activists and other young voices were shut out of any leadership role by those Malcolm X called “The Big Six.” Young activists were labored and condemned as “a divisive and destructive force trying to destroy the black community.” It was the hollowness of the “1963 March on Washington” agreement and the lack of real progress that followed, which brought Dr. King back to Memphis following the march on March 28, 1968. When he left on the 29th, he promised to meet with the Invaders upon his return, which was on April 3, 1968. Dr. King joined the Invaders at The Lorraine Motel and shared his vision with Charles and I of the future he saw. He implored us to join his “Poor People’s Campaign. More importantly, Dr. King’s vision of the future ran counter to that of most civil rights leaders, which was encapsulated in his new dream, the “Poor People’s Campaign.” Relaying that vision, which began with bridging the divide between civil rights leaders and black power activists, he proposed bringing black power activists into leadership in the black community and wanted the Invaders to be the point in that effort. He had previously proposed his plan to civil rights leaders but they rejected Dr. King’s initiative. He told Charles and I in that last meeting, “This is why I have come to Memphis to talk with the Invaders hoping you would accept my offer and join the ‘Poor People’s Campaign.’ I need you to recruit other black power groups to join us, which would give me a broader base of support, dealing with politicians in Washington DC.” The Invaders accepting Dr. King's proposed alliance became J. Edgar Hoover’s worst nightmare, because it allowed Dr. King to break out of the box Hoover had entrapped him. The thing most people are unaware of is Dr. King’s new coalition included more than young black activists and some civil rights leaders, but young white activists, which allowed Dr. King to speak beyond the ghetto with a more powerful voice. I am convinced it was that agreement that prompted his assassination. What most Americans today do not understand is that Dr. King’s new coalition now included the anti-war activists. Dr. King had come out against the Vietnam War in 1964, which is when J. Edgar Hoover began attacking him as a communist. For the first time in American history a popular mainstream leader had pulled together young white and black activists in a progressive coalition. Fifty-three years later, America is back there once again, with a popular leader, working to advance the interest of poor and working class Americans based on a progressive coalition. This is a real threat to the Republican status quo, which is why Donald Trump engineered the insurrection at the Capital on January 6, which was intended to be a coup. Young people in America are poised on the precipice of political power in America, which is why assassination has become a real possibility once again for America’s current leadership. A popularly elected President is changing the political map in America because voters that elected him were from young people, which Republicans have no way to reverse. Today, the 18 to 25 demographic is made up of mostly first time voters and will continue growing every year. Combined with the 25 to 30 year old voting demographic Pres. Joe Biden has the potential to build an overwhelming vote coalition based on young activists. Pres. Biden has only to use the balance of power he is gathering to control future elections. The reality is older voters are presently evenly split between Republicans and Democrats. Moreover, elderly voters are passing on, leaving Republicans without a real replacement population of voters: hence all the voter suspension by Republican legislatures!!!! Republicans are hoping young voters stay home playing video games, chatting on social media not caring about their future and leave it up to them to decide. However, this does not mean Democrats can sit back and wait on attrition in order to maintain power, quite the contrary! Democrats must work harder than ever to bring young people into the political process. Young high school seniors should be Democrats' prime target. Gaining high school senior’s identification with their party as first time voters is the major task because statistics show first time voter identification tends to control their vote preference throughout their life. But more importantly, if Democrats are going to represent the future for Americans, it must bring in young people to their side by offering them leadership opportunities. Young voters must not be seen as only foot soldiers and grunt campaign workers. High seniors must be shown, they do not have to wait until they are in their thirties before they will get opportunities to make meaningful contributions and develop careers in politics regardless of their race or gender. More than anything, the green new deal must be seen as a means of creating a youth jobs program, not only summer jobs, but regular employment. Shakespeare’s dramatization of Julius Caesar and the foreshadowing by “Beware the Ides of March” warning is quite appropriate when one turns one’s eyes back to the 1960s, and compare what was at stake then as now. Corporate/political and other status quo interest will not go quietly into that good night. The Capital insurrection on January 6th show they will stop at nothing to hold on to power. The insurrection is not for Democrats, the blind Joe Manchin is trying to hide behind. It is not that his views are naive or misguided, they are very dangerous. Similarly, some Germans saw Adolf Halter as quant or dismissible, and never confronted the threat he represented. Germans are lucky to have the country they have today. Americans do not have to go down that road; they simply need to recognize racism, greed and the lust for power for what it is. Those who planned and financed the January 6th insurrectionists will not quit; they railed, plotted and struggled to hold on to their past of white supremacy that is their only choice or change. It was just such a time that produced the first Civil War, and there are those now who are so enamored of that time that in their heart of hearts they would do it all again. If there are any doubters, one needs only examine the events of the last 6 months and see January 6 as the tipping point. That day is no time to look the other way. True Americans must look it square in the face and see it as another day that must live in infamy in the minds and hearts of all true Americas.