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Montana The Magazine of Western History

Montana The Magazine of Western History Montana The Magazine of Western History showcases the people, places, and events that shaped the sta Published by the Montana Historical Society since 1951, Montana The Magazine of Western History showcases the people, places, and events that shaped the state and the western region.

In addition to fascinating articles, the magazine features book and movie reviews, commentaries, Montana episodes, and advertising confined to rare and new books, art objects, and other products and events related to American—especially Western—history. Published four times a year, the magazine is lavishly illustrated with historical maps, drawings, and photographs from the Society's own collectio

In addition to fascinating articles, the magazine features book and movie reviews, commentaries, Montana episodes, and advertising confined to rare and new books, art objects, and other products and events related to American—especially Western—history. Published four times a year, the magazine is lavishly illustrated with historical maps, drawings, and photographs from the Society's own collectio

Operating as usual

“Dear little nephew, when in a pumpkin your teeth are sunken, think of your old Aunt in Wisconsin.” Happy Thanksgiving E...
11/24/2022

“Dear little nephew, when in a pumpkin your teeth are sunken, think of your old Aunt in Wisconsin.” Happy Thanksgiving Everyone!
[Message from Ethel Scovell to Harold Robinson, MHS #PhotoArchives Postcard Collection]

Do you remember the 1950s television series “Sky King?”  Kirby Grant Hoon Jr., who was born in Butte on November 24, 191...
11/23/2022

Do you remember the 1950s television series “Sky King?” Kirby Grant Hoon Jr., who was born in Butte on November 24, 1911 and graduated from Helena High School in 1929, played wealthy Arizona rancher Schuyler King in the series. “Sky” fought bad guys and rescued people with his airplane while his niece Penny, who lived with him on the Flying Crown Ranch, was a sidekick on these adventures. Kirby was a pilot in real life and learned to fly during filming. File footage, especially of the plane flying, was often used numerous times, and sometimes reversed so that the plane appeared to fly in the opposite direction. On these occasions, observant fans could notice that the aircraft numbers would be backward. Seventy-two episodes aired on ABC in 1953 and 1954. CBS later rebroadcast the series. Kirby Grant did little acting after “Sky King.” He and his wife founded a ranch for orphaned or abandoned children, and he was honored at aviation events. On October 30, 1985, Kirby died in a traffic accident in Florida en route to the last successful launching of the space shuttle “Challenger.” Astronauts had planned to honor the Montana native for his encouragement of aviation and space flight. Pictured here (left to right) are Kirby Grant (Sky), Gloria Winters (Penny), and Ron Hagerthy (nephew Clipper). [Public domain Wikipedia. Text information from “More Montana Moments” written by Ellen Baumler.] #oldtvshows

Have you ever noticed that certain portions of our magazine are printed in full color while the other sections are black...
11/22/2022

Have you ever noticed that certain portions of our magazine are printed in full color while the other sections are black, white, and a spot color? This is because some of the page signatures are printed in five-color and others are printed in two-dot, with black and one color of ink. This is a way to highlight some color images by placing them in certain spots and also a way to save some money during the printing process which helps to keep subscription rates lower. Here is an example of a color photograph that ended up being black and white in the Autumn 2022 issue. The article fell into a two-dot signature section. [Photo by Tom Ferris, featured in “Fifty Years of Volunteers” by Michael Connolly showing MTHS volunteer coordinator Katie White and longtime volunteer Vicki Smith.]

The Montana Historical Society is seeking an Associate Editor to work on the quarterly “Montana The Magazine of Western ...
11/21/2022

The Montana Historical Society is seeking an Associate Editor to work on the quarterly “Montana The Magazine of Western History” and Montana Historical Society Press books. If you have a passion for Montana and Western History and meet the qualifications, this position might be for you! Application deadline: November 25, 2022 at midnight. To learn more and apply for this position (Editor 2 - 22143688) please visit the State of Montana Careers website:
https://statecareers.mt.gov/
#ReadMontana #mthist

It’s time for the Brawl of the Wild and history is really being made this year with the presence of College GameDay . Wh...
11/17/2022

It’s time for the Brawl of the Wild and history is really being made this year with the presence of College GameDay . Who do you root for? “Like” one of the pictures and share to boost the score!
#BrawloftheWild #montanafootball 406 Sports #catgriz #grizcat
#BigSkyFB #BigSkyConf

Go western and give the gift of history to everyone who wants to #ReadMontana this year.  Call 406/444-4708, subscribe o...
11/16/2022

Go western and give the gift of history to everyone who wants to #ReadMontana this year. Call 406/444-4708, subscribe online, or find a mail-in form here: https://mhs.mt.gov/pubs/Subscribe

[Image of Renẻe Laegreid with her horse Jake]
#MadeinMontana #MontanaMade #MTHist #Montana

You can organize and protect your “Montana” collection in these handsome slipcases covered with durable maroon leatheret...
11/15/2022

You can organize and protect your “Montana” collection in these handsome slipcases covered with durable maroon leatherette. A custom magazine logo label is included. The box measures 11-3/8” tall x 8-5/8” deep x 3-1/8” wide. Price is $28 each plus shipping/handling. Rate varies with quantity and destination. Email tryan (at) mt.gov or call (406) 444-4708 to order.

Award-winning news!
11/14/2022

Award-winning news!

Congratulations Steph Lehmann for winning a Will Rogers Gold Medallion Award for writing and illustrating "Montana History for Kids in 50 Objects: With 50 Fun Activities!"
https://www.einpresswire.com/article/599347977/will-rogers-gold-medallions-announced?fbclid=IwAR08yPPW7p_B716_HaMFKrKDQI0BO7crho29OycwVGBJ-Mu8VDDgLHMPXxA It is available from Farcountry Press or wherever books are sold. https://www.farcountrypress.com/details.php?id=932https://www.farcountrypress.com/details.php?id=932

Although the three barns on the historic William Ford Ranch are excellent examples of an early-twentieth-century model d...
11/13/2022

Although the three barns on the historic William Ford Ranch are excellent examples of an early-twentieth-century model dairy operation, they housed dairy cows for only a few years, from 1914 to 1917. Ohio businessmen William Ford and Judge Howard K. Hollister purchased the Shelton Ranch in the Bitterroot Valley in 1914 at the insistence of their sons, who were wooed to the West by land promoters, the breathtaking scenery, and the promise of a quieter life away from the city. After the death of Hollister, and Ford after that, the ranch was eventually sold and the name changed to Chief Joseph Ranch in the 1960s. The location has been used as a guest ranch and is also where some filming has occurred for Paramount’s “Yellowstone” series. [Source of information: “Hand Raised: The Barns of Montana” by Chere Jiusto and Christine Brown, photograph by Tom Ferris] #ReadMontana #MTHist #DuttonRanch #YellowstoneTV

If you receive the magazine, you might recall this article from Spring 2021 on “Fort Peck’s Finest: The 163rd Infantry’s...
11/11/2022

If you receive the magazine, you might recall this article from Spring 2021 on “Fort Peck’s Finest: The 163rd Infantry’s Assiniboine and Sioux Soldiers in World War II” by Elise Boxer. Company B of the 163rd Infantry Regiment, 41st Infantry Division (pictured here), was critical to Allied victories in Papua New Guinea and elsewhere in the Pacific during World War II. The majority of Company B were Assiniboine and Sioux National Guardsmen from Montana’s Fort Peck Indian Reservation, whose bonds of friendship, kinship, and cultural identity united them. Making up the regimental color guard in this photo are (left to right) Corporal Red Thunder, Sergeant Skarie, Sergeant Hamilton, and Corporal Red Elk, Fort Lewis, Washington, ca. 1941. #VeteransDay #WWII #163rd

Residents of Darby, Montana, recognize 1889 as the official year their settlement became a town. The previous year, resi...
11/09/2022

Residents of Darby, Montana, recognize 1889 as the official year their settlement became a town. The previous year, residents had submitted an application to the federal Post Office Department under the community name Harrison, after the newly elected president, Benjamin Harrison. However, since a "Harrison, Montana" already existed, post office officials renamed the town after James W. Darby, who had signed the application. Darby served as the terminal point for the Northern Pacific’s Bitterroot Valley branch line. Today, about 800 people call Darby home and is the home of the Chief Joseph Ranch where Paramount Studios' "Yellowstone" is filmed.
Elevation: 3,882 ft. Location: Ravalli County Latitude 46.02278137 Longitude -114.1772232
[Image: Mainstreet of Darby, pre-1910, courtesy of the University of Montana Mansfield Library 94.3475]
Source: https://app.mt.gov/shop/mhsstore/montana-place-names-from-alzada-to-zortman-10
#ReadMontana
#DarbyMontana
#YellowstoneTV
#YellowstoneFans

These two statehood paintings valorize government procedures, acknowledge the triumph of law over frontier conditions, a...
11/08/2022

These two statehood paintings valorize government procedures, acknowledge the triumph of law over frontier conditions, and celebrate the coming of age of Montana after a long and painful struggle. The signing of the Enabling Act on February 22, 1889, “enabled” Montana to become a state once the requirements for a state constitution were satisfied. In the first picture, Secretary of State Thomas F. Bayard hands the bill to outgoing president Grover Cleveland as Joseph K.Toole, in his role of territorial delegate, looks on. Those requirements having been met, the second picture shows President Benjamin Harrison signing the proclamation declaring Montana a state on November 8, 1889, in the presence of Secretary of State James G. Blaine.
Source: “Montana’s State Capitol: The People’s House” book by Lambert, Burnham, and Near.
[F. Pedretti’s Sons. “Signing of the Enabling Act” and “Signing the Proclamation of Statehood,” 1902. Oil on canvas, 84"×48". Old Supreme Court Chamber. PHOTOGRAPHS BY JOHN REDDY] #ThisDayinHistory #mthist

On October 11, 1883, a little over a month after the Northern Pacific Railway completed its transcontinental line, deleg...
11/06/2022

On October 11, 1883, a little over a month after the Northern Pacific Railway completed its transcontinental line, delegates from railroad companies across the country met at the General Time Convention and established the Standard Time System. They divided the country into five time zones, each one hour ahead of the zone to its west. Standard Time was instituted on November 18, 1883, and eventually adopted voluntarily by most cities nationwide. This watch belonged to John H. Voorhies, who was a railroad conductor for the NPR in Glendive at the turn of the century. He used it to ensure that trains ran on time—a necessity for both safety and efficiency. [MTHS Collection, Gift of J. Max Voorhies, X1971.26.01] Information source: https://app.mt.gov/shop/mhsstore/a-history-of-montana-in-101-objects-artifacts-essays-from-the-montana-historical-society
#FallBack #DaylightSavingsTime

Here’s a view from Jackson Street in Virginia City, Montana, in 1866. In the winter of 1863–1864, an outbreak of extrale...
11/04/2022

Here’s a view from Jackson Street in Virginia City, Montana, in 1866. In the winter of 1863–1864, an outbreak of extralegal violence erupted in Virginia City and Bannack as merchants organized a vigilance committee to target alleged bandits. The vigilantes drew from deep experience with extralegal violence in California, Kansas, Nebraska, and Colorado in their campaign, and killed twenty-one men, justifying their acts by claiming it was in the defense of their property interests.
Source: “Apostles of Disorder: Montana Merchants, Vigilantes, and the Interconnectivity of Extralegal Violence” by Patrick T. Hoehn in Autumn 2022 “Montana The Magazine of Western History.” Not a subscriber? Here’s how to sign up: https://mhs.mt.gov/pubs/Subscribe
[Sutterley Brothers, 1866. 956-305, MTHS #PhotoArchives]
#FotoFriday #PhotoFriday #MTHist

In 1881, a white mob marched on a group of Chinese woodcutters at a logging camp south of Butte, attempting to drive the...
11/02/2022

In 1881, a white mob marched on a group of Chinese woodcutters at a logging camp south of Butte, attempting to drive them from the area. Timely intervention by Constable Edmund T. Owen forestalled violence, and the leader of the mob faced trial. In order to feed Butte’s massive demand for cordwood and lumber, woodcutters worked the forests around the mining city, including this group harvesting timber for the Colorado and Montana Smelter. Despite low wages, competition for these jobs could be fierce.
Source: Article by Mark T. Johnson in the Autumn 2022 “Montana The Magazine of Western History” on Montana’s Chinese Woodchoppers and Their Unlikely Allies, 1880-1900.
Want to subscribe? Here’s how: https://mhs.mt.gov/pubs/Subscribe
[Image on title page: C. Owen Smithers Photograph Collection 10.008.01. Courtesy Butte-Silver Bow Public Archives, Butte, MT]

The Montana Historical Society is seeking an Associate Editor to work on the quarterly “Montana The Magazine of Western ...
11/02/2022

The Montana Historical Society is seeking an Associate Editor to work on the quarterly “Montana The Magazine of Western History” and Montana Historical Society Press books. If you have a passion for Montana and Western History and meet the qualifications, this position might be for you! Application deadline: November 25, 2022 at midnight. To learn more and apply for this position (Editor 2 - 22143688) please visit the State of Montana Careers website:
https://statecareers.mt.gov/
#ReadMontana #mthist

Do skulls and crossbones remind you of Halloween?  Carved out of wood by Father Anthony Ravalli about 1870, this sculptu...
10/31/2022

Do skulls and crossbones remind you of Halloween? Carved out of wood by Father Anthony Ravalli about 1870, this sculpture was made for a far different purpose. Representative of an artistic convention dating back to the Middle Ages known as “memento mori,” it served as a reminder to viewers that death was inevitable but adherence to Christian principles in this life ensured Paradise in the next.
Source of information: https://app.mt.gov/shop/mhsstore/a-history-of-montana-in-101-objects-artifacts-essays-from-the-montana-historical-society
[MTHS Museum X1904.02.10]

Sue Chessman rests a soothing hand on her cat while Mr. Taylor and his assistant take a photograph in front of the Chess...
10/29/2022

Sue Chessman rests a soothing hand on her cat while Mr. Taylor and his assistant take a photograph in front of the Chessman home (now the Original Governor’s Mansion) in Helena. Mrs. W. A. Chessman (left) and Penelope Cuthbert watch from the porch. [MTHS #PhotoArchives, Taylor Studio, 980-454] Happy #NationalCatDay!

Scobey’s 1925 professional baseball team included batboy Charles Smith, Porky Dallas, Wally Hilden, Honey Guyer, Delno C...
10/28/2022

Scobey’s 1925 professional baseball team included batboy Charles Smith, Porky Dallas, Wally Hilden, Honey Guyer, Delno Cottingham, Happy Felsch, George Eastman, Joe Lupe, Johnny Meyers, Steve Mattick, and Swede Risberg.
Source: “Scobey’s Touring Pros: Wheat, Baseball, and Illicit Booze” written by Gary Lucht (Summer 1970 "Montana The Magazine of Western History")
[MHS #PhotoArchives 950-885]
#WorldSeries #FotoFriday #PhotoFriday #easternMontana

Thirty of the Yellowstone-Western Stage Company’s drivers and staff pose with their coaches for a group portrait near Ca...
10/28/2022

Thirty of the Yellowstone-Western Stage Company’s drivers and staff pose with their coaches for a group portrait near Canyon in Yellowstone National Park, ca. 1914. The lease required that the company’s drivers be capable, friendly, and sober, and the drivers acted as tour guides in addition to caring for their horse teams and coaches.
Source: Autumn 2022 “Montana The Magazine of Western History” article on F. J. Haynes written by Kathryn McKee. Want a magazine subscription? Here's how: https://mhs.mt.gov/pubs/Subscribe
[Elliott W. Hunter, photographer. H-05517, MTHS #PhotoArchives]
#FotoFriday #PhotoFriday

Charles Marion Russell passed away on October 24, 1926 at the age of sixty-two. Some months before, he had surgery and t...
10/24/2022

Charles Marion Russell passed away on October 24, 1926 at the age of sixty-two. Some months before, he had surgery and told his wife that when the end came, he wanted to be transported to the cemetery behind horses. Russell hated automobiles and never learned to drive. He called them "skunkwagons" and wanted none of that for his last ride. He came through the surgery fine but suffered a fatal heart attack some months later. To honor his wishes, his wife, Nancy, located a horse-drawn hearse in Cascade that had been in storage for fifteen years. The hearse carried Russell's remains to Highland Cemetery while his saddled but riderless horse followed. It was a fitting farewell to a beloved Montanan. The hearse went back into storage until 1946 when Charles Bovey, who was collecting artifacts for his tourist operation at Virginia City, purchased it. It again lay in storage at Nevada City until the Bovey estate donated it to the C. M. Russell Museum in Great Falls, where it is on display. Here’s a photograph of the horse-drawn hearse parked in front of the Russell home and log studio. [MHS #PhotoArchives Lot 9.1.7.02]

Do you grow apples? Here’s a 1910 agricultural fair display at the Western Montana Apple Show in Missoula with boxes of ...
10/21/2022

Do you grow apples? Here’s a 1910 agricultural fair display at the Western Montana Apple Show in Missoula with boxes of apples in a tent. Notice a large sign advertising the Chamber of Commerce centered over the display and the star-spangled bunting adorning various parts of the tent. Additional advertising for the Missoula Light and Water Company is also visible.
[MHS #PhotoArchives, photographer R. H. McKay, Lot 032 B4F12.3] #NationalAppleDay #NationalAppleMonth

This presentation is happening later today.
10/20/2022

This presentation is happening later today.

Montana’s Chinese immigrants played an important role in the West’s economic development. Join University of Notre Dame associate professor Mark Johnson, Thursday, Oct. 20 at 4:30 p.m. at the Montana Historical Society for a discussion and book signing. His book, The Middle Kingdom under the Big Sky, examines the experiences of Montana’s Chinese residents: the pressures they faced, how they advocated for their rights, and how they fought to keep their culture alive in an often-hostile environment.

More detail at https://mhs.mt.gov/education/index1.

Photo credit: Joe, a cook at Ming’s Restaurant, Helena. MTHS Photo Archives, 957-619.

https://mtmemory.recollectcms.com/nodes/view/76111

#MTHistory #mtnews #montanamuseum @MTHist #mthist

“The War of the Woods: Montana’s Chinese Woodchoppers and Their Unlikely Allies, 1880-1900” was published in the Autumn ...
10/19/2022

“The War of the Woods: Montana’s Chinese Woodchoppers and Their Unlikely Allies, 1880-1900” was published in the Autumn 2022 issue and written by Mark T. Johnson. He is an associate professor with the University of Notre Dame’s Institute for Educational Initiatives and author of the recent book “The Middle Kingdom under the Big Sky: A History of the Chinese Experience in Montana” (Univ. of Nebraska Press, 2022), Johnson’s research focuses on telling the history of Chinese communities in Montana in their own words and through a global lens. A native of Montana, Johnson grew up in Great Falls and lives in Helena. Here he is holding the magazine, sitting near the Lewis and Clark Library on Helena’s walking mall, close to what used to be Helena’s Chinatown neighborhood. For more information on the Chinese experience in Montana, visit BigSkyChinese.com.
#ReadMontana

A series of earthquakes rocked Helena in October and November 1935, with the largest one occurring on October 18th.  It ...
10/17/2022

A series of earthquakes rocked Helena in October and November 1935, with the largest one occurring on October 18th. It struck just before 10 p.m. causing significant damage to many buildings with some entirely destroyed including approximately 300 homes. Lights, power, and telephone service were also interrupted causing further terror, making it difficult for doctors attempting to treat the injured. Here is a view of large buildings at the newly constructed Helena High School (present-day Helena Middle School) that partially collapsed. [MHS #PhotoArchives, photographer Arthur Edward Onsum, PAc 2001-14.018] #earthquake #mtnews

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I'm wondering if anyone has information or picture(s) of a National Humane Alliance Fountain that I believe was given to Anaconda. It was one of approximately 150 fountains similar to the one pictured given to communities all across the U.S. and beyond by the National Humane Alliance from about 1902 to 1915. I have found some evidence that a fountain was given and possibly installed at Anaconda. Many communities received the fountains and then either moved them or discarded them because of changing traffic patterns. To date, I have been able to compile data and pictures on most of the fountains which can be found at http://electronicvalley.org/derby/quiz/pages/wateringtrough.htm as well as on an interactive Google map https://www.google.com/maps/d/viewer?mid=1NW8lnCl1lpM6uJai9jkOfmDYVfE&ll=38.70519172284092%2C-98.86504629030367&z=4 and I would like to be able to update the information with whatever you might have about the fountain in Anaconda or could direct me to someone who might know.
Wow!! We just received word that Bleeding Spirits: A Combat Soldier’s Memoir of the Vietnam War (1968-1969) was listed by Aaron Parrett as the standout military history book of 2020 in your Montana The Magazine of Western History‘s Montana Book Roundup! We had the honor of serving as editor for this book — a post-humously published memoir written by Robert Jewell. Among Bob’s greatest wishes prior to succumbing to mesothelioma in 2017 was to get his story out to people — “for both himself and the world he left behind — in the hopes that it might be of help to his family, friends, and so many others who struggle with PTSD/PTSS and the aftermath of war. Thank you so much for including mention of Bob's book in your wonderful magazine!
A great story from Buses of Yellowstone Preservation Trust, a non-profit all volunteer organization located in Red Lodge, Montana whose mission is to restore and preserve original operating vehicles used in Yellowstone National Park prior to World War II. Bus 401, a 1937 Model 706 Bus, is owned and preserved by the Trust. Here's her story.... If she could tell her story, it would read “I came to be on April 29, 1937 at the White Motor Company in Cleveland, Ohio. I was number 12 of the 40 Model 706 buses built for the Yellowstone Park Transportation Company (YPTCo.) that year; one of the 98 Model 706 buses added to YPTCo’s fleet between 1936-1939. I was given a number of “401” which I proudly displayed as I worked throughout Yellowstone National Park from 1937 through 1960. In 1960, I was purchased by a family from Bozeman and my insides turned into somewhat of a “camper” that would be used by the family on planned trips to Alaska. In 1965, I was parked in their barn and remained there until 2011 when I was purchased by the Buses of Yellowstone Preservation Trust. With the Buses’ commitment and dedication to preserving what once was, they brought me back to the era I was born to run. I may be 83 years old, but I still have gas in my tank, a spark in my plugs, I’m click’n on all six cylinders, and heads still turn when I “sashay” on by!”
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BI7YDY8YWnU A new 4-minute Song and Video about the great Fairbanks Alaska and Klondike Gold Rush! You will enjoy it if you love gold mining and the history of the West.... A drunk gold miner faces a card cheat in the Horseshoe Saloon...
Question: Years ago, perhaps in the 1990s, I read an article in Montana, written by a Native American author, that discussed public interpretation at western forts that are now historic sites or museums. In particular I remember his point that at many fort museums the exhibits and interpretation talk about things like what the soldiers did in their free time and cooking demonstrations, and not why the fort was there in the first place--to take Native land. What was that article? Does anyone know what I am looking for?
This Holiday Season, we are counting our blessings and working to make Montana count! Please join our team, and help us with the 2020 Census to ensure we receive enough federal funding for Montana’s roads, schools, and hospitals. We are paying $17.00 – $21.50 per hour and reimburse mileage at the highest federal rate. Our hours are flexible, and we welcome applicants with no previous experience. Hundreds of jobs are available! You can apply today at 2020census.gov/jobs Help your friends and family by sharing this post!
This Holiday Season, we are counting our blessings and working to make Montana count! Please join our team, and help us with the 2020 Census to ensure we receive enough federal funding for Montana’s roads, schools, and hospitals. We are paying $17.00 – $21.50 per hour and reimburse mileage at the highest federal rate. Our hours are flexible, and we welcome applicants with no previous experience. Hundreds of jobs are available! You can apply today at 2020census.gov/jobs Help your friends and family by sharing this post!
My ex-wife is a Lakota Sioux from south Dakota and Montana. My children stated with me. They want to go west to see there for father's land..
Buried in Great Falls,Mt.
Some thing about Montana, I'd like to explore it more and more, a friend sends pictures I've been there twice in 68 years of life. And it still calls me.
I love the state, the beauty of it, I want to go there and fish.
Flaming Arrow Court postcard
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