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AP Stylebook

AP Stylebook The AP Stylebook and Briefing on Media Law is an essential handbook for all writers and editors. The AP Stylebook and Briefing on Media Law is an essential handbook for all writers, editors, students and public relations specialists.

* The spiral-bound 2016 edition of The Associated Press Stylebook and Briefing on Media Law includes nearly 250 new or revised entries – including lowercase internet and web – and the first interior page redesign in decades.

At about 600 pages, the AP Stylebook is widely used as a writing and editing reference in newsrooms, classrooms and corporate offices worldwide. Updated regularly since its initial publication in 1953, the AP Stylebook provides fundamental guidelines for spelling, language, punctuation, usage and journalistic style. It is the definitive resource for journalists.

* AP Stylebook Online is a Web-bas

At about 600 pages, the AP Stylebook is widely used as a writing and editing reference in newsrooms, classrooms and corporate offices worldwide. Updated regularly since its initial publication in 1953, the AP Stylebook provides fundamental guidelines for spelling, language, punctuation, usage and journalistic style. It is the definitive resource for journalists.

* AP Stylebook Online is a Web-bas

Operating as usual

Mignon Fogarty, author of "Grammar Girl's Quick and Dirty Tips for Better Writing," says:"The AP's real-world journalism...
08/09/2022

Mignon Fogarty, author of "Grammar Girl's Quick and Dirty Tips for Better Writing," says:
"The AP's real-world journalism expertise infuses the Stylebook with practical, useful and up-to-date guidance. It's by my side as I write every day."
Be like @grammargirl and order yours!

08/09/2022

We use a slash, rather than a hyphen, for constructions such as and/or, either/or, over/under, red state/blue state, etc. No space on either side of the slash.
To break up lines of a verse, use a slash with a space on each side:
Row, row, row your boat / Gently down the stream

08/08/2022

To avoid any suggestion that someone is being judged before a trial, do not use a phrase such as "sued for malfeasance." Instead, say the lawsuit "accuses her of malfeasance" or "he was named in a lawsuit accusing him of libel."

08/05/2022

Noisome means offensive, noxious. Noisy means clamorous.

08/04/2022

Use an s without an apostrophe to indicate spans of decades or centuries: the 1890s, the 1800s.
Years are an exception to the general AP style rule that a figure is not used to start a sentence: 2020 was a difficult year.

Capitalize U.S. Supreme Court and also the Supreme Court when the context makes the U.S. designation unnecessary.For exa...
08/03/2022

Capitalize U.S. Supreme Court and also the Supreme Court when the context makes the U.S. designation unnecessary.
For example: The U.S. Supreme Court will be back in session in October. The Supreme Court is in recess.

http://apne.ws/zGGFENW

08/01/2022

Our guidance: The uppercase Deaf is acceptable, if used by a person or group, in descriptions such as the cultural Deaf community, Deaf education, Deaf culture, etc. When relevant, we use lowercase deaf for the audiological condition and for people with that condition.

07/28/2022

We prefer the word people to persons. For example: Thousands of people attended the fair. There were 17 people in the room. When relevant, use more specific wording. For example: U.S. adults; likely voters in Ghana’s presidential election; Chinese American college students.

A bear market is a period of generally declining stock prices over a prolonged period, generally defined as a 20% or lar...
07/27/2022

A bear market is a period of generally declining stock prices over a prolonged period, generally defined as a 20% or larger decline in broad stock indexes such as the S&P 500.

Our AP Stylebook Online Topical Guide about the financial markets:
http://apne.ws/l2Eocj3

07/26/2022

Growing numbers of people use they/them/their as a gender-neutral singular personal pronoun. As much as possible, AP also uses they/them/their as a way of accurately describing and representing a person who uses those pronouns for themself.

If you are a college instructor and require the AP Stylebook for your class, we offer both the print book and Stylebook ...
07/26/2022

If you are a college instructor and require the AP Stylebook for your class, we offer both the print book and Stylebook Online to support your teaching.
Request your preferred resource now: http://apne.ws/OsUoULe

07/25/2022

For times, we use figures except for noon and midnight: 11 a.m. Use a colon to separate hours from minutes: 3:30 p.m. Avoid such redundancies as 10 a.m. this morning, 10 p.m. tonight or 10 p.m. Monday night. Use 10 a.m. Monday, etc.

07/22/2022

Our style: OK, OK'd, OK'ing, OKs. We don't use okay. As for the postal code OK, we use postal codes only in complete addresses that include the ZIP code. Otherwise, Okla. for the abbreviation in datelines. Spell out Oklahoma and other state names in stories. OK?

07/21/2022

Cliches are the junk food of the literary pantry, much loved by lazy writers. But platitudes and worn phrases serve as signals to the reader to move along, there’s nothing to see here.
Don’t push readers away, or lull them to sleep. Engage them with original, specific phrasing.

07/21/2022
Associated Press Stylebook

We share daily AP style tips here and some of them generate a lot of conversation.
Check out some of our tweets that have gotten the most engagement:
http://apne.ws/Gd0GoJz

We don't use the terms illegal immigrant, unauthorized immigrant, irregular migrant, alien, an illegal, illegals or undocumented (except when quoting people or documents that use these terms). Many immigrants and migrants have some sort of documents, but not the necessary ones.

Our AP Stylebook Online Topical Guide about the financial markets provides guidance for writing about the stock market a...
07/20/2022

Our AP Stylebook Online Topical Guide about the financial markets provides guidance for writing about the stock market and the economy.
Inflation is one term you'll find in the guide, which is available to all users here:
http://apne.ws/fDihdX8

07/19/2022

Disabled people are not monolithic. They use diverse terms to describe themselves. Many, for example, use the term people with disabilities. Both people with disabilities and disabled people are acceptable terms, but try to determine the preference of a person or group.

What's new in the AP Stylebook, 56th Edition?- An inclusive storytelling chapter.- An expanded religion chapter.- A revi...
07/19/2022

What's new in the AP Stylebook, 56th Edition?
- An inclusive storytelling chapter.
- An expanded religion chapter.
- A revised social media chapter.
- New guidance on writing about disabilities.
- Expanded guidance on cannabis.
And much more.
Buy yours: http://apne.ws/Nt5nJCv

07/18/2022

We don't use the word cocktail in reference to a mixture of drugs. Instead: drug combination or simply drugs or medications. For example, HIV drugs or execution drugs.

Buy the new AP Stylebook, 56th Edition, on apstylebook.com and you get a valuable bonus:You can sign up for emails when ...
07/14/2022

Buy the new AP Stylebook, 56th Edition, on apstylebook.com and you get a valuable bonus:
You can sign up for emails when our editors add or update our guidance on AP Stylebook Online.

07/14/2022

We use the spelling "flyer" for a person flying in an aircraft, and for handbills: He used his frequent flyer miles; they put up flyers announcing the show. We use "flier" in the phrase "take a flier," meaning to take a big risk.

The Stylebook's weapons entry offers guidance on terms including semi-automatic rifle, assault rifle, assault weapon, mi...
07/13/2022

The Stylebook's weapons entry offers guidance on terms including semi-automatic rifle, assault rifle, assault weapon, military-style rifle and modern sporting rifle.

07/12/2022

Flair is conspicuous talent or style.
Flare is a verb meaning to blaze with sudden, bright light, to burst out in anger, or to curve or spread outward. It is also a noun meaning a flame.

07/11/2022

Generally, use a hyphen in modifiers of three or more words: a know-it-all attitude, black-and-white photography, a sink-or-swim moment, a win-at-all-costs approach. Consider carefully, though, before deciding to use more than three modifiers.

07/11/2022
Associated Press Stylebook

Are you deciding if this is the year you switch from the print AP Stylebook to our searchable, customizable AP Stylebook Online?
Request a 14-day free trial to see all the added features and functionality of Stylebook Online:
http://apne.ws/B49Wrud

At the end of your free trial, we will ask you if you would like to continue your service so you can keep any of the custom entries you created on Stylebook Online. We hope you will find the service valuable enough that you won't want to give up the help staying in style.

07/07/2022

We capitalize formal titles used directly before a name: Mayor Jo Hays. Lowercase a title when standing alone: The mayor rides a bike to work. Also lowercase titles in constructions that set them off from a name by commas: The mayor, Jo Hays, rides a bike to work.

Do you sometimes lose track of what's new in language?Subscribe to AP Stylebook Online and we'll email you when our edit...
07/07/2022
AP Stylebook

Do you sometimes lose track of what's new in language?
Subscribe to AP Stylebook Online and we'll email you when our editors add or change AP style guidance.
You can also check "recent updates" on your dashboard to see what's new.
We're here to help.
http://apne.ws/ZtBTgnn

The AP Stylebook print edition, web-based access and style-checking software.

Use this style of uppercase and lowercase for amendments to the U.S. Constitution: the First Amendment guarantee of free...
07/06/2022

Use this style of uppercase and lowercase for amendments to the U.S. Constitution: the First Amendment guarantee of free speech, the Eighth Amendment prohibition on cruel and unusual punishment.

07/05/2022

Avoid the word casualties, which can refer to either injuries or deaths. If authorities use it, seek specifics. If specifics aren’t available, say so: Officer Riya Kumar said the crash resulted in casualties, but she said she did not know whether those were injuries or deaths.

If you know just where to find what you need in your print Stylebook, but you also want the latest in AP style: When you...
07/05/2022

If you know just where to find what you need in your print Stylebook, but you also want the latest in AP style: When you buy your spiral-bound AP Stylebook on apstylebook.com, you can sign up for our update emails when Stylebook editors add or change guidance.
http://apne.ws/hW1lkDw

07/01/2022

We have a new Stylebook Online entry: Czechia, the Czech Republic.
Both are acceptable. The shorter name Czechia is preferred by the Czech government. If using Czechia, clarify in the story that the country is more widely known in English as the Czech Republic.

06/30/2022

Hyphenate up-to-date as a compound modifier before a noun: We bring you the most up-to-date news. Otherwise, no hyphen: Stay up to date with Stylebook Online. My calendar is up to date.

When you have a question about writing or editing, turn to the AP Stylebook Online search function.You will often get mu...
06/30/2022
AP Stylebook

When you have a question about writing or editing, turn to the AP Stylebook Online search function.
You will often get multiple related results. Check out a few to see if you get more context on your question.
Learn more about Stylebook Online:
http://apne.ws/0G8Tity

The AP Stylebook print edition, web-based access and style-checking software.

We now have an entry called “marijuana, cannabis.” It includes definitions for cannabinoids, decriminalization, delta, e...
06/29/2022

We now have an entry called “marijuana, cannabis.”
It includes definitions for cannabinoids, decriminalization, delta, edibles, hemp and 420, among other related terms.
You can find this in the new AP Stylebook, 56th Edition, and on AP Stylebook Online.

06/28/2022

We don't use the terms illegal immigrant, unauthorized immigrant, irregular migrant, alien, an illegal, illegals or undocumented (except when quoting people or documents that use these terms). Many immigrants and migrants have some sort of documents, but not the necessary ones.

Acceptable variations include living in or entering a country illegally or without legal permission. For people: immigrants lacking permanent legal status. The European Union and some U.N. agencies use the term irregular migration; that term is acceptable in areas where it is commonly used. Do not use irregular migrants.

When space is a consideration, such as in a headline, simply migrant(s) or immigrant(s) is acceptable as long as the context is clear in the first few paragraphs of the story.

If you want the helpful spiral binding so your print Stylebook stays open to the page you need, the only place to buy th...
06/28/2022

If you want the helpful spiral binding so your print Stylebook stays open to the page you need, the only place to buy the new AP Stylebook, 56th Edition, is on apstylebook.com.

06/27/2022

Use spongy moth for the invasive pest formerly known as gypsy moth, a change approved by the Entomological Society of America in 2022. Gypsy moth is acceptable in a first reference explaining the new name until it becomes better known: spongy moths, formerly known as gypsy moths.

06/23/2022

From our race-related coverage entry: In all coverage ... strive to accurately represent the world, or a particular community, and its diversity through the people you quote and depict in all formats. Omissions and lack of inclusion can render people invisible.

AP Stylebook Online subscribers love our search function.You can look for exactly what you need without knowing what ent...
06/23/2022
AP Stylebook

AP Stylebook Online subscribers love our search function.
You can look for exactly what you need without knowing what entry or chapter your answer is in.
You might even find AP style rules you didn't know existed.
Learn more about Stylebook Online:
http://apne.ws/3nSwwja

The AP Stylebook print edition, web-based access and style-checking software.

We have expanded and updated our guidance on writing about disabilities.You can find this new entry on the terms brain i...
06/22/2022

We have expanded and updated our guidance on writing about disabilities.
You can find this new entry on the terms brain injury, traumatic brain injury, brain damage and brain-damaged on AP Stylebook Online and in the new AP Stylebook, 56th Edition.

06/21/2022

Lowercase and spell out titles in constructions that set them off from a name by commas: The U.S. vice president, Kamala Harris, was elected in 2020. Pope Francis, the current pope, was born in Argentina.

Ask the Editor is one of the most popular features of AP Stylebook Online.Editor Paula Froke responds to a wide range of...
06/20/2022
Associated Press Stylebook

Ask the Editor is one of the most popular features of AP Stylebook Online.
Editor Paula Froke responds to a wide range of questions from Stylebook Online subscribers.
Check out highlights of some recent replies:
http://apne.ws/XRc46dV

Ask the Editor is a forum on writing, style and phrasing issues that go beyond the pages of the AP Stylebook. AP Stylebook editor Paula Froke fields questions posed by subscribers to AP Stylebook Online. Below is a sampling of recent questions Paula has answered.

06/17/2022

Sunday is Juneteenth, the traditional June 19 commemoration date of the emancipation of enslaved people in the U.S. On June 17, 2021, President Biden signed legislation making it a U.S. federal holiday. The holiday also has been called Juneteenth Independence Day or Freedom Day.

Do you love the feel of using a print AP Stylebook?Do you want to stay up to date as our editors add and update guidance...
06/17/2022

Do you love the feel of using a print AP Stylebook?
Do you want to stay up to date as our editors add and update guidance on AP Stylebook Online?
You don't have to choose! Buy a spiral-bound Stylebook and you can get update emails when AP style changes.
http://apne.ws/BJqDp91

06/16/2022

Our inclusive storytelling chapter says: People of any race are capable of racist behavior and assumptions (both explicit and implicit). Both women and men are capable of sexist assumptions. Older adults may view younger people through a lens of ageism, as well as vice versa.

Avoid the terms child-free and childless other than in direct quotes essential to the story. They may be viewed as loade...
06/15/2022

Avoid the terms child-free and childless other than in direct quotes essential to the story. They may be viewed as loaded or demeaning.
If you must mention a newsmaker’s parental status and if it is relevant, use a neutral description such as "has no children."

06/14/2022

In general, we spell out numbers at the start of a sentence: Forty years was a long time to wait. An exception is years: 1992 was a very good year. Another exception: Numeral(s) and letter(s) combinations: 401(k) plans are offered. 3D movies are drawing more fans.

06/14/2022
Associated Press Stylebook

ICYMI, here are some of our most popular AP style tips from the last year:
http://apne.ws/h4mdN8N
No, ICYMI is not in the Stylebook as shorthand for "in case you missed it." Sometimes even the Stylebook bends the rules.

More from our disabilities guidance: Don’t limit coverage of disabled people to coverage of disabilities. People with disabilities are experts in as many fields as nondisabled people are. Include their voices and their images in your regular coverage of any topic.

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Comments

AP Stylebook recently released a Transgender Coverage Topical Guide that shows signs of media bias. https://www.allsides.com/blog/media-bias-alert-ap-omits-other-side-transgender-style-guidelines
Is early career hyphenated? IE: Early Career Luncheon or Early Career Neurosurgeon Luncheon.
Assault weapon, assault rifle ‘politicized’ terms that media have to stop using, per AP Stylebook Gun terminology change could have huge impact on journalism and public debate. Read my analysis in #EmilyPosts here:
Hi! I can't seem to find anything on writing dimensions of three or more. For example, something written like this 12" x 24" x 6", I'm inclined to correct it: 12 by 24 by 6 inches. Is that correct? Please help🙏
Should "like" and "share" be capitalized in: "Please Like and Share our page." I see it capitalized in informal writing more frequently now, but it still doesn't seem right. Does AP have a stance on this?
The AP Stylebook recently published its 56th edition. Check out our #blog for a snapshot of some of the new guidelines to this resource for writers and #PRpros: https://bit.ly/3uvY7QT
The AP Stylebook is horrifically anti-Semitic, beginning with its alteration of "antisemitic" to rob it of its meaning and value, and continuing with its forced instructions to reporters and journalists to be slanted against Israel in all they write. The Stylebook is non-essential and should not be used anywhere else. The AP has proven itself to be unethical, bigoted and unreliable.
Please help me determine which is correct: 1) "His untiring dedication to build the Dream Field BROUGHT the joy of play and baseball to those of all abilities." or 2) "His untiring dedication to build the Dream Field HAS BROUGHT the joy of play and baseball to those of all abilities."?
🗣️ RESOURCE: The Associated Press Stylebook (AP Stylebook) has been updated to reflect inclusive storytelling with updates on "covering disabilities, race, gender, s*x and s*xual orientation, and religion." Read at the link below! ⬇️
On June 1, 2022, the Associated Press published the 56th edition of their AP Stylebook, and they're now recommending using “incarceration” instead of the often inaccurately used, “internment,” to describe the unjust action that the U.S. Government inflicted upon more than 120,000 Japanese/Japanese Americans during World War II. This is a welcome change. But as Manzanar Committee Co-Chair Bruce Embrey writes, it is just a step in the right direction.
We are happy to share the news that AP Stylebook has revised its guidelines on the language of Japanese American incarceration during WWII. “Internment” applies to the detention of citizens of countries with which the US is at war, but two-thirds of the Japanese Americans incarcerated were US citizens. First-generation Japanese immigrants were not allowed to become citizens because of race-based exclusion laws, but their children born in the US were. There were actual internment camps in the US specifically for detaining foreign nationals. However, sites like Minidoka, Manzanar, and Tule Lake were different—they were incarceration camps (or concentration camps) created to hold Japanese American citizens and their families. Euphemisms created by the government to justify their actions are still being used today. “Internment” emphasizes the supposed foreignness of the Japanese Americans who were incarcerated and doesn’t accurately describe their experiences. We hope this change to the AP Stylebook, which is used by journalists to keep up to date with current acceptable practices in writing, will increase awareness of this issue and why it is important to us.
Just released: Many new and revised AP Stylebook entries contain guidance relevant to inclusive storytelling, including 35 new or revised disabilities-related entries, and expanded pronoun guidance.
AP Stylebook regularly issues revisions to stay current with the trends. Sachs Media's grammar guru Jon Peck examines how one of their recent updates provides a fascinating insight into how our culture changes over time.
Could we please put an end to headlines containing the phrase "Scientists are baffled?" It makes it appear as if the scientific community is a collective oaf that throws its hands up in defeat every time a new phenomenon occurs. I can't imagine a credible scientists telling a reporter, "Y'know, I looked at the phenomenon and I'm just baffled..." That's simply not how science works, Perhaps instead, we could say "Scientists continuing to study new phenomenon" or even "Our reporters and editors are baffled by the scientific method." That would seem more apt.
The 2022 AP Stylebook updates include guidance on inclusive storytelling that all PR and social media pros can benefit from. Here's what you need to know: https://bit.ly/APStylebook22
We applaud AP Stylebook for humanizing the way we communicate. Language matters. "Being an inclusive storyteller calls on all of us to stretch beyond our accustomed ways of thinking, our usual sources, our regular, go-to topics or angles for coverage. It challenges us to recognize and examine our unconscious biases and find ways to overcome them." 👏 #APStylebook #inclusivity #inclusivelanguage #inclusivemarketing