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Science Source Images Science Source® Images provides quality photography, illustration, video & animation specializing in healthcare, biomedical, technology, physical sciences and the natural and life sciences.

SS2755825https://www.sciencesource.com/archive/Water-bear--SEM-SS2755825.htmlWater bear (Echiniscus granulatus). Colored...
05/15/2019

SS2755825
https://www.sciencesource.com/archive/Water-bear--SEM-SS2755825.html

Water bear (Echiniscus granulatus). Colored scanning electron micrograph (SEM) showing the underside of a water bear, or tardigrade (phylum Tardigrada). Water bears are small, water-dwelling, segmented micro-animals with eight legs that live in damp habitats such as moss or lichen. They are classed as extremophiles as they can survive dry conditions by changing into a desiccated state, in which they can remain for many years. Whilst in this form (known as a tun) they can withstand the most extreme environments and can tolerate radiation levels as high as x1000 more than other animals, including humans. They have even been brought back alive after spending 10 days in the vacuum of space. Magnification: x100, when printed at 10 centimeters.
© Steve Gschmeissner/Science Source

SS21967010https://www.sciencesource.com/archive/Ebola-Virus-Particle--SEM-SS21967010.htmlScanning electron micrograph sh...
05/13/2019

SS21967010
https://www.sciencesource.com/archive/Ebola-Virus-Particle--SEM-SS21967010.html

Scanning electron micrograph showing a single filamentous Ebola virus particle. Ebola is one of the four known viruses that cause hemorrhagic fever. It is believed to be zoonotic, and native to the African continent. The Ebola pathogen is a member of the Filoviridae family of RNA viruses. It is known to be spread through close contact with an infected host. Mortality rates of an individual with hemorrhagic fever range from 50-90%.
©Science Source

SS21965603https://www.sciencesource.com/archive/Brain-Cancer-(treated)--MRI-SS21965603.htmlMRI of the brain in 52 year o...
05/08/2019

SS21965603
https://www.sciencesource.com/archive/Brain-Cancer-(treated)--MRI-SS21965603.html

MRI of the brain in 52 year old female with non small cell lung cancer carcinoma with an ALK (anaplastic lymphoma kinase) positive mutation. Baseline MRI reveals widespread metastatic disease to brain in frontal , parietal and occipital lobes. Patient had total resolution of multiple brain metastases with oral targeted agent alectinib, a drug that blocks the activity of ALK. Axial FLAIR image shows treated metastatic lesions in right occipital lobe.
©Steven Needell/Science Source

SS21935800https://www.sciencesource.com/archive/Colliding-Galaxies--NGC-6052-SS21935800.htmlLocated in the constellation...
05/03/2019

SS21935800
https://www.sciencesource.com/archive/Colliding-Galaxies--NGC-6052-SS21935800.html

Located in the constellation of Hercules, about 230 million light-years away, NGC 6052 is a pair of colliding galaxies. They were first discovered in 1784 by William Herschel and were originally classified as a single irregular galaxy because of their odd shape. However, NGC 6052 actually consists of two galaxies that are in the process of colliding. This image was taken using the Wide Field Camera 3 on the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope.
Credit: ESA/Hubble & NASA, A. Adamo et al./Science Source

SS21933143https://www.sciencesource.com/archive/Pingualuit-Crater-SS21933143.htmlThe Pingualuit Crater, formerly called ...
05/01/2019

SS21933143
https://www.sciencesource.com/archive/Pingualuit-Crater-SS21933143.html

The Pingualuit Crater, formerly called the Chubb Crater and later the New Quebec Crater, is a young impact crater, by geological standards, located on the Ungava Peninsula, in the administrative region of Nord-du-Québec, in Quebec, Canada. It is 2.14 miles in diameter, and is estimated to be 1.4 ± 0.1 million years old (Pleistocene). The crater and the surrounding area are now part of Pingualuit National Park. The only species of fish in the crater lake is the arctic char. The 876 feet deep Pingualuk Lake fills the hollow, and is one of the deepest lakes in North America. The lake also holds some of the purest fresh water in the world. Largely unknown to the outside world, the lake-filled crater had long been known to local Inuit who knew it as the Crystal Eye of Nunavik for its clear water. WWII pilots often used the almost perfectly circular landmark as a navigational tool.
Credit: NASA Earth Observatory

SS2726663https://www.sciencesource.com/archive/Flame-tests-SS2726663.htmlFlame tests. Digital composite showing flame te...
04/29/2019

SS2726663
https://www.sciencesource.com/archive/Flame-tests-SS2726663.html

Flame tests. Digital composite showing flame tests for different elements, left to right: strontium, copper, potassium, calcium. Nichrome wire loop is dipped into a solution of the respective compound (SrCl2, CuSO4, KCl, CaCl2) and brought into the flame from a propane Bunsen burner. The color of the flame is determined by the element's emission spectrum which is characteristic to that element. Therefore, flame test can be used as an analytic procedure for identifying elements.
©Turtle Rock Scientific/ Science Source

Science Source Images
04/08/2019

Science Source Images

SS21935312
https://www.sciencesource.com/archive/Candida-auris-SS21935312.html

A strain of Candida auris cultured in a petri dish. Candida auris is an emerging fungus that presents a serious global health threat. Healthcare facilities in the United States and several countries have reported that C. auris has caused severe illness in hospitalized patients. Some strains of C. auris are resistant to all three major classes of antifungal drugs. This type of multidrug resistance has not been seen before in other species of Candida. C. auris is difficult to identify with standard laboratory methods, and can be misidentified in labs without specific technology.
Credit: Shawn Lockhart/ CDC/ Science Source

SS21935312https://www.sciencesource.com/archive/Candida-auris-SS21935312.htmlA strain of Candida auris cultured in a pet...
04/08/2019

SS21935312
https://www.sciencesource.com/archive/Candida-auris-SS21935312.html

A strain of Candida auris cultured in a petri dish. Candida auris is an emerging fungus that presents a serious global health threat. Healthcare facilities in the United States and several countries have reported that C. auris has caused severe illness in hospitalized patients. Some strains of C. auris are resistant to all three major classes of antifungal drugs. This type of multidrug resistance has not been seen before in other species of Candida. C. auris is difficult to identify with standard laboratory methods, and can be misidentified in labs without specific technology.
Credit: Shawn Lockhart/ CDC/ Science Source

Science Source Images
04/05/2019

Science Source Images

SS21331414
https://www.sciencesource.com/archive/Warp-drive-experiment--illustration-SS21331414.html

Warp drive experiment. Illustration of an interferometer apparatus being used to detect the production of a warp drive field. This is a theoretical concept known as the Alcubierre metric, where a spacecraft travels faster than light by contracting the space in front of it and expanding the space behind it. Here, a laser is used with mirrors and beam splitters and reflectors to generate an interference signal at a detector (right). At upper right, a toroid capacitor ring is used to generate the warp field. If a warp field is successfully produced, this will show in the signal received at the detector. This experiment was proposed in 2006 by NASA engineer and physicist Harold G. White, and is known as the White-Juday warp-field interferometer.
©MIKKEL JUUL JENSEN/ Science Source

Science Source Images
04/05/2019

Science Source Images

SS21331414
https://www.sciencesource.com/archive/Warp-drive-experiment--illustration-SS21331414.html

Warp drive experiment. Illustration of an interferometer apparatus being used to detect the production of a warp drive field. This is a theoretical concept known as the Alcubierre metric, where a spacecraft travels faster than light by contracting the space in front of it and expanding the space behind it. Here, a laser is used with mirrors and beam splitters and reflectors to generate an interference signal at a detector (right). At upper right, a toroid capacitor ring is used to generate the warp field. If a warp field is successfully produced, this will show in the signal received at the detector. This experiment was proposed in 2006 by NASA engineer and physicist Harold G. White, and is known as the White-Juday warp-field interferometer.
©MIKKEL JUUL JENSEN/ Science Source

SS21331414https://www.sciencesource.com/archive/Warp-drive-experiment--illustration-SS21331414.htmlWarp drive experiment...
04/05/2019

SS21331414
https://www.sciencesource.com/archive/Warp-drive-experiment--illustration-SS21331414.html

Warp drive experiment. Illustration of an interferometer apparatus being used to detect the production of a warp drive field. This is a theoretical concept known as the Alcubierre metric, where a spacecraft travels faster than light by contracting the space in front of it and expanding the space behind it. Here, a laser is used with mirrors and beam splitters and reflectors to generate an interference signal at a detector (right). At upper right, a toroid capacitor ring is used to generate the warp field. If a warp field is successfully produced, this will show in the signal received at the detector. This experiment was proposed in 2006 by NASA engineer and physicist Harold G. White, and is known as the White-Juday warp-field interferometer.
©MIKKEL JUUL JENSEN/ Science Source

Science Source Images
04/03/2019

Science Source Images

SS21927647
https://www.sciencesource.com/archive/Tumor-Targeted-Magnetic-Iron-Oxide-Nanoparticles-SS21927647.html

Tumor-Targeted Magnetic Iron Oxide Nanoparticles. Investigators in the Cancer Nanotechnology Platform Partnership (CNPP) at Emory University have developed tumor-targeting magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles for image-guided pancreatic cancer therapy. The nanoparticles deliver therapeutic agents into pancreatic cancer tumors and produce signals that can be tracked by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). This microscopy image of a tumor section (obtained from a mouse tumor model) shows the blue-stained nanoparticles selectively accumulating in the peripheral tumor area and then penetrating into tumor cells.
Credit: NCI/ Science Source

Science Source Images
04/03/2019

Science Source Images

SS21927647
https://www.sciencesource.com/archive/Tumor-Targeted-Magnetic-Iron-Oxide-Nanoparticles-SS21927647.html

Tumor-Targeted Magnetic Iron Oxide Nanoparticles. Investigators in the Cancer Nanotechnology Platform Partnership (CNPP) at Emory University have developed tumor-targeting magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles for image-guided pancreatic cancer therapy. The nanoparticles deliver therapeutic agents into pancreatic cancer tumors and produce signals that can be tracked by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). This microscopy image of a tumor section (obtained from a mouse tumor model) shows the blue-stained nanoparticles selectively accumulating in the peripheral tumor area and then penetrating into tumor cells.
Credit: NCI/ Science Source

SS21927647https://www.sciencesource.com/archive/Tumor-Targeted-Magnetic-Iron-Oxide-Nanoparticles-SS21927647.htmlTumor-Ta...
04/03/2019

SS21927647
https://www.sciencesource.com/archive/Tumor-Targeted-Magnetic-Iron-Oxide-Nanoparticles-SS21927647.html

Tumor-Targeted Magnetic Iron Oxide Nanoparticles. Investigators in the Cancer Nanotechnology Platform Partnership (CNPP) at Emory University have developed tumor-targeting magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles for image-guided pancreatic cancer therapy. The nanoparticles deliver therapeutic agents into pancreatic cancer tumors and produce signals that can be tracked by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). This microscopy image of a tumor section (obtained from a mouse tumor model) shows the blue-stained nanoparticles selectively accumulating in the peripheral tumor area and then penetrating into tumor cells.
Credit: NCI/ Science Source

Science Source Images
03/29/2019

Science Source Images

SS21927858
https://www.sciencesource.com/archive/Apollo-11--Earthrise--1969-SS21927858.html

Earthrise. View of Moon limb with Earth on the horizon, Mare Smythii Region. This image was taken before separation of the LM and the Command Module during Apollo 11 Mission. Apollo 11 was the spaceflight that landed the first two people on the Moon. Commander Neil Armstrong and lunar module pilot Buzz Aldrin landed the Apollo Lunar Module Eagle on July 20, 1969. Armstrong became the first person to step onto the lunar surface six hours later on July 21; Aldrin joined him 19 minutes later. They spent about two hours together outside the spacecraft, and collected 47.5 pounds of lunar material to bring back to Earth. Command module pilot Michael Collins flew the command module Columbia alone in lunar orbit while they were on the Moon's surface. Armstrong and Aldrin spent 21.5 hours on the lunar surface before rejoining Columbia in lunar orbit.
Credit: NASA/ Science SOurce

SS21927858https://www.sciencesource.com/archive/Apollo-11--Earthrise--1969-SS21927858.htmlEarthrise. View of Moon limb w...
03/29/2019

SS21927858
https://www.sciencesource.com/archive/Apollo-11--Earthrise--1969-SS21927858.html

Earthrise. View of Moon limb with Earth on the horizon, Mare Smythii Region. This image was taken before separation of the LM and the Command Module during Apollo 11 Mission. Apollo 11 was the spaceflight that landed the first two people on the Moon. Commander Neil Armstrong and lunar module pilot Buzz Aldrin landed the Apollo Lunar Module Eagle on July 20, 1969. Armstrong became the first person to step onto the lunar surface six hours later on July 21; Aldrin joined him 19 minutes later. They spent about two hours together outside the spacecraft, and collected 47.5 pounds of lunar material to bring back to Earth. Command module pilot Michael Collins flew the command module Columbia alone in lunar orbit while they were on the Moon's surface. Armstrong and Aldrin spent 21.5 hours on the lunar surface before rejoining Columbia in lunar orbit.
Credit: NASA/ Science SOurce

SS21916221https://www.sciencesource.com/archive/Nano-vaccine-Cancer-Treatment--SEM-SS21916221.htmlColor enhanced scannin...
03/28/2019

SS21916221
https://www.sciencesource.com/archive/Nano-vaccine-Cancer-Treatment--SEM-SS21916221.html

Color enhanced scanning electron microscope image of bone marrow cells that were stimulated with cytokines (signaling molecules used extensively in intercellular communication) to favor differentiation into antigen presenting cells, known as dendritic cells. These dendritic cells are then presented with the nano-vaccines (as shown in this image), which are porous silicon particle discs loaded with immune stimulating molecules and tumor antigens. These now activated cells are then injected back into the host to stimulate an anti-tumor response. Researchers at the Texas Center for Cancer Nanomedicine (TCCN) are working on the development of these nano-vaccines for cancer therapy.
Credit: National Cancer Institute/ Science Source

SS21907473https://www.sciencesource.com/archive/Plantar-Fasciitis--Illustration-SS21907473.htmlEditorial montage illustr...
03/25/2019

SS21907473
https://www.sciencesource.com/archive/Plantar-Fasciitis--Illustration-SS21907473.html

Editorial montage illustration depicting various elements related to plantar fasciitis, shwoing a raised foot with the bony anatomy, plantar ligament and heel bone spurs. Other imagery includes trigger point injection of the heel, massage therapy using a foot roller and a physician using an ultrasound device on a foot. Anti-inflammatory drugs (ibuprofen) are also shown.
©Mark Miller/ Science Source

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