Grove Atlantic

Grove Atlantic has been publishing books at the forefront of the American literary and publishing scene for more than seventy-five years. Founded in 1917, Atlantic Monthly Press is one of two hardcover imprints of Grove Atlantic. As a book publishing imprint borne out of the venerable Atlantic Monthly magazine, AMP won numerous Pulitzer Prizes and National Book Awards and included the bestselling titles Mutiny on the Bounty; Goodbye, Mr. Chips; Ship of Fools; Fire in the Lake; The Soul of a New Machine; and Blue Highways. In 1986, the press was separated from the magazine by new owners and established as a fully independent publishing house. Under this new leadership in the late 1980s and early 1990s, the press published such authors as Raymond Carver, Ron Chernow (National Book Award 1990), J. P. Donleavy, Richard Ford, Francisco Goldman, Jay McInerney, P. J. O’Rourke, Rian Malan, Jeanette Winterson, Tobias Wolff, Sherman Alexie, Mark Bowden, and Charles Frazier. Grove Press is a hardcover and paperback imprint of Grove Atlantic. GP was founded on Grove Street in New York’s Greenwich Village in 1947, but its true beginning came in 1951 when twenty-eight-year-old Barney Rosset Jr. bought the company and turned it into one of the most influential publishers of the 1950s, 1960s, and 1970s. Publishing eight Nobel laureates, Grove Press brought to national prominence the art and artists of the counterculture and of the post-World War II disillusionment in Europe and America: the San Francisco and New York poets, the New York "action" painters, the French Surrealists, the German Expressionists, the dramatists of the Absurd. Authors include Samuel Beckett, Harold Pinter, William S. Burroughs, Jack Kerouac, Tom Stoppard, Jean Genet, Jerzy Kosinski, Richard Flanagan, Barry Hannah, Henry Miller, Kenzaburo Oe, and Man Booker prize-winners Kiran Desai and Anne Enright. Fighting many of the key censorship laws in publishing Lady Chatterley's Lover by D.H. Lawrence and Tropic of Cancer by Henry Miller, Grove’s books have broken down barriers of sexual morality and introduced American audiences to foreign writers at a pace that has yet to be matched by any other U.S. publisher. In February 1993, Grove Press and Atlantic Monthly Press merged to form Grove Atlantic, Inc.

“On July 13, 1924, the Oregonian, a Portland daily, reported that a group of five miners, prospecting on the southeast...
07/02/2019
That Was No Bear | John Zada

“On July 13, 1924, the Oregonian, a Portland daily, reported that a group of five miners, prospecting on the southeastern slopes of Mount Saint Helens in Washington State, had been attacked in their cabin by a group of ‘Mountain Devils.’ The story later came to be known as the ‘Ape Canyon incident,’ named after the gorge where the attack took place and where gorilla-like creatures had been seen for as long as anyone could remember.”

Loving this excerpt from John Zada’s IN THE VALLEYS OF THE NOBLE BEYOND: IN SEARCH OF THE SASQUATCH, up now at Lapham's Quarterly. The book is on sale today!

A short history of Bigfoot sightings and lore.

Grove Atlantic's cover photo
07/01/2019

Grove Atlantic's cover photo

Happy Pride! This weekend marks the 50th anniversary of Stonewall, and we’re celebrating—how else?—by reading LGBT...
06/28/2019
Stonewall at 50: Suggested readings for Pride! | Grove Atlantic

Happy Pride! This weekend marks the 50th anniversary of Stonewall, and we’re celebrating—how else?—by reading LGBTQ+ authors. Join us!

Pride Month is an important global event every year, but this year is special: June 28th, 2019 is the fiftieth anniversary of the start of the Stonewall riots, the event that each year's Pride Month commemorates. It's also a special year because, in honor of a half-century of gay rights, gay pride,....

Tremendously pleased to have published three of The New York Times Books’ 50 Best Memoirs of the Past 50 years: Helen ...
06/26/2019
The 50 Best Memoirs of the Past 50 Years

Tremendously pleased to have published three of The New York Times Books’ 50 Best Memoirs of the Past 50 years: Helen Macdonald’s H IS FOR HAWK (“Nearly every paragraph she writes… is strange in the best way, and injected with unexpected meaning”), Jeanette Winterson’s WHY BE HAPPY WHEN YOU COULD BE NORMAL? (“The device of the trapped young person saved by books is a hoary one, but Winterson makes it seem new, and sulfurous”), and Tobias Wolff’s THIS BOY’S LIFE (“His prose lights up the experience of growing up in America during [the 1950s].”).

The New York Times’s book critics select the most outstanding memoirs published since 1969.

In a remarkable piece of writing at Ploughshares, Zeena Yasmine Fuleihan writes on representation in fiction, and of fin...
06/25/2019
Language of the Diaspora

In a remarkable piece of writing at Ploughshares, Zeena Yasmine Fuleihan writes on representation in fiction, and of finding powerful resonances with her own diasporic family history in Isabella Hammad’s acclaimed debut novel THE PARISIAN:

“Hammad’s dialogue put my own family’s language on the written page before me in a way I had never seen… [It] brings the pitch of voice, the exact words that one would always choose to say in Arabic, the French that family members can’t seem to help but employ in certain situations, the exact sounds of language I grew up hearing in my diasporic home to the written page of a book that is really not concerned with diaspora. Perhaps this irony is what made the experience so unique to me: I have never seen such an intimate facet of my experience represented in literature when a main concern at hand is not to represent someone like me.…

“While readers of THE PARISIAN who have no knowledge of Arabic will find the book no less of an incredibly crafted tale than readers with an understanding of the language, I know the connotations and untranslatable meaning I glean from Hammad’s dialogue enrichens the scenes and characters. A bond forms between my experience and this book, the first I’ve read that shows it values my knowledge of Arabic, hazy and rather formless as it is—the collage of tongues that I for so long only experienced inside the walls of my family’s home suddenly appears in a new, public scene. Hammad writes in the sounds of my childhood, the language of my diaspora.”

Home  »  Personal Essays   »   Language of the Diaspora Language of the Diaspora Author: Zeena Yasmine Fuleihan | Jun232019 Posted in Personal Essays No comments Translation, representation, cultural awareness, empathy, the immigrant experience—these topics float at the forefront of much...

In pages no less august than those of TIME Magazine, Stephanie Zacharek looks at three recent novels that consider femal...
06/21/2019
Female Friendships Are the Best, Until They Aren't

In pages no less august than those of TIME Magazine, Stephanie Zacharek looks at three recent novels that consider female friendship, including Lauren Acampora’s THE PAPER WASP:

“THE PAPER WASP is more hypnotic and sensual than either of the other books in this recent crop, which also makes it more potent. Acampora’s prose has a seductive, pearlescent allure, even when she’s addressing doomed friendships, friends who can never live up to our expectations, friends who betray.”

Summer novels explore the raw realities of female friendships

Over at CNN, an excellent piece by nurse, author, and activist Theresa Brown looks at the tremendous disparity in resour...
06/20/2019
Do more with less? Nurse says that's nonsense

Over at CNN, an excellent piece by nurse, author, and activist Theresa Brown looks at the tremendous disparity in resources between pharmaceutical companies and medical practices.

There’s also an assist from one of the unforgettable stories told in CODE BLUE, Mike Magee’s stunning new exposé of the Medical Industrial Complex in America, how it was formed, and how we can reform it so that it works for everyone.

Nurse Theresa Brown says she's tired of hearing that caregivers are being told to "do more with less." That isn't the way to fix America's broken system of health care, she argues.

“In an alternate version of New York City—where a female Green Party candidate won the White House—Ben falls in lo...
06/18/2019
Under the radar, underrated, or simply missed: 7 books from 2019’s first half that deserve more attention

“In an alternate version of New York City—where a female Green Party candidate won the White House—Ben falls in love with a ‘Hungarian-Turkish-Persian’ artist named Kate at a party. The thing about Kate is, every night she dreams about living in 16th-century England as a woman named Emilia, and having an affair with William Shakespeare. In fact, it’s more than a recurring dream to Kate—it’s a second life. Newman is one of the smartest and funniest writers on Twitter, and this weird, addicting, masterful novel should catapult her to further acclaim.”

Awfully glad to see Sandra Newman’s THE HEAVENS included in this list of seven recent books that deserve your attention, up at The A.V. Club.

A pair of surrealist story collections in translation, the latest entry in “Anthropocene feminist fiction,” and more.

Over at Electric Literature, an amazing list of books that take you inside a truly messed-up mind, from Lauren Acampora,...
06/11/2019
7 Novels That Take You Inside Truly Messed-Up Minds - Electric Literature

Over at Electric Literature, an amazing list of books that take you inside a truly messed-up mind, from Lauren Acampora, author of THE PAPER WASP — which is on sale now! Join “the whole gamut of desperate loners, eccentrics, misanthropes, and sociopaths” with these 7 titles, and grab THE PAPER WASP wherever excellent debut novels that paint “in full color [their protagonist’s] own jagged emotional landscape, the fierce drive of her artistic ambition and its dizzying alternation with self-doubt,” are sold.

Lauren Acampora, author of "The Paper Wasp," recommends darkly captivating narrators in fiction

06/06/2019
What was it like?

On the 75th anniversary of the invasion of Normandy, we’re reading this absolutely phenomenal review of James Holland’s NORMANDY ’44 at the Times Literary Supplement:

“Any brief analysis of an undertaking of this size cannot do justice to Holland’s impressive organization of facts, figures and details. His narrative style is fluent and pleasingly colloquial… At the same time every detail is scrupulously referenced – Holland’s select bibliography is nearly thirty pages long. As an account of this mighty and vitally significant clash of armies on many battlefields Normandy ’44 stands as richly impressive, hard to surpass…

“Holland does not neglect the loftier, panoramic view, however. In fact, the astonishing success of the invasion and the Normandy campaign has rather coloured the reality… ‘Normandy’, James Holland reminds us, ‘was absolutely brutal.’”

My late uncle Ronald Boyd (1926–77) was present at D-Day, June 6, 1944. He was an eighteen-year-old able seaman on HMS Ajax, a light cruiser of the Leander class, part of the vast armada that assembled to assault the Normandy coastline in the biggest seaborne invasion the world had ever witnessed....

“One of [Mike Magee’s] key insights is that it is not a lack of checks and balances that causes the health care syst...
06/04/2019
Review: 'Code Blue,' by Mike Magee

“One of [Mike Magee’s] key insights is that it is not a lack of checks and balances that causes the health care system to not work in patients’ best interests. The problem is that the controls are compromised at each step in the system by executives who find rising paychecks as they hop from industry to industry, ‘always aware that their willingness to go along to get along in one arena can improve the quality of the placement in the next.’”

The Star Tribune reviews Mike Magee’s CODE BLUE — on sale today!

NONFICTION: "Code Blue" reveals long-standing, intractable problems.

“RED BIRDS is a piercingly laugh-out-loud novel in a genre that doesn’t often abide comedy. But Hanif pushes his nar...
06/03/2019
Review | ‘Red Birds’ is a blistering — and funny — critique of America’s military meddling

“RED BIRDS is a piercingly laugh-out-loud novel in a genre that doesn’t often abide comedy. But Hanif pushes his narrative beyond mere irony, expanding his critique of America’s military interventions to include satire, ghost stories and absurdist touches — up to and including a canine narrator that’s usually smarter than any human in the room…Because the location of RED BIRDS is unnamed, his satire is more powerfully universal, pulling in a whole complex of refugees, aid workers and more who’ve been forced to live with the absurd consequences of war culture.”

The Washington Post raves about Mohammed Hanif’s brand-new novel, RED BIRDS!

Mohammed Hanif takes aim at the war machine, with his pen.

Grove Atlantic's cover photo
05/31/2019

Grove Atlantic's cover photo

“Take ‘The Talented Mr. Ripley,’ cross it with ‘Suspiria,’ add a dash of ‘La La Land’ & mix it all at midn...
05/28/2019
Summer Reading

“Take ‘The Talented Mr. Ripley,’ cross it with ‘Suspiria,’ add a dash of ‘La La Land’ & mix it all at midnight & this arty psychological stalker novel is what might result.”

In which the New York Times tells you to read Lauren Acampora’s THE PAPER WASP, is correct.

Dive in! Here are 75 of the latest and greatest books to keep you company as temperatures climb and days grow long.

From Publishers Weekly, the story of Karl Marlantes’s latest, DEEP RIVER, forthcoming this summer.“Set in the early ...
05/20/2019
The Mystical Undercurrents of Karl Marlantes

From Publishers Weekly, the story of Karl Marlantes’s latest, DEEP RIVER, forthcoming this summer.

“Set in the early decades of the 20th century among Finnish immigrants in Washington State, Karl Marlantes’s second novel seems a drastic shift from MATTERHORN, his acclaimed 2010 debut based on his experiences as a Marine in Vietnam. Yet DEEP RIVER, which Atlantic Monthly Press will publish in July, was also sparked by a personal link: ‘I grew up in a little town on the Oregon coast where everybody was connected to the logging industry,’ the writer says. ‘That’s in my background, and I always wanted to write about it.’”

Marlantes’s second novel, 'Deep River,' is a sprawling, painstakingly realistic novel about Finnish immigrants in the Pacific Northwest during the first half of the 20th century.

“I hope this novel may function as an allegory for humanity itself.“With respect to the question of chicken and the ...
05/17/2019
In "The Day the Sun Died," Violent Sleepwalkers Terrorize a Town - Electric Literature

“I hope this novel may function as an allegory for humanity itself.

“With respect to the question of chicken and the egg, this is a paradox that describes the way that contemporary science and civilization are bringing humanity to the end of days. The inexorable development of robots and of the omnipotent internet, together with the tantalizing quest for immortality, which at times seems to be just around the corner—although these might appear to constitute the endpoint of humanity’s development, aren’t they also a force dragging humanity into a new abyss? Aren’t these developments simply a way of using human desires to control us, in the name of science and civilization? If you think carefully, just as China is unable to rouse itself from its current daydream, isn’t humanity similarly unable to rouse itself from its collective daydream?”

Yan Lianke, arguably China’s most prominent and respected novelist, talks with Electric Literature on subjects that include China and the world, sleepwalking and mindlessness, cannibalism (um, yeah), and, of course, his most recent novel, the mind-blowing THE DAY THE SUN DIED.

Read this!

Yan Lianke discusses his newly-translated novel and the dark side of dreams

Huge news! CONVENIENCE STORE WOMAN, by Sayaka Murata and translated by Ginny Tapley Takemori, is a finalist for this yea...
05/16/2019
Best Translated Book Awards Names 2019 Finalists - The Millions

Huge news! CONVENIENCE STORE WOMAN, by Sayaka Murata and translated by Ginny Tapley Takemori, is a finalist for this year’s Best Translated Book Award!

Huge thanks to the judges who put it on that list, and to the big community of booksellers, librarians, and readers who’ve made it a sensation!

Fingers crossed for May 29th, when final #BTBA winners will be announced!

Angelinos! On June 6th, Kathleen Hale, author of the outlandish, candid, and sometimes unsettling essay collection KATHL...
05/14/2019
Kathleen Hale Is a Crazy Stalker -- Kathleen Hale with Heather Anne Campbell

Angelinos! On June 6th, Kathleen Hale, author of the outlandish, candid, and sometimes unsettling essay collection KATHLEEN HALE IS A CRAZY STALKER, will appear in conversation with comedian Heather Anne Campbell at The Last Bookstore. Tickets are available now, cost the same as a copy of the book, and come with… a copy of the book. See you there!

Note: Your ticket includes - and is the same price as - the book. The Last Bookstore is pleased to present Kathleen Hale launching her new essay collection Kathleen Hale Is A Crazy Stalker in conversation with writer and comedian Heather Anne Campbell. Kathleen Hale Is A Crazy Stalker is a captivati...

“I grew up around a lot of stories. Everyone in my family is an amazing storyteller. My grandmother can tell stories f...
05/07/2019
"The Parisian" Weaves Family Stories and Palestinian History Into a Debut Novel - Electric Literature

“I grew up around a lot of stories. Everyone in my family is an amazing storyteller. My grandmother can tell stories for days. Her stories are weapons. The other element is language, and expression, self-expression. There is a particular pleasure from language that I do not get from anything else.”

The amazing Isabella Hammad, author of THE PARISIAN, at Electric Literature.

Isabella Hammad on finding fiction inspiration in her great-grandfather's life and homeland

Ah, excellent — at POPSUGAR, Brenda Janowitz lists the books that are absolute MUSTs for your beach bag this summer, i...
05/06/2019
Is There Still Sex in the City? by Candace Bushnell

Ah, excellent — at POPSUGAR, Brenda Janowitz lists the books that are absolute MUSTs for your beach bag this summer, including IS THERE STILL SEX IN THE CITY?, by the one and only Candace Bushnell!

“You know the title. You watched the show. Maybe you even saw the movies. Candace Bushnell is back doing what she knows best: chronicling the lives of women and how they find love. This time, she turns her lens on middle-aged men and women, and the result is pure magic. At turns wistful and sad, thoughtful and funny, IS THERE STILL SEX IN THE CITY? is even better than the original.”

#istherestillsex #satc #candacebushnell #sexandthecity

You know the title. You watched the show. Maybe you even saw the movies. Candace Bushnell is back doing what she knows best: chronicling the lives of women and

“Würger’s debut was a bestseller in his native Germany. Its universal themes, brilliantly depicted world and taut s...
05/03/2019
Review: 'The Club,' by Takis Wurger, translated from the German by Charlotte Collins

“Würger’s debut was a bestseller in his native Germany. Its universal themes, brilliantly depicted world and taut storytelling constitute a recipe for further success.… Starts out as a poignant coming-of-age tale and then morphs into an intelligent, fast-paced thriller that scrutinizes class divides and gender imbalance.”

Takis Würger’s THE CLUB, translated from the German by Charlotte Collins, gets a stunner of a review from the Star Tribune!

FICTION: A young boxer confronts privilege and seeks revenge in this gripping, globally acclaimed debut.

Grove Atlantic's cover photo
04/30/2019

Grove Atlantic's cover photo

“The very elements that draw certain readers to the boarding school novel—the messy friendships, the class rivalries...
04/30/2019
On the Literary Pitfalls of Writing About the Young and Rich

“The very elements that draw certain readers to the boarding school novel—the messy friendships, the class rivalries, the bungling faculty, the youthful rebellions, the coming-of-age and self-discovery narratives, even the timeworn appeal of boarding schools themselves, their rituals and customs, their mossy bricks and shady trees—elements that enrich the tradition in so many ways, are so familiar that they can feel cozy and no writer that I know wants to write a cozy novel. The question becomes how to tell a story that is aware of tradition without wallowing in it and ultimately bogging down in clichés, how render that old story and its telling new.”

Michael Knight, author of AT BRIARWOOD SCHOOL FOR GIRLS, on realizing he was writing a prep school novel. Thanks, Literary Hub!

A confession: I did not go to boarding school. I have, however, long been intrigued by the boarding school novel as a kind of subgenre, the way the best of them intensify traditional coming-of-age …

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