Caribbean New Yorker

MISSION STATEMENT | WHO WE ARE The Caribbean New Yorker captures the success story; the indomitable spirit and the coming of age of the third generation Indo-Caribbean in New York, whose ancestors left the shores of India 173 years ago, to Guyana in South America and Trinidad in the West Indies. Political instability in Guyana in the 60's, 70's and 80's fueled the rampant migration of almost half of the population to North America. The Richmond Hill area in Queens, a borough of New York City has turned itself into "Little Guyana." The New York Times in one of its recent article had depicted them as "Indians Twice Removed." The New York Post in it's " 50 things to see and do in New York City" had referred to Richmond Hill as "Hardworking Guyanese entrepreneurs with American work ethics and fresh fish from Guyana." Undoubtedly, they have been responsible for the revitalization of many formerly run-down neighborhoods in the borough of Queens, Brooklyn and the Bronx of New York City. The restoration of democracy in Guyana in 1992 brought about changes in socio-cultural dynamics, and the Caribbean New Yorker proudly documents this growth and emergence of Indian consciousness, the vitality of its expression, the cultural recognition and the acknowledgement that they exist as a viable people, without the burden of the socialist political rhetoric which they have been subjected to in the past. Incidently “Little Guyana” Richmond Hill, Queens, has also seen during the recent years, a heavy influx of immigrants from India, especially Sikhs/Punjabis from the state of Punjab in India. Currently they have two huge Sikh Temples and an additional two more are being built in the neighborhood. “Little Guyana” is now evolving itself into a “Mini India”. Caribbean New Yorker has devoted a special page to news from the state of Punjab. The paper is also immensely popular with the Tamils immigrants in New York from Tamil Nadu, India and we have added a special page on news from Tamil Nadu. The Caribbean New Yorker has found itself to be the most popular and the first to be picked up at the Ganesh Temple, Flushing, where South India’s immigrants in the New York Region congregate on Saturdays and Sundays. Founded in 1998, Caribbean New Yorker, a 80 page weekly, with a circulation of 20,000 is a fully professional operation, which is reflected in its contents, layout, format and orientation. Caribbean New Yorker provides almost 80% of space to matters close to the heart of the community, including highlighting institutions, individuals and events; promoting causes and campaigns; providing vital information, indulging in investigative journalism and linking with various entities and has indeed become the bridge between India, the Caribbean and the 25 million worldwide Indian Diaspora. (The publisher and editor of this newspaper himself is a third generation descendant of Indian/Tamils who left British India in the late 1800’s for Malaysia.) Now in its 13th year, our growth has been phenomenal, we started out as an Indo-Caribbean newspaper and now we have become the top community weekly newspaper that covers both the Caribbean and the Indian community in the East Coast. Our readership profile includes doctors, attorneys, real estate magnets, IT professionals and businessmen in the six eastern states of the country with an average age group of 35. We have correspondents in most Caribbean nations and in Indian cities besides stringers in US cities as well including the United Nations. We never miss any community event organized by both in Caribbean and Indian gatherings and have thus earned a special place in their hearts. We are the only news weekly that reaches out to two major communities unlike other publications that cater to only one segments of the population. Our corporate advertisers are Air India, Tourism India, Tourism Malaysia , Guyana Govt's Go- Invest, Direct TV, Dish Network, Hospitals Corporation of New York (HHC), Toyota and Nemet. It is widely distributed in Queens, Brooklyn and the Bronx. It has become the talk of the Indo-Caribbean and Indian community, and based on its feedback, it is also read by many non-community people especially Hispanics. The feedback has been positive – readers find the paper stimulating, entertaining and a chockfull of information.

Mission: MISSION STATEMENT | WHO WE ARE The Caribbean New Yorker captures the success story; the indomitable spirit and the coming of age of the third generation Indo-Caribbean in New York, whose ancestors left the shores of India 173 years ago, to Guyana in South America and Trinidad in the West Indies. Political instability in Guyana in the 60's, 70's and 80's fueled the rampant migration of almost half of the population to North America. The Richmond Hill area in Queens, a borough of New York City has turned itself into "Little Guyana." The New York Times in one of its recent article had depicted them as "Indians Twice Removed." The New York Post in it's " 50 things to see and do in New York City" had referred to Richmond Hill as "Hardworking Guyanese entrepreneurs with American work ethics and fresh fish from Guyana." Undoubtedly, they have been responsible for the revitalization of many formerly run-down neighborhoods in the borough of Queens, Brooklyn and the Bronx of New York City. The restoration of democracy in Guyana in 1992 brought about changes in socio-cultural dynamics, and the Caribbean New Yorker proudly documents this growth and emergence of Indian consciousness, the vitality of its expression, the cultural recognition and the acknowledgement that they exist as a viable people, without the burden of the socialist political rhetoric which they have been subjected to in the past. Incidently “Little Guyana” Richmond Hill, Queens, has also seen during the recent years, a heavy influx of immigrants from India, especially Sikhs/Punjabis from the state of Punjab in India. Currently they have two huge Sikh Temples and an additional two more are being built in the neighborhood. “Little Guyana” is now evolving itself into a “Mini India”. Caribbean New Yorker has devoted a special page to news from the state of Punjab. The paper is also immensely popular with the Tamils immigrants in New York from Tamil Nadu, India and we have added a special page on news from Tamil Nadu. The Caribbean New Yorker has found itself to be the most popular and the first to be picked up at the Ganesh Temple, Flushing, where South India’s immigrants in the New York Region congregate on Saturdays and Sundays. Founded in 1998, Caribbean New Yorker, a 80 page weekly, with a circulation of 20,000 is a fully professional operation, which is reflected in its contents, layout, format and orientation. Caribbean New Yorker provides almost 80% of space to matters close to the heart of the community, including highlighting institutions, individuals and events; promoting causes and campaigns; providing vital information, indulging in investigative journalism and linking with various entities and has indeed become the bridge between India, the Caribbean and the 25 million worldwide Indian Diaspora. (The publisher and editor of this newspaper himself is a third generation descendant of Indian/Tamils who left British India in the late 1800’s for Malaysia.) Now in its 13th year, our growth has been phenomenal, we started out as an Indo-Caribbean newspaper and now we have become the top community weekly newspaper that covers both the Caribbean and the Indian community in the East Coast. Our readership profile includes doctors, attorneys, real estate magnets, IT professionals and businessmen in the six eastern states of the country with an average age group of 35. We have correspondents in most Caribbean nations and in Indian cities besides stringers in US cities as well including the United Nations. We never miss any community event organized by both in Caribbean and Indian gatherings and have thus earned a special place in their hearts. We are the only news weekly that reaches out to two major communities unlike other publications that cater to only one segments of the population. Our corporate advertisers are Air India, Tourism India, Tourism Malaysia , Guyana Govt's Go- Invest, Direct TV, Dish Network, Hospitals Corporation of New York (HHC), Toyota and Nemet. It is widely distributed in Queens, Brooklyn and the Bronx. It has become the talk of the Indo-Caribbean and Indian community, and based on its feedback, it is also read by many non-community people especially Hispanics. The feedback has been positive – readers find the paper stimulating, entertaining and a chockfull of information.

08/29/2011
Local News | Cnyusa.com

Home Affairs Minister meets with West Berbice minibus, taxi drivers

http://www.cnyusa.com/news/local-news/345&Home-Affairs-Minister-meets-with-West-Berbice-minibus,-taxi-drivers.html

-road safety association to be establishedIN a relentless bid to create safer roadways in light of the recent spate of road accidents, Minister of Home Affairs, Clement Rohee, and members of the Guyana Police Force (GPF), and the National Road Safety Council (NRSC), engaged minibus and taxi drivers ...

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