America Magazine - The Jesuit Review

America Magazine - The Jesuit Review The Jesuit Review of Faith and Culture
America magazine was founded by the Society of Jesus in 1909 as a Catholic weekly review of faith and culture. The first editor in chief was John J. Wynne, S.J. (1859-1948), who also conceived the idea of the Catholic Encyclopedia, the first volume of which appeared in 1907 under his direction. From 1892 Wynne edited a devotional Catholic monthly, The Messenger of the Sacred Heart. Determined to publish materials less devotional and more wide-ranging, so that readers might ”find God in all things,” he had by 1902 divided that earlier journal in two: The Messenger of the Sacred Heart, which remained the organ of the Apostleship of Prayer, and The Messenger, a Catholic magazine of more general interest. He wanted The Messenger to be yet ”more solid and serious,” and in 1909 the improved version appeared as America. This title was meant to demonstrate the new magazine's scope, and the subtitle “Catholic Review of the Week” specified its point of view. The Jesuits at America From the beginning the magazine has been the work of Jesuits and lay colleagues from across the United States and this breadth of origin was reflected in the first editorial board, composed of Jesuits from all the U.S. provinces of the Society of Jesus then existing. Wynne himself, a peremptory if industrious character, lasted only a few months as editor of America, but the editorial formula he devised lasts to this day—editorial comment, articles and reviews of arts and letters. Since 1909 over 200 U.S. and Canadian Jesuits have been associated with America. Prominent Jesuits associated with our history include the social critic and civil rights activist John LaFarge, the theologian John Courtney Murray and Congressman Robert F. Drinan. America’s tenth editor in chief, Joseph A. O’Hare, S.J. later served as president of Fordham University. Leo J. O’Donovan, S.J., president emeritus of Georgetown University, has been a regular contributor to America since 1969. Raymond A. Schroth, S.J., America’s current Books Editor first wrote for the magazine in 1957. Editorial Directions America aggressively promoted racial and social justice from the 1930s through the 1960s, with the contributions of longtime editors like John LaFarge, S.J., and Benjamin Masse, S.J. During the Spanish Civil War (1936-38), the magazine was sympathetic to Spanish Catholics and therefore tended to support the Catholic aspects of Franco’s cause, and on this issue the magazine parted company with liberal U.S. journals with which it is sometimes compared. On the other hand, in the early 1950s, under the editorship of Robert Hartnett, S.J., America criticized Senator Joseph McCarthy, who was often championed by Catholics of that day for his supposed anti-communism, and the magazine and its editor suffered for that principled stand. In the 1960s the magazine enthusiastically reported and supported Vatican Council II, and America Press Inc. published the first available English edition of the counciliar documents. Between 1960 and 1970, C. J. McNaspy, S.J., one of the associate editors, enlivened the magazine’s appreciation of liturgy, music and the fine arts. Throughout its history, America has sought balance in its coverage, always preferring analysis to ideology. A historical example is the editorial of Aug. 17, 1968, carefully dissenting from that part of Pope Paul VI’s encyclical “Humanae Vitae” which prohibited all forms of artificial birth control. During the post-Vatican II period, the editors consistently promoted conciliar reform, but they struck a balance between the extremes of opinion in the reforming church, acting as a bridge for church dialogue. New York City The headquarters of America has been located at various addresses in Manhattan since its founding. America began life at 32 Washington Square West. In 1911, the editors moved to 59 East 83rd Street. In 1918, the editorial residence was a town house at 39 West 86th Street. Then, in 1926, another move was made, this time to a double house at 329 West 108th Street, where the editors remained for 39 years. In 1962, a generous gift from Cardinal Richard Cushing of Boston made it possible to purchase a building at 106 West 56th Street, which had been the New York headquarters of a national fraternity, Phi Gamma Delta. The nine-story facility contained living quarters, library, editorial and business offices, meeting halls and a chapel designed by Thomas Slon, S.J. In 2016, America announced the sale of its headquarters building and re-location to modern facilities elsewhere in Manhattan. America Today In 2015, Matt Malone, S.J., 14th editor in chief, announced that America Press, the publisher of America magazine, would be relaunched as America Media and would produce content across multiple media platforms in addition to print. In 2017, the number of annual print issues was reduced from 39 to 26, reflecting the fact that the majority of America’s content was now produced daily online and through social media. The print edition and website were also re-designed and relaunched in January, 2017 as America: The Jesuit Review of Faith & Culture.

Sean Dempsey, SJ, reviews a book on Los Angeles in the 1960s—written by Jon Wiener and a name familiar to all interested...
04/27/2020
Review: Exploring the radical politics of Los Angeles in the 1960's

Sean Dempsey, SJ, reviews a book on Los Angeles in the 1960s—written by Jon Wiener and a name familiar to all interested in Los Angeles history, Mike Davis:

The new book by the historians Mike Davis and Jon Wiener takes readers on a picaresque voyage around Los Angeles during the “long sixties” (1960-1973).

The Road to Emmaus is an Easter story. Like those two disciples, our hearts burn fiercely when they are united to the ri...
04/26/2020
Our love is fierce but not always faithful. That’s why we need Christ.

The Road to Emmaus is an Easter story. Like those two disciples, our hearts burn fiercely when they are united to the risen Christ. But how do we keep them fervent?

Love is a resolve we must renew each day. We ought to remember this when we promise we will live differently, more deeply, once life returns to normal.

The loss of the United Kingdom to Brexit almost suggests that the E.U. is a contemporary version of the Holy Roman Empir...
04/26/2020
The surprisingly Catholic roots of the European Union

The loss of the United Kingdom to Brexit almost suggests that the E.U. is a contemporary version of the Holy Roman Empire that unites Catholic cultures across Europe.

The far right denounces the European Union as anti-Christian totalitarianism, but Michael Daniel Driessen writes that the E.U. has its roots in Catholic universalism and a suspicion of the…

The mass protests that had roiled Hong Kong since June 2019, now largely subsided because of the Covid-19 pandemic, are ...
04/26/2020
With world attention on Covid-19, China clamps down on Hong Kong

The mass protests that had roiled Hong Kong since June 2019, now largely subsided because of the Covid-19 pandemic, are likely to return, they warn, because of recent gestures by Beijing to tighten control over the former British colony.

The mass protests that had roiled Hong Kong since June 2019, now largely subsided because of the Covid-19 pandemic, are likely to return, many warn, because of recent gestures by Beijing to tighten…

The coronavirus has exposed a truth that many scholars, health care professionals and activists of color have forcefully...
04/25/2020
What a forgotten black nun can teach us about racism and Covid-19

The coronavirus has exposed a truth that many scholars, health care professionals and activists of color have forcefully professed for decades: Racism literally kills people.

Since the outbreak of Covid-19, I have thought often about Sister Mary Anthony Duchemin and the extraordinary sacrifice that she made to the church and community at large in 1832.

It is without a trace of nostalgia that I say this series is utterly captivating simply because it tells Michael Jordan’...
04/25/2020
‘The Last Dance’ asks: What is the price of greatness?

It is without a trace of nostalgia that I say this series is utterly captivating simply because it tells Michael Jordan’s story. It is a story of greatness.

The first thing I noticed when tuning into “The Last Dance” were Michael Jordan’s eyes. The second was his glass of tequila.

This week on Jesuitical, we talk with Jennifer Overton, the regional director for West Africa for Catholic Relief Servic...
04/25/2020
Podcast: What can we learn from West Africa’s Ebola response as we fight Covid-19?

This week on Jesuitical, we talk with Jennifer Overton, the regional director for West Africa for Catholic Relief Services, which has decades of experience providing emergency health services in the region. We ask Jennifer what the United States can learn from the West African response, how the experience of Ebola changed the people of the most affected nations and what the role of the church is during the current pandemic.

A conversation with Jennifer Overton, the regional director for West Africa for Catholic Relief Services

Public Masses have been suspended for weeks. But at least two dioceses have begun gradual reopenings and others are in t...
04/24/2020
Catholic parish life (as we knew it) is not coming back anytime soon.

Public Masses have been suspended for weeks. But at least two dioceses have begun gradual reopenings and others are in the planning phases. They are figuring out how to protect worshippers while offering Catholics access to the sacraments and a return to the parish community.

There are still many unanswered questions, but interviews with physicians, public health experts, priests and diocesan leaders all elicited at least one common refrain: Even when public Masses resume, parish life will not feel normal for a while.

Interviews with physicians, public health experts, priests and diocesan leaders all elicited at least one common refrain: Even when public Masses resume, parish life will not feel normal for a while.

Today the tools of science—medicine and surgery and, yes, ventilators—have changed the scene but not its anguished human...
04/24/2020
A prayer for first responders amid the coronavirus pandemic

Today the tools of science—medicine and surgery and, yes, ventilators—have changed the scene but not its anguished human face.

Loving God, in the midst of our world’s—your world’s—coronavirus crisis, we beg to bring before you the brave women and men who are closest to the sick and suffering.

Call it tele-caring: loving our neighbors in as practical a way as we can, not simply by intention or words but by deeds...
04/24/2020
Spring reveals the beauty of nature. The coronavirus shows its destructive power.

Call it tele-caring: loving our neighbors in as practical a way as we can, not simply by intention or words but by deeds and action, even if done at a distance.

For now, the overall picture is dark, writes Leo O‘Donovan, S.J., of Jesuit Refugee Service USA, but we must still work for our brothers and sisters so that hope can endure and even blossom.

Recovery culture can provide is an ideal of work that focuses on care rather than solely on creativity.
04/24/2020
What 12-step programs can teach us about the true meaning of work

Recovery culture can provide is an ideal of work that focuses on care rather than solely on creativity.

The value of work is that it gives structure to life’s chaos; it is simple, intelligible even when your own heart is baffling; it lets you be of service to others, making every job well done a kind…

The practice of perpetual adoration has been for us as subtle as breathing, always in the background while we serve the ...
04/24/2020
When perpetual adoration takes on a new meaning

The practice of perpetual adoration has been for us as subtle as breathing, always in the background while we serve the people of God.

I visualized the monstrance standing still and silent within the closed tabernacle.

Covid-19 cannot but remind us of our mortality and fragility, and so it can help us to rethink our priorities. “All life...
04/24/2020
We’re all monks now

Covid-19 cannot but remind us of our mortality and fragility, and so it can help us to rethink our priorities. “All life is lived in the shadow of death,” said Brother Quenon, “and we forget that.”

Advice for living under quarantine from Trappist monks

After significantly walking back what had been a shocking late-night Twitter announcement of a complete ban on immigrati...
04/24/2020
Catholic leaders to Trump: Coronavirus pandemic not an excuse to crack down on immigration

After significantly walking back what had been a shocking late-night Twitter announcement of a complete ban on immigration, President Trump signed a proclamation on April 22 that calls for a 60-day freeze on the issuance of green cards for certain immigrant classes. The U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops criticized even this markedly diminished move the next day, noting that it would prevent “immigrant family members from reuniting with their loved ones living in the United States” and would bar religious workers seeking to come to the United States as lawful permanent residents “from supporting the work of our church, as well as many other religions, at this time.”

“We cannot let this moment of pandemic, which calls us all to unity as God’s children, become the occasion for further prejudice, exclusion and injustice.”

“We cannot let this moment of pandemic, which calls us all to unity as God’s children, become the occasion for further p...
04/24/2020
Catholic leaders to Trump: Coronavirus pandemic not an excuse to crack down on immigration

“We cannot let this moment of pandemic, which calls us all to unity as God’s children, become the occasion for further prejudice, exclusion and injustice,” said San Diego Bishop Robert McElroy in response to President Trump’s call for a temporary freeze on immigration.

“We cannot let this moment of pandemic, which calls us all to unity as God’s children, become the occasion for further prejudice, exclusion and injustice.”

04/23/2020

Join Matt Malone, S.J., for a weekly review of prominent events in the church and the world.

Have questions for Father Malone? Leave them in the comments!

Happy Birthday Shakespeare! We all want to know: Was Shakespeare Catholic, Protestant or an atheist?🧐🤔
04/23/2020
Was Shakespeare Catholic, Protestant or an atheist?

Happy Birthday Shakespeare! We all want to know: Was Shakespeare Catholic, Protestant or an atheist?
🧐🤔

From 2009: On William Shakespeare's 450th birthday, Kathleen Doherty Fenty asks: Does it matter what his faith was?

The enforced togetherness mandated by our collective Covid-19 pandemic precautions has tested the stitches of the vows t...
04/23/2020
Keeping your marriage vows under coronavirus quarantine

The enforced togetherness mandated by our collective Covid-19 pandemic precautions has tested the stitches of the vows that sew our marriages together.

On the other side of the pandemic, we may see “corona babies” and “corona divorces.” May we also see the best in each other as we live our vows in the time of quarantine.

While emergency departments and intensive care units in hospitals located in places hit hard by Covid-19 are working at ...
04/22/2020
Overwhelmed by coronavirus, Catholic hospitals ask for more government assistance

While emergency departments and intensive care units in hospitals located in places hit hard by Covid-19 are working at capacity or beyond, in other parts of the country medical centers have largely cleared out, with elective surgeries postponed, clinical appointments canceled and emergency departments experiencing reduced patient volume as people follow stay-at-home orders. That means hospitals are seeing dramatic drops in revenue, and so far, at least 150 hospitals have reduced staffing levels, according to Becker’s Healthcare.

“Some of our individual hospitals are experiencing losses upwards of $1 million to $2 million [per] day, while some of our health systems are reporting revenue losses in the range of $200-$600…

Pope Francis has focused his messages to the world this week on the importance of international cooperation and the shar...
04/22/2020
Podcast: Pope Francis assembled a coronavirus taskforce. What’s next?

Pope Francis has focused his messages to the world this week on the importance of international cooperation and the sharing of resources in order to overcome the coronavirus pandemic and build a more equitable society.

On this episode of “Inside the Vatican,” America’s Vatican correspondent Gerard O’Connell and I discuss the vision Pope Francis laid out in his new “plan for rising up again.”

On this episode of “Inside the Vatican,” the hosts discuss the task force the pope has assembled to actualize his vision for a post-coronavirus world.

Celebrating Earth Day, which fell during the “Easter season of renewal, let us pledge to love and esteem the beautiful g...
04/22/2020
On 50th anniversary of Earth Day, Pope Francis calls for ‘ecological conversion’

Celebrating Earth Day, which fell during the “Easter season of renewal, let us pledge to love and esteem the beautiful gift of the Earth, our common home, and to care for all members of our human family,” he said during his livestreamed weekly general audience from the Vatican.

The pope dedicated his catechesis April 22 to a reflection on the human and Christian responsibility to care for the Earth, humanity’s common home.

In response to the Covid-19 pandemic, schools across the United States have moved from classroom learning to at-home or ...
04/22/2020
How has your family adapted to schooling at home?

In response to the Covid-19 pandemic, schools across the United States have moved from classroom learning to at-home or online instruction. America surveyed parents to see how their families have adapted to schooling at home.

America surveyed parents to see how their families have adapted to schooling at home.

Zimbabwe had recorded 23 coronavirus cases and three deaths as of April 16, but many fear that the true numbers could be...
04/22/2020
Will Zimbabwe be prepared if it suffers a major outbreak of Covid-19?

Zimbabwe had recorded 23 coronavirus cases and three deaths as of April 16, but many fear that the true numbers could be much higher because of the lack of Covid-19 testing capacity here.

Zimbabwe had recorded 23 coronavirus cases and three deaths as of April 16, but many fear that the true numbers could be much higher because of the lack of Covid-19 testing capacity here.

I am getting a window into the daily lives of my daughters, and I truly understand what my wife has always told me: Cath...
04/22/2020
With my daughters at home for school, I am finally getting a Catholic education

I am getting a window into the daily lives of my daughters, and I truly understand what my wife has always told me: Catholic schooling has defined her view of the world.

I am getting a window into the daily lives of my daughters, and I truly understand what my wife has always told me: Catholic schooling has defined her view of the world.

Many of us are asking: Why is this happening? How long will it last? Where is God in all of this? Thankfully, I hear the...
04/21/2020
Is God still good during the coronavirus pandemic?

Many of us are asking: Why is this happening? How long will it last? Where is God in all of this? Thankfully, I hear the soft and steady voice of my Colombian mother echo in my head, recalling those times when she would remind me that God is always there, that “Dios siempre está en control.”

For some, a deadly pandemic may confirm their disbelief in any higher power, writes Juan Vidal, but the picture is larger than what we can see with our eyes.

The classroom closures have meant that many parents are struggling to balance their own work with their new role as teac...
04/21/2020
How Catholic schools are serving immigrant families during the coronavirus pandemic

The classroom closures have meant that many parents are struggling to balance their own work with their new role as teachers during the Covid-19 pandemic. Parents are overwhelmed with schooling at home, according to Renée Baeza, principal of Queen of Peace. The school is doing its best to ease the transition. “Parents aren’t teachers,” she said. “They know that and we know that. We’re adjusting.”

Classroom closures have meant that many parents are struggling to balance their own work with their new role as teachers during the Covid-19 pandemic. Parents are overwhelmed.

Amateur chefs and wanna-be bakers have a lot more time to spend in the kitchen thanks to stay-at-home measures meant to ...
04/21/2020
Podcast: Meet the Franciscan who won ‘The Great American Baking Show’

Amateur chefs and wanna-be bakers have a lot more time to spend in the kitchen thanks to stay-at-home measures meant to slow the spread to the coronavirus. And this week’s Jesuitical guest has some great tips for upping your recipe game.

Listen now 🎧

Up your quarantine recipe game with Brother Andrew Corriente.

I’m caught in my longing to be with yousomewhere else, lost in the surge of ten million
04/21/2020
From This Distance

I’m caught in my longing to be with you
somewhere else, lost in the surge of ten million

I’m caught in my longing to be with you somewhere else.

On an Ash Wednesday in New Orleans, Evelyn Waugh witnessed “one of the most moving sights of my tour.” Filthy streets sh...
04/20/2020
What Evelyn Waugh saw in America (An Anglo-American romance)

On an Ash Wednesday in New Orleans, Evelyn Waugh witnessed “one of the most moving sights of my tour.” Filthy streets showed the excesses of carnival. Still, across the street a Jesuit church was “teeming with life all day long."

Noted for his acid tongue, Evelyn Waugh hated the United States and its citizens and let them know it. However, he felt more and more drawn to them on repeated visits.

04/20/2020
Fr. James Martin, SJ

Join Fr. James Martin, SJ, for his daily faith sharing!

Daily Faith Sharing: Spirit and Flesh (Jn 3:1-8). What does John mean by "flesh," why does Elizabeth Johnson remind us that the Word became not just "human," but 'flesh," and what does that say for creation?

Books mentioned: "Creation and the Cross," by Elizabeth Johnson, CSJ.

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Why am I not receiving my subscription lately?
A beautiful prayer. Thank you.
Que voulez-vous dire ?
Will you be live-streaming Mass from the Chapel again this Sunday?
It goes. I Hear You Calling Me Lord God called McCormack when he was a little lad. Next day he asked his loving mom and dad. If he should get into music or become a priest. They said music they music. I hear you calling me Lord. McCormack sang for the Pope and God long time ago. As he started so did World War two and he stayed to help protect the Pope and God. Yes he stayed to help protect the Pope and God. I hear you Calling me Lord. For those to be priest's nun's and brother's mom and dad will pray for you and we shall to. We shall to and God shall to. Well pray for you and God shall to. I hear you Calling me Lord. I hear you Calling me.
Yes. Ever hear of John McCormack? My great aunt sang his I Hear You Calling Me to the family. She had joined something to see him. No luck. I went to southern Ireland on tour with a friend . We got to athlone and none of the tour teams knew who he was. Thank God someone else on tour did. They pointed out his house which I ran to. It said Count John McCormack on top. I went in and this guy showed me around. Then he and I sang it. Then I found he's John Count McCormack jr.. I got sheet music to it at a flea market. I reworded it into I Hear You Calling Me Lord. John Michael Talbot was in town and I sang it to him and gave him a copy of the sheet music. He sang it to Pope Francis and he liked it big time. Pope Benedict xvi knew it was a McCormack . Before pope Francis asked me to become a nun. I can't because my mother is I'll. So he asked me to write a opera. Would you like the words to I Hear You Calling Me Lord? Its John McCormack's story then for others to be more active in the church.
I am convinced that Jesus would something just like this. Evangelicals, who say they follow Him, would cry socialism. Christ is an inconvenience to them. i could do better. So can we all.
Just Sharing....
Amen
Greetings and blessings to you, AM! I recall seeing a post that the staff at America Magazine were going to livestream Easter Sunday mass, but I can’t locate it now. Could you repost that information, please? We’d like to participate in that online worship community. Thank you, and a blessed Easter to you.
Great tribute to John Prine, Mr. Keane. Johnny was an original. One of a kind for sure.
https://www.americamagazine.org/arts-culture/2020/04/03/what-we-lost-when-notre-dame-de-paris-caught-fire Although I would prefer that Notre Dame de Paris be restored with its pre-19th century roof, Mr. Baxter's idea for glass and light amidst the darkness on Marian feasts has a lot of merit. I would like to emphasize some things which are implicit in the article but seem important to me. First, Gothic cathedrals were products of the wealthy with a large element of promoting themselves through cultural and artistic expression of their wealth, which is related to the second point that their Gothic churches were built in a era of religious performance for which they were settings, and they were not built to involve people in communal, liturgical prayer, but to attend and admire the achievements of others in performance and construction. I