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The Bunker Studio

The Bunker Studio Contact information, map and directions, contact form, opening hours, services, ratings, photos, videos and announcements from The Bunker Studio, Music production studio, New York, NY.

Operating as usual

Yes, we still track and mix using  whenever the need arises!.For artists who may be new to tape (perhaps deciding whethe...
12/06/2022

Yes, we still track and mix using whenever the need arises!
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For artists who may be new to tape (perhaps deciding whether to work in the medium for their next project), there are a few things to know
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One counterintuitive thing about is that many of its limitations can become advantages. The medium discourages (even precludes) endless takes, micro-editing, and interminable revision. But it rewards the confidence to accept and feature human imperfection
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It also precludes high track counts, which rewards artistic focus and arrangement-with-intent
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This is a better fit for some creative visions than others! But if an artist is looking to challenge a tendency to over-refine or over-add, the tape workflow can be a powerful eye-opener
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Very often something that’s initially deemed a flaw will become an essential feature if allowed to age a bit. Other times, the technical capacity for endless overdubs can delay a realization that the core of the production isn’t as strong as we wish. Tape is a powerful asset in these instances, as it encourages us to second-guess every punch, every edit, every overdub
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But enough tape for an entirely-analog project is expensive, and analog requires a and engineer with experience in the medium. This is enough to discourage most, but for those who want the experience, we have the equipment, facilities, and expertise to stay in the domain entirely from tracking to mastering (including two Studer multitracks and multiple Studer, Ampex and Otari stereo machines)!
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The   has been manufactured over the years in at least two colors, with at least two connectors, and sold under at least...
12/05/2022

The has been manufactured over the years in at least two colors, with at least two connectors, and sold under at least two trademarks!
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We have one with the logo, several with the logo, one in silver, several in black, one with a 3-pin “kleintuchel” DIN connector, and several with standard XLRs. Most of ours say “Made in Germany”; the rest say “Made in Western Germany.”
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We suppose some amount of variation is inevitable in 63 years of continuous production!
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They all sound great, though—right up until the present day, these little ribbon seem to sound as consistent as ever.
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A classic choice on cab, excellent on hi hat and under snare... we recently had great success with one on flute in a live tracking situation where bleed needed to be controlled. They’re just fantastic all-around !
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The right-side racks in the  A .The left side here is mostly effects—a  M7, a , , , , and a few others.There is also a r...
12/03/2022

The right-side racks in the A
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The left side here is mostly effects—a M7, a , , , , and a few others
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There is also a rackmount (a very useful device for us!) and a funky old Boss spring reverb
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Tucked below the is a pair of old RCA germanium-transistor mic preamps (model BA-31B)
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These are in what’s called a “cassette” form factor, and they originally plugged into a small broadcast console. They’re warm and characterful, and we love having them
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Over on the right are some of our in-house-made mic pres; a favorite for us on any kind of wind instrument and many other sources
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Below those are a with a variety of Moog filters, analog and digital delays, a de-esser, and other stuff
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On the opposite side of the room, there’s a similarly-sized rack that contains mostly dynamics processors and EQs
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Thanks to our partner , we now have quite a few of these vintage  equalizers, all housed in an eight-space power supply ...
12/02/2022

Thanks to our partner , we now have quite a few of these vintage equalizers, all housed in an eight-space power supply rack designed for their unique form factor
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These are the EQs on which the Sie-Q was modeled. That’s a great and useful plug-in, but in hardware trim they’re even more special
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At the far left, right at the edge of the frame, you see a couple of modules that are different (with additional k***s). These are BFE-branded units with the model number . They share the same form factor and were used often for disk mastering (lacquer cutting)
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They’ve been a fantastic addition to our
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W295b

The building in which our studio was built has a 19th century industrial past.We believe it was some sort of foundry—the...
12/01/2022

The building in which our studio was built has a 19th century industrial past
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We believe it was some sort of foundry—the concrete slab is an impressive four feet in thickness, which is a lot of mass!
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This is pretty good for preventing transmission from room to room, so we elected to build our studio directly on the slab (you can see the distressed painted concrete floor around the rug in this picture)
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For our newer Northward Acoustics mix and mastering rooms, we floated additional slabs (suspended above this one) for maximum isolation from the other spaces (we’re honestly not sure how much practical benefit this may have gained)
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Studio B is a little bit different—while under the same roof, the portion of the building under which it sits was constructed at a different time, so it doesn’t benefit from the super-massive slab
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Its floor has a little bit of “give” and allows a bit more transmission, so is theoretically a bit less-optimal. However, that live room might be the best sounding drum space in our whole facility, so perhaps a bit of luck was in our favor—the livelier floor is surely part of the “sauce”
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Not all  is exciting! This  houses a few essentials that we use in our .Top-left are several  that we often use in front...
11/30/2022

Not all is exciting! This houses a few essentials that we use in our
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Top-left are several that we often use in front of vocal mics. Pop filters are a surprisingly-deep (and surprisingly-contentious!) subject, and many have their favorites. Most agree that “none at all” is the best option when you can get away with it, but you almost always see them used in front of a vocal mic
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Pronouncing a hard “P” consonant (a ) creates a sudden blast of air that can make a loud pop or rushing-wind sound. Several other consonants do this to a lesser-degree. For some fragile ribbon microphones, this could even cause damage to the mic—so a preventative measure becomes advisable
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Single-layer nylon, two-layer nylon, metal flat, metal curved… all sound just a little bit different, but all have the same goal: to redirect sudden rushes of air from a vocalist’s mouth
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To their right we have several varietals of music stand lights—another unexciting-but-necessary studio item. Not pictured are our favorites, which actually clamp to the whole width of the stand and have an LED strip inside, powered by an external power supply. Players love these! We have them semi-permanently affixed to most of our stands
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The ones pictured here are simpler battery-powered LED devices that can work well enough in a pinch
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At the bottom of the frame are several specialized multi-conductor cables for tube mics. These will have a varying number of internal conductors and a shield, and will generally only work with the specific mic for which they were designed
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We’ve never owned a Roland , but have always been kind of curious about them. We picked up this inexpensive Klark-Teknik...
11/29/2022

We’ve never owned a Roland , but have always been kind of curious about them. We picked up this inexpensive Klark-Teknik reproduction, the , recently
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Roland/Boss has made some pretty fantastic choruses—the original Boss CE1 comes to mind, as does the inboard chorus on the Juno series of synths
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The Dimension D was a 2U rackmount unit with a very simple interface—a button to engage, and four buttons to engage different pre-set flavors of chorus
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The originals used the bucket-brigade chip, while the reproduction uses a similar substitute part. The device is essentially a series of transistors and capacitors that delays the signal by sequentially passing the voltage from one stage to the next
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The substitute part that Klark-Teknik chose runs on a lower-voltage supply rail than the original MN3007. This in and of itself shouldn’t change the sound significantly, but it does require some tweaks to adjust the modulation depth values and time constants. In some of the modes (especially “Mode 1”) it doesn’t quite get there
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The upshot is: the BBD-320 isn’t a one-for-one clone, but looks similar and functions pretty similarly. Dimension D connoisseurs won’t be parting with their originals in favor of one of these, but for those like us (who have plenty of ways to accomplish chorus already), it may be a better value than paying the ever-climbing price for a rare original unit
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When someone without a  background sees an  for the first time, they can often be overwhelmed by the number of k***s and...
11/26/2022

When someone without a background sees an for the first time, they can often be overwhelmed by the number of k***s and switches
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On more fully-featured desks (like the vintage in our , pictured here), even a single can seem a little overwhelming at first!
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The bullk of the heavy lifting in an channel is done by the portion in this detail shot of eight channels
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At the very top of the frame are the mic/line input amps (red k**b cap). While SSL isn’t really known for outstanding mic pres, these are perfectly adequate when you don’t need anything more esoteric than clean amplification, phantom power, and polarity-reversal
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Directly below are the dynamics processors (green and grey k**b caps, enclosed between two horizontal rule lines). This section is what set the apart when it was introduced, as it was the first console to include a and expander/gate on every single channel. The and expander in each strip share a (voltage-controlled amplifier) IC that does the heavy lifting—this was a fairly new technology in the 1980s
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Below is a very powerful parametric EQ—also a rarity on a console in this era. A allows the user to not only control the frequency of interest and the amount of boost/cut, but also the steepness or gentleness of that boost/cut (called quality factor, or “Q”)
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The channel strips extend beyond the frame on both ends—below the EQ are several sends (k***s that allow us to route a duplicate of the channel’s audio to effects devices or headphones), and above the mic preamp exists a routing matrix that allows us to send audio from any part of the desk to virtually any other
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Many of this particular console’s functions are unused by us in its current application—since it serves mix duty only, we rarely need mic preamps or other tracking functionality
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We love  microphones and have quite a few of them!.This picture shows an interesting detail of one of our favorites: the...
11/25/2022

We love microphones and have quite a few of them!
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This picture shows an interesting detail of one of our favorites: the .berlin
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This mic features four nickel membranes; essentially it’s two complete capsule assemblies stacked one above the other
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At the top of the head assembly is this notch that allows rotation of the top capsule assembly in relation to the lower one
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We usually just leave ours in a textbook X/Y coincident orientation, but it’d also be possible to face both capsules the exact same direction (or anywhere in-between)
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We have a few in our , including the very-similar , the large-diaphragm SM69FET, an AEA R88 (fantastic stereo ribbon), and more
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We have quite a few tape machines and aren’t at all hesitant to use them… but we also have a pair of  tape emulators by ...
11/24/2022

We have quite a few tape machines and aren’t at all hesitant to use them… but we also have a pair of tape emulators by designs (top center of the frame)
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The experience of using these isn’t quite the same as using an actual tape machine, but they do something incredibly useful in their own right
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They really prove useful in mix scenarios to add just a bit of excitement/interest when a source is coming back lackluster in some way
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They work really well to smooth out things that present a little on the harsh side, or to add some character to a capture that’s a bit sterile or bland
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They can be used in a manner that’s extremely subtle (“level to tape”, wet-dry mix, and various types of saturation are all variable), or they can be pushed a little
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Conventional wisdom blames  for a perceived reduction in quality at  in the mid-late 1960s.Reality is probably more comp...
11/22/2022

Conventional wisdom blames for a perceived reduction in quality at in the mid-late 1960s
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Reality is probably more complicated—most musical instrument companies saw a massive surge in demand as the entire boomer generation almost simultaneously became interested in picking up instruments (particularly in the wake of the Beatles’ popularity)
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Purportedly, one reason Leo Fender sold the company was due to the stress posed by too much growth pressure (including massive backorders on many models)
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A similar thing happened at Gibson around the same time—while their own corporate buyout (by Norlin, in ’68) is often blamed for slumping quality, things were already looking a bit frayed by the time Ted McCarty left in ’66
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Both companies (as well as others, like Ludwig and Gretsch) had to massively scale up operations to meet demand. This meant lots of new workforce, new facilities, efforts to maximize efficiency… all of which came with some growing pains
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Our ’68 Fender (on the right) here is functionally-identical to its earlier black-panel counterpart, and our mid-70s (left) is likewise little-changed
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The larger amp would have its circuit retired later the same year, but the smaller Princeton only saw a few component suppliers come and go throughout its run (the circuit remained)
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Both of these are fantastic amps, as are many instruments. There is something special about the low-production Leo-era, but these later amps and guitars have their own thing as well
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New York, NY
11211

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Recording with John Morgan Kimock, Eden Ladin, Andy Hess! At The Bunker Studio.
Great chemistry, great takes! We all got along well, no fights! Notable that my friends Jon and Aaron build this studio from the ground up, I recall talking about it even while we where seniors at New School. Now they are one of the best options around!
In and out! Fun couple of days in NYC! What a fun session at The Bunker Studio in BK w/ Nick Finzer big band! Also this section was FUN🔥🔥

See you next month New York! This time for good❤️

Tonight I’m playing at the Elephant Room w/ Christian Wiggs from 9pm-1am. See you there!



Yamaha Music USA Pickett Brass and Blackburn Trumpets Earasers earplugs Robinson's Remedies Outside in Music
This week’s is the perfect creative hideaway nestled deep in Brooklyn NYC. The Bunker Studio is a 3000sq ft complex owned and operated by musician/engineers John Davis and Aaron Nevezie, and was built to avoid the clinical, sterile feel the pair felt many high end studios had, whilst offering a level of acoustics and equipment far beyond the typical home studio setup. The result is a striking space with the acoustic flexibility to adapt to everything from rock bands to chamber orchestras – and one of the most accurate mixing environments you’ll find anywhere in the world.

Studio A easily allows for live tracking of large ensembles with excellent sight lines and isolation. The huge live room with 25ft ceilings, string and rhythm rooms and iso booth each have their own unique character and provide inspiring acoustic environments in which to play. The control room features a vintage Neve 8088 console plus an extensive selection of vintage and modern outboard, and some sweet Abbey Road-style custom REDD47 tube mic pres which are exclusive to the complex.

Studio B is a smaller tracking room, overdub and production studio with a large control room. The live room is 230sq ft with 12ft ceilings, and has hosted a range of tracking sessions from full rock/indie bands, bluegrass groups, horn sections to chamber ensembles. There’s a Neve 8058 in here, alongside an 8816 summing mixer offering 16 additional returns.

Elsewhere in the complex is an exceptional mix room featuring an SSL 4040E/G, ATC 110s and access to the plate room which features two EMT 140 plates and an AKG BX-20 spring reverb. The mastering room is home to engineers Alex DeTurk and Colin Bryson, allowing the studios to offer a full range of services from basic tracking through mixing and expert mastering.

For more info, click here: https://milocostudios.com/studios/the-bunker-studio/

Enquiries 📩 [email protected]
Psyched for the release of Brad Mehldau’s new album ‘Jacob’s Ladder’ on Nonesuch Records 🔥

I took the video above in my vocal booth at The Bunker Studio. Brad handed me a printout of a photo of the Penitent Magdalene by Donatello for inspiration. I looked in her eyes while I was singing Brad’s “Cogs in Cogs” Gentle Giant cover.

I also sang/screamed on these other ‘Jacob’s Ladder’ tunes below:
“Herr und Knecht”
“Entr’acte (Glam Prelude)
“Heaven (Pt. II, “Life Seeker”)

The second video is of me tracking vocals for Brad in “tree pose”. 🌴

You can purchase the album and receive a free piano score download via Brad’s website:
https://www.bradmehldau.com/
Run around NYC with us and catch clips of us in the studio at The Bunker Studio
Introducing the music video for:
S K Y S C R A P E R
https://youtu.be/7DRDFkHTyqw

Shot by us: Aaron and Jacque
Edited by: Kate Bennis
FINAL SINGLE OUT TODAY: COME ON KIKI! 🤍 https://emilywells.lnk.to/RegardsToTheEnd

“Come On Kiki” contains many images, beginning with the sculpture ‘Tied to Her Nature’ by the artist Kiki Smith. The song was written immediately after reading from ‘In the Shadow of the American Dreams: the Diaries of David Wojnarowicz’, in which Wojnarowicz describes dancing with Kiki Smith in the aftermath of their friend Peter Hujar’s death, though the song doesn’t tell this story. It tells, in part, my own, one of wanting more of exactly what I have, of desiring to move in time circularly, inside of all that has been experienced, and therefore gained. I was thinking a lot about Harry Nillson when arranging and recording: instruments and melodic phrases moving in and out of frame like dancers or extras in a play, set against the steady voice as storyteller. If I have a pet song on the album, this is it.

Live Drums: Mike Thies
Upright Bass: Evan Runyon
Bass Clarinet, Clarinet: Hideaki Aomori
French Horn: Jim Wells
Live drum recording engineered by Nolan Thies at The Bunker Studio
Aaron was tired of making computer constructed music so he put a band together.

November 1st of 2021, at The Bunker Studio in Brooklyn, we cut “Skyscraper” to the Studer 24 track tape machine with on guitar, on bass, on drums and producing the live session.

I pinch myself that these class act incredible talents touched this track. The dearest dudes I heart so much! Thank you! Thank you! Thank you!

Swipe ➡️ to see the making

Album shot by:
Shots in studio:
Dreaming of the spring
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0ftrGPwJADw

Archive footage edited by Clare Elliott
Song produced and mixed at New Warsaw Studio by Riley McMahon.
Recorded at The Bunker Studio in Brooklyn.

Spottiswoode: Lead vocals
John Young: bass
Tim Vaill: cymbals
Kevin Cordt: trumpet
Riley McMahon: mandolin
Tony Lauria: accordion
!! Beyond the Bomb x Melt - we are so excited to release a video of our song Walk to Midnight. We recorded this live version in our last hour of studio time The Bunker Studio this summer – the studio isn’t the only place where we run short on time though. Today the of the Atomic Scientists made their annual announcement of how much time remains until nuclear “midnight” via the . We're at 100 seconds, the closest to midnight that we've ever been. But, together, we can reverse the Walk to Midnight!

2022 spring tour + NEW SINGLE + Vinyl/CD preorders: https://emilywells.lnk.to/RegardsToTheEnd

I’ll be touring the US this spring, a handful of dates supporting the fabulous band Son Lux and headlining the rest. Tickets go on sale this Friday Jan. 14 at Noon EST. After two years (mostly) alone in my studio writing and recording this album I truly can’t wait to bring these songs fully to life through your ears, imaginations, and physical presence.

LOVE SAVES THE DAY out today! I joke that this song is my magnum opus because it took me several years to write the arrangements and complete. It has been stripped and redressed in various frocks of production but it wasn’t until I found my compositional voice for the new album that I knew how it was suppose to live. The cover is a painting, “April 14, 2018 (RIP David Buckel)” by an artist whom I deeply admire, Michael Stamm … more on that soon.

And, PREORDER Regards to the End now via my website. Find all the things at the link above!

Incredible insane performances on the clarinet, bass clarinet, and flute by Hideaki Aomori, the real star of this recording.
+ extreme delights and mind bending performances from Mike Thies on live drums which were engineered by Nolan Thies at The Bunker Studio + Topu Lyo on percussive piano & cello + Evan Runyon on upright bass + Jim Wells (my pops) on French horn + Damian Primis on bassoon. With production assistance from Chulo Records and mixed with Christopher Botta.

📷📷📷PHOTO by Rachel Stern
Happy New Year!
Here’s my little arrangement of John Coltrane’s ‘Impressions’ from Robby Ameen’s latest album ‘Diluvio’.
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Vandoren USAVandoren Musician's Advisory Studio NYCVandoren ParisPearl DrumsThe Bunker Studio
Beautiful way to end my studio dates for the year… Excited to share this one with you all soon. 😊
Troy Roberts 🎷 Paul Bollenback 🎸 John Patitucci 🎻 Jimmy Macbride 🥁….
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The Bunker Studio Vandoren Musician's Advisory Studio NYC Vandoren USA 📷 Anna Yatskevich
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