The Bunker Studio

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Sometimes it’s the little things that help keep a   running!We love these little hook-and-loop cable identifiers. We use...
08/11/2023

Sometimes it’s the little things that help keep a running!
We love these little hook-and-loop cable identifiers. We use them in our to help us manage the I/O of our instrument-level gear with our reamp modules

Some older   had their mic and line amps in “cassette” formatThese modules were designed to slide in and out (often on s...
08/10/2023

Some older had their mic and line amps in “cassette” format
These modules were designed to slide in and out (often on sleds) for easy replacement/repair
The BA-31B pictured here is an early solid-state preamp with transistors. It’s quite a sound! We have a pair and love them
It originally would’ve been installed in one of RCA’s consoles (whether for or )
Our pair live in a rack tray in our Studio A racks, and are nice when we want a different flavor from our Neve console pres or custom tube preamps
While consoles remained modular for the rest of the large-frame analog console era, later desks had modules top-mounted, with controls brought to the front panel, usually slotting in via edge connectors

We’ve really been loving our new .berlin   reissues in many applications, but inside our 19th century   C they’ve been p...
08/09/2023

We’ve really been loving our new .berlin reissues in many applications, but inside our 19th century C they’ve been perennial favorites
Fortunately, we can use a pair here and still have a pair left over for drum overheads (where they also excel, when appropriate). They also really shine on vocals, upright bass, strings… they’re really just fantastic
While we have a mix of vintage and new U67s, all four of our are the new reissue—and we really feel that have nailed it in every respect
The first question that tends to get asked is “do they sound *exactly* like the originals?” and as far as we can tell they more-or-less do… but that’s a tricky question
The old ones existed in several different revisions, components within them existed within tolerances (fairly significant tolerances, actually, for the capsules!), and have by now had well over half a century of repairs, maintenance, care, neglect, restoration, and modification
The M49v sonically exists squarely within the rather-diffuse target created by the motley vintage population… and more-importantly, are much closer in tolerance. We have two very good matched pairs (and, truthfully, all are close enough to use interchangeably)
We have little doubt that someone might find a particular vintage example that’s possessed of some special quality, but these reissues are done so well we’d happily take them over a randomly-selected vintage example… especially when we get the reliability and consistency benefits of brand new mics

There’s something beautiful about the   k***s and switches on a vintage  This is the center section of our  , but the la...
08/08/2023

There’s something beautiful about the k***s and switches on a vintage
This is the center section of our , but the larger in Studio A looks quite similar
In addition to the stock rotary “group output” faders (bus outs), the monitor controller and many routing functions are contained here
Rotary controls for control room monitors and studio loudspeakers feature prominently in the lower left. We’ve had people ask before what we mean by “studio loudspeakers” (SLS)
Studio loudspeakers are just a set of additional mains mounted out in the live room. This functionality is less-essential now than it was in earlier eras of , but still comes in quite handy
If an ensemble is recording live-in-the-room together, they may elect not to use headphones. SLS would be used in this instance for talkback, slating takes, etc.
In some earlier eras, it wasn’t uncommon to use SLS for monitoring for orchestra overdubs, accepting a small amount of bleed
They can also be convenient for playing back takes for the musicians to evaluate—we often used ours in this capacity when, during peak pandemic, we were under our strictest social-distancing protocols

Our  MkVI with the hood upThe newer digital   are much more convenient to use, offer lots of sounds, and sound great—esp...
08/07/2023

Our MkVI with the hood up
The newer digital are much more convenient to use, offer lots of sounds, and sound great—especially for live performance applications
But we remain attached to the original technology of self-rewinding tape
There’s something different about interacting with the half-century-old mechanical engineering that comprises this instrument
Being a newer unit, it functions quite reliably, and hits a sweet spot between a creaky vintage Mellotron and a more-homogeneous digital recreation
It still has plenty of quirks with which to interact, but it’s nice and quiet and the notes mostly sound when you want them to

If we could have only one  , the .berlin   would be a serious contenderIt sounds good on so many things—ours finds its w...
08/05/2023

If we could have only one , the .berlin would be a serious contender
It sounds good on so many things—ours finds its way onto piano, drum overhead, acoustic and electric guitars, upright bass, woodwinds, strings, vocal… they excel in so many applications
We have five and it never feels like too many!

Each of our tracking spaces has a different acoustic character, and we’ve recorded   in just about all of them at one ti...
08/04/2023

Each of our tracking spaces has a different acoustic character, and we’ve recorded in just about all of them at one time or another
Here’s one of our vintage kits set up in our large Studio A
This space has a fairly live character with ceilings that twist and vault up to about twenty-five feet at the apex. The wood slats that cover soft acoustic treatment behind are spaced moderately close together to bring a bit of controlled life to the space
Our Studio B live room, by comparison, is considerably smaller and tighter, with far more exposed soft surfaces
We’ve even recorded drums in our Studio A iso booth, which is just barely large enough for a small kit (and is probably the deadest/tightest space of all)
In addition to these options, we can tailor the sound in each individual space by placing gobos around the kit, usually with the soft side facing the drums. Our tallest gobos around a kit in our biggest live room is a common sight, as is an array of smaller gobos around a kit in our tighter Studio A rhythm room

These  digitally-controlled patchbays are the heart of our new   setupInstead of large TT patchbays where we physically ...
08/03/2023

These digitally-controlled patchbays are the heart of our new setup
Instead of large TT patchbays where we physically plug in cables to connect different pieces of gear, we use these to seamlessly connect our outboard gear to insert points
The crosspoint switch arrays inside are digitally-controlled. This means we can simply drag and drop chains of gear into an insert point, bypass them, reorder them, and anything else we’d do with a conventional jack-and-cable system (using a graphical user interface that lives alongside our DAWs)
The larger Flock Patch XT is used for the outboard gear in our racks, while the smaller unit allows us to create chains for the eight stereo buses that make up our custom 16x2 multibus solution
All of this is designed to bring our workflow to the cutting edge of routing technology without giving up the large collection of prized vintage gear that has become central to our identity

An interesting bass setup from a few months back. This session was minimally-mic’d and recorded analog via our Studer A8...
08/02/2023

An interesting bass setup from a few months back. This session was minimally-mic’d and recorded analog via our Studer A800
—so three channels for bass wasn’t an afterthought, but a well-considered move
We believe this was ’s session, perhaps he’ll add thoughts about the stereo condenser. The is self-explanaory… we’ve recorded many, many great-sounding bass tracks using that one mic alone
It’s hard to go too far wrong with vintage .berlin tube condensers like these!

We love  and rely on at least one pair in every roomMonitoring is a matter of personal preference and nothing is for eve...
08/01/2023

We love and rely on at least one pair in every room

Monitoring is a matter of personal preference and nothing is for everybody, but we love how great the ATCs are in the critical midrange
We’re not loudspeaker designers, but we do know that ATC monitors, in addition to having excellent midrange drivers, exhibit measurably lower harmonic distortion in the bottom end than many alternatives
While distortion can be perceived as exciting, spurious harmonics of low frequencies can cloud the midrange, upon which balances and translation hinge
The smallest ATCs we have are these in Studio B. Paired with a sub (or without) they’re a great reference in this control room
Studio A and ’s have SCM45A pairs, the latter flush-mounted in wall for extended low-frequency bandwidth
Our larger and rooms were both designed by and feature the largest we have: the
These big mains are suspension-mounted with their faces flush with the front wall, which nets maximum performance

  stands for “Akustische und Kino-Geräte Gesellschaft,” which translates to “Acoustic and Cinema Equipment”The company s...
07/31/2023

stands for “Akustische und Kino-Geräte Gesellschaft,” which translates to “Acoustic and Cinema Equipment”
The company started in Vienna, Austria in the late 1940s by a physicist and an engineer in partnership (with the goal of supplying film equipment to cinemas)
Their business quickly diversified into all manner of commercial electronics—everything from car horns to intercom systems
In this process of diversification, they begun making microphones and loudspeakers—first for telecommunications (crude carbon microphones for telephone handsets), and eventually for professional
In one watershed year in the early 1950s, AKG changed the game forever with the introduction of two microphones: the D12 and C12
The was revolutionary in that it was the world’s first cardioid moving-coil dynamic mic
The became and remains one of the best condenser ever designed and manufactured—period examples command prices well into five figures on the vintage market. Many recording engineers feel it has never been equalled (much less surpassed)
The three microphones in this picture date from slightly later in AKG’s history, but are still important and influential. The original silver (top-right) was the FET successor to the legendary C12, and retains its stunning edge-terminated capsule
The C414-B-ULS (top-left) is in turn a successor to the original C414, and was produced in staggering numbers. It has a different capsule and is missing a touch of the magic, but it remains a useful workhorse in its own right
The small-diaphragm condenser is pretty much interchangeable with the that was introduced in the 1960s. A modular design with modular capsules, it's commonly seen with the CK1 cap (installed here). These were discontinued in the mid-1990s. While they were recently reissued, the reissue is a bit different and we prefer the older version

We love old   drums and   micsWe have quite a few of each, and they essentially get used dailyThis old   kit is a mainst...
07/29/2023

We love old drums and mics
We have quite a few of each, and they essentially get used daily
This old kit is a mainstay, and sounds great in this room with overheads

Toward the back of our   sits a little auxiliary rack with some stuff that we like to patch in, but don’t need to manipu...
07/28/2023

Toward the back of our sits a little auxiliary rack with some stuff that we like to patch in, but don’t need to manipulate too often. This is only a small part of what’s in there
We’ve got four EXT-C modules that we use to patch in instrument-level gear like tape echoes, our Mu-Tron Biphase, and other guitar pedals
The EXT-C s great for showing those devices the levels and impedances they need to interface well with a pro audio environment, and they include a wet/dry blend and in/out trims for gain stage management
Also in this frame are a pair of Standard Audio -Or compressors. These are inspired by the old Shure , a speech/announce compressor that absolutely destroys audio signal with overcompression and distortion. While a bit noisy (just like the originals), we love them on some sources, often in parallel
An Audio NT-02A saturator, a , and a rackmount sit below
The Overstayer, in particular, is fantastic and many of us find ourselves using it somewhere on almost every mix. The Transient Designer is an incredibly unique device that’s great for shaping the attack and sustain of a source. It’s not a compressor or gate—it works entirely differently from conventional dynamics processors, and is a very powerful tool

We recently mentioned that we sometimes combine   ribbons and .berlin condensers as  , and here’s one such setupThis is ...
07/27/2023

We recently mentioned that we sometimes combine ribbons and .berlin condensers as , and here’s one such setup
This is one of our two pairs of M49V (reissue ) configured as a near-coincident pair, with a situated in-between
is a mic technique that dates from the mid-20th century (late 1950s, likely) at the Office de Radiodiffusion Télévision Française (from which it derives its acronymic name)
Strict ORTF technique specifies a spacing of 17cm between the cardioid capsules, with a 110-degree angle in between
We can’t swear that this picture represents a fully measured-out and protracted example of the precise technique… sometimes “close enough” is close enough for us… but it certainly exemplifies the broad concept of near-coincident stereo
Stereo imaging only results when two channels have small differences, and there are two broad types with which we’re concerned: time-of-arrival and sound pressure level
A theoretical perfect coincident pair would have the microphone capsules occupying the same physical space, but practical arrangements just place them as closely-together as possible. This minimizes time-of-arrival differences and leans on differences in sound pressure (“volume”) between the two mics to create the stereo image
A spaced pair, on the other hand, is as its name applies—since the mics occupy different points in space, any source not exactly equidistant from the two will arrive at one mic sooner than the other (creating time-of-arrival, or phase differences). This creates a “wider” stereo, but has poorer mono compatibility
Near-coincident arrays like the one seen here offer a form of compromise (and the addition of a mono center mic will improve mono compatibility further, if that’s a consideration)

Part of the aux module of the  The Neve’s two banks of aux sends are each configured as two mono sends and a stereo pair...
07/26/2023

Part of the aux module of the
The Neve’s two banks of aux sends are each configured as two mono sends and a stereo pair. These first four show this clearly: Aux 3/4 has a single level k**b and a pan pot (push for pre-fader!)
Above that bank of four k***s sits a three-position toggle switch that allows you to set whether the input is in “mic” or “line”
The center position leaves the channel in its default configuration, which is set by the console’s operating mode (selected by a pushbutton switch on the center section)
When the console is in “remix” mode, all channels default to line operation, but this can be overridden by moving the toggle to the right (a red status LED indicates clearly that the channel’s mic input is active)
When in its inline tracking mode, all inputs default to “mic,” but individual channels can have their default mode overridden by moving the switch to “line” (left position). A green status LED makes this clear

Who knows what vintage instrument this panel is from?Hints: these buttons trigger playback of pre-recorded material, and...
07/25/2023

Who knows what vintage instrument this panel is from?
Hints: these buttons trigger playback of pre-recorded material, and the company that made it also made the namesake toy of a currently-popular feature film

There were two main finishes offered by .berlin for the   series of mics: a matte nickel, and a matte blackOn the left h...
07/24/2023

There were two main finishes offered by .berlin for the series of mics: a matte nickel, and a matte black
On the left here are a and in matte nickel, and on the right are those same two in black
The nickel finish could probably be considered the classical Neumann design language, and is probably a bit more commonly-seen. The black was useful for film or TV sets when the mic was intended to look less-conspicuous
Other than the finish on the outside, the function is identical on both and we use them interchangeably

The choice of   shapes the capture of the drum kit in a huge wayOne of our favorites is the  , pictured here. This class...
07/22/2023

The choice of shapes the capture of the drum kit in a huge way
One of our favorites is the , pictured here. This classic British is characterized by a fullness of tone with an elegantly-restrained top end. It doesn’t have the brilliant, airy detail of a Neumann or AKG condenser, but it’s extremely flattering to drums and cymbals that are played with power and authority
Other favorites of ours tend mostly toward the condenser family, and include Neumann M49Vs, U67s, and the Schoeps CMC6/Mk4 combo. All of those are fantastic choices for drums played with subtlety and nuance
Obviously it’s not a binary decision—we’ll frequently combine the two (ribbons in stereo with a mono condenser, or vice-versa!), and all are such good mics that setting them up will tend to get you some flavor of “excellent”

A couple of   standards and a less-known   unit: the   dynamics processorThese devices represent technologies from decad...
07/21/2023

A couple of standards and a less-known unit: the dynamics processor
These devices represent technologies from decades apart: vacuum tubes in the Manley gear and digitally-controlled VCAs in the Drawmer
The different technologies manifest not only in the sound, but in the user interface. The has copious buttons, a two-row LCD screen, and a lot of menuing
It’s somewhat telling that chapter two of the Drawmer’s manual is called “Finding Your Way Around.” While intuitive enough once you get the hang of it, it’s definitely not as straightforward as the Manley devices’ k***s and toggle switches
The tradeoff is that it has many more functions and excellent repeatability. It could almost be considered a dynamics-focused multi-effects, as it can do compression, limiting, expansion, gating, auto-panning, de-essing and auto-fading
The Manleys, of course, are more limited in function and just focus on sounding fantastic

The four inputs of our    The   is one of the most iconic bass amps of all time, and it went through several revisions—s...
07/20/2023

The four inputs of our
The is one of the most iconic bass amps of all time, and it went through several revisions—some of which have little in common with others!
Ours is the very last version—it has a bit more power on tap than the earlier ones, a larger cabinet (still with the single 15” speaker), and a somewhat different tone
It retains the signature design: the amp’s head latches to the cabinet upside-down for transport, right-side-up when in use
There were probably at least half a dozen B15 configurations over the years—cabinets moved among double-baffle ported, single-baffle, and Thiele ported. Power supplies flip-flopped from tube to solid-state rectifiers. Power amps switched between cathode-bias and fixed bias. Construction evolved from eyelet-board to printed circuit board. The circuit on our B-15S is substantially-different from the very first B-15N
But all of the vintage versions are superlative recording amps, bar none (a whole lot of people would allege that they’re the best recording bass amp!)

The humble     was manufactured for nearly a quarter-century… a most impressive run for a   studio monitor!Introduced in...
07/19/2023

The humble was manufactured for nearly a quarter-century… a most impressive run for a studio monitor!
Introduced in the late 1970s as a small bookshelf speaker, it was finally discontinued in the early 21st century (Yamaha cited difficulty sourcing the wood pulp needed for the famous white cones)
A staggering 200,000-plus pairs were sold over its run, which is why they’re not too hard to find (even two decades after their discontinuance)
Monitors come in and out of fashion, but the always seems to be in the fray, in large part due to its objectively-excellent time-domain performance
Unlike many small nearfields (which may boast more impressive power-handling, efficiency, and linearity), the NS-10M starts and stops quickly over its entire bandwidth. This is not as easy as it sounds, and it’s far more important than may be assumed!
With so many excellent monitors on the market, it can be easy to think of the NS10 as “Dad’s nearfield,” but this humble speaker has a few things left to teach us. It’s a superior tool for balancing, it translates well, and is very revealing of issues in the critical midrange
It may be the most polarizing speaker ever made—some love them, others love to hate them, but few are indifferent. It’s been our experience that once someone comes to understand how and why the NS10 is useful, they tend to return to them over and over

Throwback to a dual-piano session in   AThis   upright lives in Studio B most of the time, but was on loan to the A room...
07/18/2023

Throwback to a dual-piano session in A
This upright lives in Studio B most of the time, but was on loan to the A room for a session that wanted the sound of both grand and
We also have a console-sized Sohmer upright that lives just outside of Studio A and is on a wheeled dolly for ease of relocation
The grand piano is of course our 19th century C, a large piano with gorgeous low end. It was fully rebuilt a few years ago and is impeccably maintained by

This is the brightest-sounding and second-smallest of four distinct acoustic environments in our   A: our  Structurally,...
07/10/2023

This is the brightest-sounding and second-smallest of four distinct acoustic environments in our A: our
Structurally, it’s built to be extremely rigid. Treatment-wise, the pine slats that overlay the absorptive surface of the walls are more closely-spaced in here than in the other tracking spaces.
The structural rigidity and larger proportion of reflective surfaces make this room bright and lively.
The ceiling vaults up to about sixteen feet, and by removing the latched-in partition at the front, the space can be coupled directly to our larger .
In addition to acoustic stringed instruments, it works very well for horns, acoustic piano (especially when a bright character is desired), electric guitars, basses, organ, and many other sources.
We have no shortage of soft gobos for those occasions when the space needs to be deadened down a bit. It has great sight lines to the other three spaces—the live room, rhythm room, and iso booth.

For a  , it’s pretty hard to beat a very large   consoleOur largest, in studio A, has forty-eight inputs. Particularly w...
07/08/2023

For a , it’s pretty hard to beat a very large console
Our largest, in studio A, has forty-eight inputs. Particularly when supplemented by a dozen or more outboard preamps that live in our racks, that’s enough to satisfy the largest simultaneous track counts we encounter in our facility
The half-sized sibling (Studio B’s ) is pretty much exactly the same, just with half the number of inputs. Its smaller footprint is perfect for that smaller tracking/production environment
The most important part of these desks, from our perspective, is the classic input module, which contains the and EQ
While these modules are sometimes removed and racked up (and perform very well in that capacity, if the job is done right) there seems to be a little extra something when they’re in the desk, as-designed
For one thing, when installed in the console, the load impedance on the output of the module will be exactly what the designer wanted. Since things like Zobel networks on output transformers may be calculated with a specific load impedance in mind, this makes a difference
While this desk has a automation system installed, it’s rarely used. Most of our is done in our dedicated Northward Acoustics , and Studio A is very in-demand for tracking due to its large, excellent-sounding acoustic spaces

Here’s a selection of   that lives on the right side of our   deskThe racks built into either side of our desk contain g...
07/07/2023

Here’s a selection of that lives on the right side of our desk
The racks built into either side of our desk contain gear that we use for submix processing in our 16x2 hybrid setup
Three large racks elsewhere in the room (five bays total) house the gear we use for hardware inserts
At the bottom of this rack is the we use for summing on a temporary basis (while we await a custom summing solution). This is where our eight submix pairs get summed to a final stereo

We love these   and   EQs!This rack lives in our newly-configured  , and the EQs are accessible as hardware inserts usin...
07/06/2023

We love these and EQs!
This rack lives in our newly-configured , and the EQs are accessible as hardware inserts using our large digital patchbays—no patch cables required!
Audio gear of the 20th century was a little bit more regionalized than it is today—it could be meaningful to talk about “British” mic preamps, “German” or “Austrian” condenser mics, or “American” ribbon mics. There could often be real regional commonalities between gear of a certain type, even across different manufacturers
The six EQs further down the frame were designed and made by European electronics conglomerate Siemens; The two in the foreground by BFE. We can’t say for sure whether BFE (and these EQs) were related to Siemens (someone in the comments probably knows!), but the chassis fit the same form factor and have the same power supply requirements. It’s obvious that they were made to fit some of the same hardware
This isn’t necessarily evidence of common origin, however—regional standardization was very much a thing, and once a large state broadcast house (or similar) adopted a standard, other manufacturers were of course incentivized to design gear that would swap in easily
Famously, Neumann had to design a variant of the U67—the M269—because the German state broadcast outfit had standardized all of their power supplies to work with AC701k-equipped mics. The U67, with its EF86 tube, had different power requirements and thus didn’t fit the system. Since that was a very large contract, Neumann was quite interested in accommodating them!

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Recording with John Morgan Kimock, Eden Ladin, Andy Hess! At The Bunker Studio.
Great chemistry, great takes! We all got along well, no fights! Notable that my friends Jon and Aaron build this studio from the ground up, I recall talking about it even while we where seniors at New School. Now they are one of the best options around!
In and out! Fun couple of days in NYC! What a fun session at The Bunker Studio in BK w/ Nick Finzer big band! Also this section was FUN🔥🔥

See you next month New York! This time for good❤️

Tonight I’m playing at the Elephant Room w/ Christian Wiggs from 9pm-1am. See you there!



Yamaha Music USA Pickett Brass and Blackburn Trumpets Earasers earplugs Robinson's Remedies Outside in Music
This week’s is the perfect creative hideaway nestled deep in Brooklyn NYC. The Bunker Studio is a 3000sq ft complex owned and operated by musician/engineers John Davis and Aaron Nevezie, and was built to avoid the clinical, sterile feel the pair felt many high end studios had, whilst offering a level of acoustics and equipment far beyond the typical home studio setup. The result is a striking space with the acoustic flexibility to adapt to everything from rock bands to chamber orchestras – and one of the most accurate mixing environments you’ll find anywhere in the world.

Studio A easily allows for live tracking of large ensembles with excellent sight lines and isolation. The huge live room with 25ft ceilings, string and rhythm rooms and iso booth each have their own unique character and provide inspiring acoustic environments in which to play. The control room features a vintage Neve 8088 console plus an extensive selection of vintage and modern outboard, and some sweet Abbey Road-style custom REDD47 tube mic pres which are exclusive to the complex.

Studio B is a smaller tracking room, overdub and production studio with a large control room. The live room is 230sq ft with 12ft ceilings, and has hosted a range of tracking sessions from full rock/indie bands, bluegrass groups, horn sections to chamber ensembles. There’s a Neve 8058 in here, alongside an 8816 summing mixer offering 16 additional returns.

Elsewhere in the complex is an exceptional mix room featuring an SSL 4040E/G, ATC 110s and access to the plate room which features two EMT 140 plates and an AKG BX-20 spring reverb. The mastering room is home to engineers Alex DeTurk and Colin Bryson, allowing the studios to offer a full range of services from basic tracking through mixing and expert mastering.

For more info, click here: https://milocostudios.com/studios/the-bunker-studio/

Enquiries 📩 [email protected]
Psyched for the release of Brad Mehldau’s new album ‘Jacob’s Ladder’ on Nonesuch Records 🔥

I took the video above in my vocal booth at The Bunker Studio. Brad handed me a printout of a photo of the Penitent Magdalene by Donatello for inspiration. I looked in her eyes while I was singing Brad’s “Cogs in Cogs” Gentle Giant cover.

I also sang/screamed on these other ‘Jacob’s Ladder’ tunes below:
“Herr und Knecht”
“Entr’acte (Glam Prelude)
“Heaven (Pt. II, “Life Seeker”)

The second video is of me tracking vocals for Brad in “tree pose”. 🌴

You can purchase the album and receive a free piano score download via Brad’s website:
https://www.bradmehldau.com/
Run around NYC with us and catch clips of us in the studio at The Bunker Studio
Introducing the music video for:
S K Y S C R A P E R
https://youtu.be/7DRDFkHTyqw

Shot by us: Aaron and Jacque
Edited by: Kate Bennis
FINAL SINGLE OUT TODAY: COME ON KIKI! 🤍 https://emilywells.lnk.to/RegardsToTheEnd

“Come On Kiki” contains many images, beginning with the sculpture ‘Tied to Her Nature’ by the artist Kiki Smith. The song was written immediately after reading from ‘In the Shadow of the American Dreams: the Diaries of David Wojnarowicz’, in which Wojnarowicz describes dancing with Kiki Smith in the aftermath of their friend Peter Hujar’s death, though the song doesn’t tell this story. It tells, in part, my own, one of wanting more of exactly what I have, of desiring to move in time circularly, inside of all that has been experienced, and therefore gained. I was thinking a lot about Harry Nillson when arranging and recording: instruments and melodic phrases moving in and out of frame like dancers or extras in a play, set against the steady voice as storyteller. If I have a pet song on the album, this is it.

Live Drums: Mike Thies
Upright Bass: Evan Runyon
Bass Clarinet, Clarinet: Hideaki Aomori
French Horn: Jim Wells
Live drum recording engineered by Nolan Thies at The Bunker Studio
Aaron was tired of making computer constructed music so he put a band together.

November 1st of 2021, at The Bunker Studio in Brooklyn, we cut “Skyscraper” to the Studer 24 track tape machine with on guitar, on bass, on drums and producing the live session.

I pinch myself that these class act incredible talents touched this track. The dearest dudes I heart so much! Thank you! Thank you! Thank you!

Swipe ➡️ to see the making

Album shot by:
Shots in studio:
Dreaming of the spring
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0ftrGPwJADw

Archive footage edited by Clare Elliott
Song produced and mixed at New Warsaw Studio by Riley McMahon.
Recorded at The Bunker Studio in Brooklyn.

Spottiswoode: Lead vocals
John Young: bass
Tim Vaill: cymbals
Kevin Cordt: trumpet
Riley McMahon: mandolin
Tony Lauria: accordion
!! Beyond the Bomb x Melt - we are so excited to release a video of our song Walk to Midnight. We recorded this live version in our last hour of studio time The Bunker Studio this summer – the studio isn’t the only place where we run short on time though. Today the of the Atomic Scientists made their annual announcement of how much time remains until nuclear “midnight” via the . We're at 100 seconds, the closest to midnight that we've ever been. But, together, we can reverse the Walk to Midnight!

2022 spring tour + NEW SINGLE + Vinyl/CD preorders: https://emilywells.lnk.to/RegardsToTheEnd

I’ll be touring the US this spring, a handful of dates supporting the fabulous band Son Lux and headlining the rest. Tickets go on sale this Friday Jan. 14 at Noon EST. After two years (mostly) alone in my studio writing and recording this album I truly can’t wait to bring these songs fully to life through your ears, imaginations, and physical presence.

LOVE SAVES THE DAY out today! I joke that this song is my magnum opus because it took me several years to write the arrangements and complete. It has been stripped and redressed in various frocks of production but it wasn’t until I found my compositional voice for the new album that I knew how it was suppose to live. The cover is a painting, “April 14, 2018 (RIP David Buckel)” by an artist whom I deeply admire, Michael Stamm … more on that soon.

And, PREORDER Regards to the End now via my website. Find all the things at the link above!

Incredible insane performances on the clarinet, bass clarinet, and flute by Hideaki Aomori, the real star of this recording.
+ extreme delights and mind bending performances from Mike Thies on live drums which were engineered by Nolan Thies at The Bunker Studio + Topu Lyo on percussive piano & cello + Evan Runyon on upright bass + Jim Wells (my pops) on French horn + Damian Primis on bassoon. With production assistance from Chulo Records and mixed with Christopher Botta.

📷📷📷PHOTO by Rachel Stern
Happy New Year!
Here’s my little arrangement of John Coltrane’s ‘Impressions’ from Robby Ameen’s latest album ‘Diluvio’. . .
Vandoren USAVandoren Musician's Advisory Studio NYCVandoren ParisPearl DrumsThe Bunker Studio
Beautiful way to end my studio dates for the year… Excited to share this one with you all soon. 😊
Troy Roberts 🎷 Paul Bollenback 🎸 John Patitucci 🎻 Jimmy Macbride 🥁…. . .
The Bunker Studio Vandoren Musician's Advisory Studio NYC Vandoren USA 📷 Anna Yatskevich
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