Farrar, Straus and Giroux

Farrar, Straus and Giroux was founded in 1946 by Roger W. Straus. The firm is renowned for its international list of literary fiction, nonfiction, poetry and children's books. Farrar, Straus and Giroux authors have won extraordinary acclaim over the years, including numerous National Book Awards, Pulitzer Prizes, and twenty-one Nobel Prizes in literature. Nobel Prize-winners include Knut Hamsun, Hermann Hesse, T. S. Eliot, Pär Lagerkvist, François Mauriac, Juan Ramón Jiménez, Salvatore Quasimodo, Nelly Sachs, Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn, Pablo Neruda, Eugenio Montale, Isaac Bashevis Singer, Czeslaw Milosz, Elias Canetti, William Golding, Wole Soyinka, Joseph Brodsky, Camilo José Cela, Nadine Gordimer, Derek Walcott, and Seamus Heaney. Poetry has always played a pivotal role on the Farrar, Straus and Giroux list, which boasts some of the greatest names in modern verse, ranging from Elizabeth Bishop, Ted Hughes, and Philip Larkin to John Ashbery, Thom Gunn, and Les Murray. Fiction has an even greater international reach, distinguished by Michael Cunningham, Jonathan Franzen, Peter Høeg, Amitav Ghosh, Roberto Bolaño, Denis Johnson, Jamaica Kincaid, Marilynne Robinson, Bernard Malamud, Alice McDermott, Péter Nádas, Flannery O'Connor, Walker Percy, Richard Powers, Susan Sontag, Scott Turow, Mario Vargas Llosa, and Tom Wolfe. History, art history, natural history, current affairs and science round out a strong list in nonfiction represented by Thomas Friedman, Philip Gourevitch, George Packer, Alex Ross, Michael Holroyd, William Langewiesche, Gina Kolata, Louis Menand, and John McPhee, among others.

"Flores gives us a near-future that is often fun and rollicking, but he’s never afraid to show us the reality that is al...
05/16/2019
Permeable Borders: Tears of the Trufflepig by Fernando A. Flores

"Flores gives us a near-future that is often fun and rollicking, but he’s never afraid to show us the reality that is all-too-close to the world we’re living in right now."

Tor.com on TEARS OF THE TRUFFLEPIG by Fernando A. Flores.

There is a lot of book packed into Tears of the Trufflepig. There’s a story of grief that may prove unshakeable. A story of political and economic oppression. A story of environmental catastrophe, …

When Did Moral Clarity Become Radical? The Green New Deal has been called a political “loser.” But back in 1988, both pa...
05/14/2019
Opinion | When Did Moral Clarity Become Radical?

When Did Moral Clarity Become Radical? The Green New Deal has been called a political “loser.” But back in 1988, both parties saw climate legislation as sensible.

Read LOSING EARTH author Nathaniel Rich's Op-Ed for The New York Times.

The Green New Deal has been called a political “loser.” But back in 1988, both parties saw climate legislation as sensible.

The New York Times just broke the news that Chelsea Manning is writing a memoir, which we'll be publishing winter of 202...
05/13/2019
‘I’m Really Opening Myself Up’: Chelsea Manning Signs Book Deal

The New York Times just broke the news that Chelsea Manning is writing a memoir, which we'll be publishing winter of 2020!

"I’m really opening myself up to some really intimate things in this book, some really very personal moments."

The former intelligence analyst, who served seven years in prison for leaking classified information, views her memoir as a coming-of-age story.

"Usually, I catch melodies and chords first. But this time, the words came first."After reading THE LIGHT YEARS by Chris...
05/13/2019
An Exclusive Gateway to the Secrets of Life

"Usually, I catch melodies and chords first. But this time, the words came first."

After reading THE LIGHT YEARS by Chris Rush, musician and songwriter Carl Broemel, a member of the band My Morning Jacket, felt inspired to write the song “Face of the Earth.” The song appears on his new EP Brokenhearted Jubilee. Rush and Broemel exchanged questions about their creative influences, how Rush’s book inspired Broemel, and tarot cards.

After reading The Light Years by Chris Rush, musician and songwriter Carl Broemel, a member of the band My Morning Jacket, felt inspired to write the song "Face of the Earth." The song appears on his new EP Brokenhearted Jubilee. Rush and Broemel exchanged questions about their creative influences,....

THE UNPASSING author Chia-Chia Lin writes for The Paris Review's One Word column, on the word "understand." "When someon...
05/13/2019
One Word: Understand

THE UNPASSING author Chia-Chia Lin writes for The Paris Review's One Word column, on the word "understand."

"When someone says in conversation, 'I understand,' I’ve never felt that they understood much. It’s my hunch that the people who say 'I understand' to me, in fact, understand the least. If only they understood that they didn’t understand, we would all feel less alone. If you remove the letter s from the word understand, you can rearrange the letters to spell the word redundant. One small slash of the pen, and you reveal that the whole word is useless."

Those who say “I understand,” often understand the least.

Happy Mother's Day! The New York Times Books reviews MOTHER IS A VERB by Sarah Knott, a look at pregnancy and mothering ...
05/12/2019
A Historian Looks at Pregnancy and Mothering Through the Ages

Happy Mother's Day! The New York Times Books reviews MOTHER IS A VERB by Sarah Knott, a look at pregnancy and mothering through the ages:

In “Mother Is a Verb,” Sarah Knott casts light on forgotten beliefs and practices that will help readers place their own views in cultural context.

"I feel like in the world we live in, the patriarchal world, women are most valued for their sexuality and their motherh...
05/11/2019
Lubrication And Lots Of Communication: Navigating A New Sexual Life After Menopause

"I feel like in the world we live in, the patriarchal world, women are most valued for their sexuality and their motherhood," Steinke says. "Once menopause comes, there's a feeling of shame that comes for a lot of women."

NPR All Things Considered interviews FLASH COUNT DIARY author Darcey Steinke.

A new book, Flash Count Diary, celebrates the emotional and creative freedom of postmenopausal intimacy. Author Darcey Steinke is here to say, sex can be better than ever after midlife.

"Chia-Chia Lin’s extraordinary debut, THE UNPASSING, out this week from Farrar, Straus & Giroux, is that rarest treasure...
05/11/2019
The Only Way to Save a Beached Whale - Electric Literature

"Chia-Chia Lin’s extraordinary debut, THE UNPASSING, out this week from Farrar, Straus & Giroux, is that rarest treasure in our age of distraction: a small, unassuming masterpiece of close attention, a novel that builds and moves across time while sustaining the intensity of a poet’s gaze. It is a quiet book, but that quiet is neither staid nor aloof. It is, rather, like the eerie hush that follows a violence, the quiet of dust clearing after explosion."

Read an excerpt via Electric Literature:

Excerpt, Chapter 2 We used to drive forty minutes into Anchorage to shop at a Korean grocery. The one vaguely Chinese store was associated with a Chinese mainlander, and mainlanders lacked values. That owner, my mother said, stirred rat meat into the ground pork; when you unwrapped the butcher paper...

This Monday was the Met Gala, with its theme “Camp: Notes on Fashion” inspired by Susan Sontag’s seminal essay, “Notes o...
05/10/2019
“Notes on Camp”

This Monday was the Met Gala, with its theme “Camp: Notes on Fashion” inspired by Susan Sontag’s seminal essay, “Notes on Camp.” The night featured wild fashion, with everything from Kacey Musgraves dressed as a Barbie doll to Jared Leto holding a replica of his own head and Billy Porter outfitted as an Egyptian god.

What exactly is “camp”? And did any of these outfits actually achieve what Sontag was writing about? What follows is Sontag’s “Notes on Camp” from her collection Against Interpretation, which was originally published in 1966.

Read Susan Sontag's Notes on Camp.

"Climate change is a tragedy, but Nathaniel Rich makes clear that it is also a crime—a thing that bad people knowingly m...
05/09/2019
Two New Books Dramatically Capture the Climate Change Crisis

"Climate change is a tragedy, but Nathaniel Rich makes clear that it is also a crime—a thing that bad people knowingly made worse, for their personal gain. That, I suspect, is one of the many aspects to the climate change battle that posterity will find it hard to believe, and impossible to forgive."

The New York Times Books on Nathaniel Rich's LOSING EARTH.

In David Wallace-Wells’s “The Uninhabitable Earth” and Nathaniel Rich’s “Losing Earth,” we have a picture of the increasingly dire problem of global warming.

“THE UNPASSING [by Chia-Chia Lin] is a singularly vast and captivating novel, beautifully written in free-flowing prose ...
05/08/2019
A Debut Novel Revisits a Tragedy in an Asian-American Family

“THE UNPASSING [by Chia-Chia Lin] is a singularly vast and captivating novel, beautifully written in free-flowing prose that quietly disarms with its intermittent moments of poetic idiosyncrasy. But what makes Lin’s novel such an important book is the extent to which it probes America’s mythmaking about itself, which can just as easily unmake as it can uplift." (The New York Times Books)

Chia-Chia Lin’s “The Unpassing” is set in 1980s Alaska, but its themes — of the immigrant struggle and private grief — are universal.

A Novel That’s Equals Parts Murder Mystery, Courtroom Drama and Immigration Tale: "MIRACLE CREEK is a brave novel that c...
05/06/2019
A Novel That’s Equals Parts Murder Mystery, Courtroom Drama and Immigration Tale

A Novel That’s Equals Parts Murder Mystery, Courtroom Drama and Immigration Tale: "MIRACLE CREEK is a brave novel that challenges assumptions of reality."

The New York Times Books reviews Angie Kim's new book, MIRACLE CREEK.

In her debut, “Miracle Creek,” Angie Kim explores just how far people will go to protect their families.

"It is not enough to appeal to narrow self-interest; narrow self-interest, after all, is how we got here."Read an excerp...
05/06/2019
Losing Earth

"It is not enough to appeal to narrow self-interest; narrow self-interest, after all, is how we got here."

Read an excerpt from Nathaniel Rich's LOSING EARTH, a look at the decade we almost solved climate change:

Read an excerpt from Nathaniel Rich's newest book.

André Aciman on his Call Me by Your Name sequel, FIND ME:"Elio and Oliver have been with me ever since they visited my p...
05/05/2019
Sneak Peek: Find Me

André Aciman on his Call Me by Your Name sequel, FIND ME:

"Elio and Oliver have been with me ever since they visited my pages and they’ve never left. I fell in love with them, fell in love with their love, and have never stopped thinking of them."

We're excited to reveal the cover for André Aciman's new book, Find Me.

"What’s fresh and interesting about THE LIGHT YEARS is its account of gay survivalism—what it’s like to be rejected or a...
05/05/2019
On Being Young, Gay and Addicted in the 1970s

"What’s fresh and interesting about THE LIGHT YEARS is its account of gay survivalism—what it’s like to be rejected or adrift from others’ custody; coupling occasionally; at least once in love; and often in profound solitude in the natural world...The rare thing the book offers is a nearly documentary collection of gay and genderqueer kids, and their situations, in the early 1970s."

The New York Times Books reviews THE LIGHT YEARS by Chris Rush.

“The Light Years,” a memoir by the artist Chris Rush, evokes his troubled youth in a wealthy Catholic family in New Jersey and his search for acceptance in the mountains of the Southwest.

“A rich, novelistic tale of a young woman whose life spans both sides of the United States-Mexican border . . . an illum...
05/04/2019
She Entered the U.S. Illegally as a Child. She Was Stabbed Nearly to Death After Being Deported.

“A rich, novelistic tale of a young woman whose life spans both sides of the United States-Mexican border . . . an illuminating work of literature.”

The New York Times Books on THE DEATH AND LIFE OF AIDA HERNANDEZ by Aaron Bobrow-Strain:

“The Death and Life of Aida Hernandez,” by Aaron Bobrow-Strain, captures the plight of an undocumented Mexican immigrant in harrowing, novelistic detail.

"I like seeing characters that make us realize that we don’t know anything."Check out a conversation from this superstar...
05/04/2019
A Woman’s Place

"I like seeing characters that make us realize that we don’t know anything."

Check out a conversation from this superstar AWP panel, feat. Lydia Kiesling, Ling Ma, Katrina Carrasco, Chia-Chia Lin, Tessa Fontaine, and Madeline ffitch!

An AWP panel conversation featuring six writers.

"Lin’s attention to detail is startling, and though she keeps close to Gavin’s childhood experience, she also allows us ...
05/02/2019
Review | In the wake of the space shuttle Challenger disaster, a family tragedy unfolds

"Lin’s attention to detail is startling, and though she keeps close to Gavin’s childhood experience, she also allows us to read between the lines and intuit the depth of the family’s grief, financial straits and fear of belittlement from their white neighbors and colleagues. Anyone who has ever grieved—be it the loss of a person, home, country or security—will feel a sense of recognition. THE UNPASSING is a remarkable, unflinching debut." (Washington Post)

Chia-Chia Lin’s “The Unpassing” is a remarkable, unflinching debut.

“At various times, the inhabitants of the U.S. Empire have been shot, shelled, starved, interned, dispossessed, tortured...
05/01/2019
“How to Hide an Empire”: Daniel Immerwahr on the History of the Greater United States

“At various times, the inhabitants of the U.S. Empire have been shot, shelled, starved, interned, dispossessed, tortured and experimented on. What they haven’t been, by and large, is seen.”

Watch Democracy Now!'s interview with HOW TO HIDE AN EMPIRE author Daniel Immerwahr:

“How to Hide an Empire: A History of the Greater United States.” That’s the title of a new book examining a part of the U.S. that is often overlooked: the nation’s overseas territories from Puerto Rico to Guam, former territories like the Philippines, and its hundreds of military bases scatt...

Literary Hub's list of 11 Books You Should Read This May features TEARS OF THE TRUFFLEPIG by Fernando A. Flores and THE ...
05/01/2019
11 Books You Should Read This May

Literary Hub's list of 11 Books You Should Read This May features TEARS OF THE TRUFFLEPIG by Fernando A. Flores and THE UNPASSING by Chia-Chia Lin!

Binnie Kirshenbaum, Rabbits for Food (Soho Press) During the forced reverie of New Year’s Eve, Binnie Kirshenbaum’s clinically depressed writer-protagonist Bunny completely unravels and ends up in …

"Art arrives out of a tension between the private and the public."INSTRUCTIONS FOR A FUNERAL author David Means writes f...
04/30/2019
David Means on the World As Endless Inspiration

"Art arrives out of a tension between the private and the public."

INSTRUCTIONS FOR A FUNERAL author David Means writes for Literary Hub:

If you go into a painter’s studio you’ll often find things pinned to the walls above a workbench—photographs, postcards, and, on the bench, bits of canvas, driftwood, old tools. In the artist studi…

Night thoughts are not like bats,Do not trip out at duskWith bumbershoots and spats,And fur coats, in sub fuse,Do not fa...
04/29/2019
‘Night Thoughts,’ A Poem by A.E. Stallings

Night thoughts are not like bats,
Do not trip out at dusk
With bumbershoots and spats,
And fur coats, in sub fuse,

Do not fall into flight
Into the upside-down
Colander of the night,
And stagger on the town.

Keep reading the poem "Night Thoughts" by A. E. Stallings via Literary Hub:

Night thoughts are not like bats, Do not trip out at dusk With bumbershoots and spats, And fur coats, in sub fuse, Do not fall into flight Into the upside-down Colander of the night, And stagger on…

"I am a New Yorker. I barely feel American. I don’t feel that these two things contradict each other."Rowan Ricardo Phil...
04/28/2019
The Antiguans

"I am a New Yorker. I barely feel American. I don’t feel that these two things contradict each other."

Rowan Ricardo Phillips writes a Personal Essay on Impersonal Poetry for Work in Progress:

An essay by author and poet Rowan Ricardo Phillips.

How John Hersey Revealed the Horrors of the Atomic Bomb to the US: Remembering HIROSHIMA, the Story that Changed Everyth...
04/28/2019
How John Hersey Revealed the Horrors of the Atomic Bomb to the US

How John Hersey Revealed the Horrors of the Atomic Bomb to the US: Remembering HIROSHIMA, the Story that Changed Everything

Read an excerpt from Jeremy Treglown's MR. STRAIGHT ARROW via Literary Hub.

How did John Hersey—not Japanese, not an eyewitness, not a scientist—come to be the first person to communicate the experience of an atomic bomb to a global audience? Some of the answers are squash…

"The Catholic Church is turning to outside arbiters to reckon with its history of sexual abuse. But skeptics argue that ...
04/27/2019
What Do the Church’s Victims Deserve?

"The Catholic Church is turning to outside arbiters to reckon with its history of sexual abuse. But skeptics argue that its legacy of evasion continues."

Paul Elie writes for The New Yorker:

The Catholic Church is turning to outside arbiters to reckon with its history of sexual abuse. But skeptics argue that its legacy of evasion continues.

"Our cultural voices can be so liberating."Cherríe Moraga and Rigoberto González in conversation:
04/27/2019
Liberating the Literary Mexican Voice

"Our cultural voices can be so liberating."

Cherríe Moraga and Rigoberto González in conversation:

A conversation between Cherríe Moraga and Rigoberto González.

"The more empty the photograph, the more it implies horror. The void that dominates an empty photograph is the site of p...
04/26/2019
The Empty Room

"The more empty the photograph, the more it implies horror. The void that dominates an empty photograph is the site of past human activity. It presents itself as a hole in the middle of the picture. The beds, tables, chairs, lamps are not the subject; they are the boundary. Some empty images tease the eye, suggesting clues that may dissolve upon closer examination. More often the scene is as near to a blank canvas as it can be without fading into nothingness. But then we, as habituated viewers, tend to brush a dramatic gloss upon such pictures. What we see cannot be as perfectly banal as it seems. The lighting and composition awaken unconscious memories of crime-scene photos; the drama comes from what is missing. It’s a bit like Sherlock Holmes’s dog who did not bark. What is missing is an apparent reason for the picture to have been taken."

Luc Sante writes for The Paris Review:

Luc Sante on the uncanny disturbance of the crime-scene photograph.

"T. S. Eliot said, 'Genuine poetry can communicate before it is understood,' but I’m a step behind that, thinking of the...
04/26/2019
The Bones of Language

"T. S. Eliot said, 'Genuine poetry can communicate before it is understood,' but I’m a step behind that, thinking of the moment the ear catches on something it wishes to remember, or recognizes something it believes it’s heard before. I’m attracted to poetry that I can hear before I understand. This preference doesn’t just arise from an intuition of pleasure, though pleasure has something to do with it. Sound can move around corners; sound takes a little longer to organize itself in the senses than what’s seen. I think what you’re hearing when you hear such poetry is the bones of language. You’re seeing something like the interior architecture of the great cathedral, you’re getting closer to the intuited structure behind the very possibility of saying anything at all. Poetry like this admits the illegible spaces in who we are, the inaccessible places where communication is always attempted, but rarely fully realized."

Poet Katie Peterson writes for Work in Progress:

An essay from poet Katie Peterson.

The journalistic technique used in “Hiroshima” proved enormously influential, but Hersey himself seldom returned to it. ...
04/24/2019
John Hersey and the Art of Fact

The journalistic technique used in “Hiroshima” proved enormously influential, but Hersey himself seldom returned to it. He grew convinced that his higher calling was fiction, and nobody could persuade him otherwise.

The New Yorker on MR. STRAIGHT ARROW by Jeremy Treglown, a biography of John Hersey.

Hersey pioneered a radically new form of journalism. But he grew convinced that his higher calling was fiction, and nobody could persuade him otherwise.

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